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  1. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Antliff, Mark. Avant-Garde Fascism: The Mobilization of Myth, Art, and Cul-Ture in France, 1909–1939. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2007. Xv, 352p., Bibl., Ill., Index, $23.95. The Merging of Aesthetics and Violence by Georges Sorel, and the Appropriation of His Writings by Georges Valois, Philippe Lamour, and Thierry Maulnier in a Modernist Quest for Order. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  2. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Leibniz’s Theory of Substance and His Metaphysics of the Incarnation. In Paul Lodge & T. W. C. Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance and Identity. Routledge.
    This paper explores the development of Leibniz’s metaphysics of the Incarnation in the context of his philosophy. In particular it asks to what extent Leibniz’s repeated endorsement of the traditional analogy between the union in humankind of soul (mind) and body, and the union in Christ of divine and human natures, could be accommodated by his more general metaphysical doctrines. Such an investigation highlights some of the deepest commitments in Leibniz’s theory of substance as well as detect in it some (...)
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  3. Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.) (forthcoming). Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Primary Matter, Primitive Passive Power, and Creaturely Limitation in Leibniz. Studia Leibnitiana.
    In this paper I argue that in Leibniz’s mature metaphysics primary matter is not a positive constituent which must be added to the form in order to have a substance. Primary matter is merely a way to express the negation of some further perfection. It does not have a positive ontological status and merely indicates the limitation or imperfection of a substance. To be sure, Leibniz is less than explicit on this point, and in many texts he writes as if (...)
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  5. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought. In Irena Backus, Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  6. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):1-24.
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far from imprisoning its students in (...)
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  7. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2014). Leibniz’s Metaphysical Evil Revisited. In Samuel Newlands Larry Jorgensen (ed.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford University Press. 112-134.
    The category of metaphysical evil introduced by Leibniz appears to cast a sinister shadow over the goodness of creation. It seems to imply that creatures, simply in virtue of not being gods, are to some degree intrinsically and inescapably evil. After briefly unpacking this difficulty and outlining a recent attempt to deal with it, this paper returns to the texts to propose a novel and multilayered understanding of Leibniz’s category of metaphysical evil by reading it against the backdrop of the (...)
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  8. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2013). Leibniz’s Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological and Pragmatic Reasons. In J. Parkin & T. Stanton (eds.), Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. 139-164.
    Leibniz is not commonly numbered amongst canonical writers on toleration. One obvious reason is that, unlike Locke, he wrote no treatise specifically devoted to that doctrine. Another is the enormous amount of energy which he famously devoted to ecclesiastical reunification. Promoting the reunification of Christian churches is an objective quite different from promoting the toleration of different religious faiths – so different, in fact, that they are sometimes even construed as mutually exclusive. Ecclesiastical reunification aims to find agreement at least (...)
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  9. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2013). Rationalism. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2011). The Conformity of Faith with Reason in the “Discours Préliminaire” of the Theodicy. In Paul Rateau (ed.), Lectures et interprétations des Essais de théodicée de G. W. Leibniz. [Studia Leibnitiana Sonderhefte 40]. Steiner. 231-245.
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  11. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2010). Protogaea. Annals of Science 67 (2):281-283.
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  12. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2010). Il rapporto fede-ragione nel pensiero Leibniziano. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 102 (4):619-632.
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  13. Michael J. Almeida, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Kim Atkins, Catriona Mac-Kenzie, Randall E. Auxier, Phillip S. Seng, Desmond Avery & H. E. Baber (2009). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to David Boersema, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon 97116. Teaching Philosophy 32 (4):427.
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  14. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2009). Leibniz: An Intellectual Biography. Cambridge University Press.
    Of all the thinkers of the century of genius that inaugurated modern philosophy, none lived an intellectual life more rich and varied than Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Trained as a jurist and employed as a counsellor, librarian, and historian, he made famous contributions to logic, mathematics, physics, and metaphysics, yet viewed his own aspirations as ultimately ethical and theological, and married these theoretical concerns with politics, diplomacy, and an equally broad range of practical reforms: juridical, economic, administrative, technological, medical, and (...)
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  15. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2009). Leibniz Lecteur de Spinoza. The Leibniz Review 19:71-75.
