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  1. Maribel Romero, On Concealed Questions.
    To appear in Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory XVI. Ithaca, NY: CLC.
     
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  2. Maribel Romero, Tense and Intensionality in Specificational Copular Sentences.
    Specificational sentences show Connectivity Effects (Akmajian 1970, Higgins 1979, Halvorsen 1978, Jacobson 1994, among others). For example, an NP like no man embedded in a relative clause in general cannot bind a pronoun outside the relative clause, as illustrated in (3a); but in specificational copular sentences this binding is possible, as in (3b). This effect is called Variable Binding Connectivity. Similarly, the NP a unicorn cannot be interpreted de dicto with respect to the embedded verb look for in (4a); but (...)
     
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  3. Maribel Romero, The Penn Lambda Calculator: Pedagogical Software for Natural Language Semantics.
    This paper describes a novel pedagogical software program that can be seen as an online companion to one of the standard textbooks of formal natural language semantics, Heim and Kratzer (1998). The Penn Lambda Calculator is a multifunctional application designed for use in standard graduate and undergraduate introductions to formal semantics: Teachers can use the application to demonstrate complex semantic derivations in the classroom and modify them interactively, and students can use it to work on problem sets provided by the (...)
     
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  4. Maribel Romero & Laura Kallmeyer, Scope and Situation Binding in LTAG Using Semantic Unification.
    This paper develops a framework for TAG (Tree Adjoining Grammar) semantics that brings together ideas from different recent approaches. Then, within this framework, an analysis of scope is proposed that accounts for the different scopal properties of quantifiers, adverbs, raising verbs and attitude verbs. Finally, including situation variables in the semantics, different situation binding possibilities are derived for different types of quantificational elements.
     
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  5. Chung-Hye Han & Maribel Romero, Negation, Focus and Alternative Questions.
    This paper presents the observation that negative non-wh-questions with inverted negation do not have an alternative (alt-)question reading. In English, a simple question like (1) has two possible readings: a yes-no (yn-)question reading, paraphrased in (1a), and an alt-question reading, disambiguated in (1b). Under the yn-question reading, the question can be answered as in (2); under the alt-question reading, acceptable answers are (3).
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  6. Maribel Romero, Biased Yes/No Questions: The Role of VERUM.
    Certain information-seeking yes/no (yn)-questions –e.g. Did Jorge really bring a present? and Doesn’t John drink?– convey an epistemic bias of the speaker. Two main approaches to biased yn-questions are compared: the VERUM approach and the Decision Theory approach. It is argued that, while Decision Theory can formally characterize the notion of “intent” of a question, VERUM is needed to derive the data.
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  7. Maribel Romero, Intensional Choice Functions for Which Phrases.
    There are two main approaches to the scopal properties of the N’-restrictors of which-phrases. One line attributes widest scope within the interrogative clause to the entire which-phrase, outside the question formation operator, often assumed to reside in C0. The result is Karttunen’s (1977) question denotation --exemplified in (1b)--,1 whose distinctive feature is that the semantic contribution of the N’- restrictor of the which-phrase is represented outside the so-called question nucleus, i.e., outside the subformula “p=…”. The second main avenue interprets (...)
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  8. Maribel Romero, LTAG Semantics for Questions.
    This papers presents a compositional semantic analysis of interrogatives clauses in LTAG (Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammar) that captures the scopal properties of wh- and nonwh-quantificational elements. It is shown that the present approach derives the correct semantics for examples claimed to be problematic for LTAG semantic approaches based on the derivation tree. The paper further provides an LTAG semantic derivation of interrogative clauses under question embedding verbs.
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  9. Maribel Romero, Quantification Over Situations Variables in LTAG: Some Constraints.
    Some natural language expressions –namely, determiners like every, some, most, etc.— introduce quantification over individuals (or, in other words, they express relations between sets of individuals). For example, the truth conditions of a sentence like (1a) are represented in Predicate Logic (PrL) by binding the..
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  10. Maribel Romero, Reduced Conditionals and Focus.
    The term “Reduced Conditional” is coined by Schwarz (1996, 1998, 2000) to designate a certain kind of ellipsis that may occur in the consequent of a Conditional in German, as illustrated in (1): (1a) is a Full Conditional (FC, henceforth) and (1b) is its Reduced Conditional (RC) counterpart.
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  11. Maribel Romero, Two Constructions with Most and Their Semantic Properties.
    In (1b), for the most part induces a so-called Quantificational Variability Effect (QVE) on the NP the linguists from the East Coast, yielding roughly the interpretation ‘most of the linguists from the East Coast came to NELS’. We claim that the two constructions above differ in the domain where they apply, producing similar but not identical quantificational interpretations over the NP. In particular, we argue that most of the NPs applies to the nominal domain, while for the most part applies (...)
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  12. Maribel Romero, Connectivity in a Unified Analysis of Specificational Subjects and Concealed Questions.
    Connectivity, found in a number of constructions involving typically a trace of movement or gap, is the effect by which a constituent behaves grammatically as if it occupied not its surface position but the position of the gap. The phenomenon is central to the debate between defendants of Direct Compositionality –where the semantics is read off the ‘visible’, surface syntax– and the defendants of the so-called Logical Form (LF) –according to which semantics is computed on an abstract syntactic representation, LF, (...)
     
