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  1. Marianne M. Jennings (forthcoming). The Regulatory Life Cycle. Business Ethics.
     
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  2. Heather E. Canary & Marianne M. Jennings (2008). Principles and Influence in Codes of Ethics: A Centering Resonance Analysis Comparing Pre- and Post-Sarbanes-Oxley Codes of Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):263 - 278.
    This study examines the similarities and differences in pre- and post-Sarbanes-Oxley corporate ethics codes and codes of conduct using the framework of structuration theory. Following the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation in 2002 in the United States, publicly traded companies there undertook development and revision of their codes of ethics in response to new regulatory requirements as well as incentives under the U.S. Corporate Sentencing Guidelines, which were also revised as part of the SOX mandates. Questions that remain are (...)
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  3. Robert J. Aalberts & Marianne M. Jennings (1999). The Ethics of Slotting: Is This Bribery, Facilitation Marketing or Just Plain Competition? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):207 - 215.
    The practice of manufacturers' payments of fees to retailers for the display and sale of their products has become a common practice. In the grocery retail business, the fees paid by manufacturers are called slotting fees, or a payment made for a slot on the shelf. The same practice is used now in the retail book industry. Large book chains command high fees from publishers for the prominent display of books. Entrepreneur's products are often precluded from stores and markets because (...)
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  4. Larry R. Smeltzer & Marianne M. Jennings (1998). Why an International Code of Business Ethics Would Be Good for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (1):57 - 66.
    Many international business training programs present a viewpoint of cultural relativism that encourages business people to adapt to the host country's culture. This paper presents an argument that cultural relativism is not always appropriate for business ethics; rather, a code of conduct must be adapted which presents guidelines for core ethical business conduct across cultures. Both moral and economic evidence is provided to support the argument for a universal code of ethics. Also, four steps are presented that will help ensure (...)
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  5. Marianne M. Jennings, Larry R. Smeltzer & Marie F. Zener (1993). The Ethics of Worker Safety Nets for Corporate Change. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):459 - 468.
    Corporate change and employee dislocation are inevitable in a free market. However, the current employment relationship in the U.S. that affords a perceived employment safety net is contrary to the natural canon of honesty. Employees cannot be guaranteed employment when a company fails or a product is no longer viable. Attempts to provide costly employment safety nets cause a firm to allocate resources to nonproductive programs that may ultimately cause a loss of competitiveness. These strategies to provide alternate employment may (...)
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  6. Marianne Moody Jennings (1988). The Abolition of the Right to Fire-No-Fault is in Divorce Only. Business and Society 27 (1):23-28.
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