  16. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2009). The Leibniz-Des Bosses Correspondence. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):424-428.
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  17. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2007). Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century. Yale University Press.
    Throughout his long intellectual life, Leibniz penned his reflections on Christian theology, yet this wealth of material has never been systematically gathered or studied. This book addresses an important and central aspect of these neglected materials—Leibniz’s writings on two mysteries central to Christian thought, the Trinity and the Incarnation. -/- From Antognazza’s study emerges a portrait of a thinker surprisingly receptive to traditional Christian theology and profoundly committed to defending the legitimacy of truths beyond the full grasp of human reason. (...)
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  18. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2006). Arguments for the Existence of God: The Continental European Debate. In The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Volume 2. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    This chapter argues that the outbreak of the Protestant Reformation undermined the Christian consensus that unaided human reason could prove God’s existence. As a consequence the issue of the provability of God in principle gained new prominence and had to be addressed in the first instance before entering the discussion of specific proofs of His existence. On the basis of the answers given to the preliminary question of the provability of God’s existence, the chapter discusses eighteenth-century reformulations of a priori (...)
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  19. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2006). The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Volume 2. Cambridge Univ Pr.
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  20. F. U. T. Aepinus, Archibald Alexander, Archibald Alison, John Anderson, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Thomas Aquinas, D. M. Armstrong, Antione Arnauld, J. L. Austin & Johann Sebastian Bach (2004). Index of Names and Subjects. In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press. 361.
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  21. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2003). Leibniz and the Post-Copernican Universe. Koyré Revisited. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):309-327.
  22. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2003). Leibniz's Metaphysics: Its Origins and Development (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):131-132.
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  23. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2002). Leibniz and Religious Toleration. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):601-622.
    As one might expect, throughout his life Leibniz assumed an attitude of religious toleration both ad intra (that is, toward Christians of other confessions) and ad extra (that is, toward non-Christians, notably Muslims). Focusing in particular on his epistolary exchange with the French Catholic convert Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, I argue that neither toleration ad intra nor toleration ad extra is grounded for Leibniz in indifference toward the content of revealed religion. On the contrary, Leibniz remained convinced of the objective truth of (...)
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  24. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). Debilissimae Entitates? The Leibniz Review 11:1-22.
    Over the past decades a number of scholars have identified Johann Heinrich Bisterfeld as one of the most decisive early influences on Leibniz. In particular, the impressive similarity between their conceptions of universal harmony has been stressed. Since the issue of relations is at the heart of both Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s doctrines of universal harmony, the extent of the similarity between their doctrines will depend, however, on Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s respective theories of relations, and especially on their ontologies of relations. (...)
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  25. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). Leibniz de Deo Trino: Philosophical Aspects of Leibniz's Conception of the Trinity. Religious Studies 37 (1):1-13.
    This paper discusses Leibniz's Trinitarian doctrine in the light of his philosophy, as revealed by a set of virtually unstudied texts. The first part of the paper examines Leibniz's defence of the Trinity against the charge of contradiction as a necessary precondition to the development of his own conception of the Trinity. The second part discusses some of the key features of Leibniz's Trinitarian doctrine, notably his conception of person, the analogy between the human mind and the Trinity, and the (...)
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  26. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). The Defence of the Mysteries of the Trinity and the Incarnation: An Example of Leibniz's 'Other' Reason. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):283 – 309.
    In this paper I will discuss certain aspects of Leibniz's theory and practice of 'soft reasoning' as exemplified by his defence of two central mysteries of the Christian revelation: the Trinity and the Incarnation. By theory and practice of 'soft' or 'broad' reasoning, I mean the development of rational strategies which can successefully be applied to the many areas of human understanding which escape strict demonstration, that is, the 'hard' or 'narrow' reasoning typical of mathematical argumentation. These strategies disclose an (...)
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  27. Maria Rosa Antognazza (1994). Die Rolle der Trinitäts-und Menschwerdungsdiskussionen für die Entstehung von Leibniz'Denken. Studia Leibnitiana 26 (1):56-75.
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  28. Maria Rosa Antognazza (1991). Previously Unpublished Works by Leibniz on Controversies About the Trinity. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 83 (4):525-550.
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