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  13. Maribel Romero, The Temperature Paradox and Temporal Interpretation.
    Montague’s analysis of the well-known temperature paradox poses a problem for Gupta’s syllogism, whose surface syntax differs from the temperature syllogism in the addition of the intensional adverb necessarily. Lasersohn (2005) argues that the puzzle arising from these syllogisms can be solved if one adopts the Fregean presuppositional treatment of definite descriptions, and concludes that the temperature-Gupta puzzle provides an argument in favor of such treatment. This paper shows that the analysis of definite descriptions is in fact orthogonal to the (...)
     
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  14. Maribel Romero (2013). Modal Superlatives: A Compositional Analysis. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 21 (1):79-110.
    Superlative adjectives accompanied by certain modal adjectives like possible (e.g. John bought the largest possible present) are ambiguous between a reading where possible is a regular noun modifier and a reading paraphrasable as ‘as Adj as possible’, called ‘modal superlative reading’. Three interesting restrictions have been observed in the literature. First, possible and some other adjectives ending in -able, but not potential and probable, support the latter reading. Second, when the modal adjective appears postnominally, only the modal superlative reading is (...)
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  15. Maribel Romero (2011). Modal Superlatives And 3-Place Vs. 2-Place -Est. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 6 (1):10.
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  16. Maribel Romero (ed.) (2008). Proceedings of the Esslli 2008 Workshop `What Syntax Feeds Semantics?'.
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  17. Maribel Romero (2005). Concealed Questions and Specificational Subjects. Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (6):687 - 737.
    This paper is concerned with Noun Phrases (NPs, henceforth) occurring in two constructions: concealed question NPs and NP subjects of specificational sentences. The first type of NP is illustrated in (1). The underlined NPs in (1) have been called ‘concealed questions’ because sentences that embed them typically have the same truth-conditional meaning as the corresponding versions with a full-fledged embedded interrogative clause, as illustrated in (2) (Heim 1979).
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  18. Daniel Hardt & Maribel Romero (2004). Ellipsis and Discourse Structure. Journal of Semantics 21:375-414.
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  19. Maribel Romero & Chung-Hye Han (2004). On Negative Yes/No Questions. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (5):609-658.
    Preposed negation yes/no (yn)-questions like Doesn''t Johndrink? necessarily carry the implicature that the speaker thinks Johndrinks, whereas non-preposed negation yn-questions like DoesJohn not drink? do not necessarily trigger this implicature. Furthermore,preposed negation yn-questions have a reading ``double-checking'''' pand a reading ``double-checking'''' p, as in Isn''t Jane comingtoo? and in Isn''t Jane coming either? respectively. We present otheryn-questions that raise parallel implicatures and argue that, in allthe cases, the presence of an epistemic conversational operator VERUMderives the existence and content of the (...)
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  20. Chung-Hye Han & Maribel Romero, Ellipsis and Movement in the Syntax of Whether/Q...Or Questions.
    In English, a non-wh-question may have a disjunctive phrase explicitly providing the choices that the question ranges over. For example, in (1), the disjunction or not indicates that the the choice is between the positive and the negative polarity for the relevant proposition, as spelled out in the yes/no (yn)-question reading (2) and in the answers (2a,b). Another example is (3). The disjunction in (3) can be understood as providing the choices that the question ranges over, hence giving rise to (...)
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  21. Maribel Romero, Quantifier Scope in German: An MCTAG Analysis.
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