Search results for 'Mariella de Simone' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tove Pettersen (2010). Acting for Others: Moral Ontology in Simone de Beauvoir's Pyrrhus and Cineas. Simone de Beauvoir Studies 26 (2009-2010).score: 216.0
    There are prominent resemblances between issues addressed by Simone de Beauvoir in her early essay on moral philosophy, Pyrrhus and Cineas (1944), and issues attracting the attention of contemporary feminist ethicists, especially those concerned with the ethics of care. They include a focus on relationships, interaction, and mutual dependency. Both emphasize concrete ethical challenges rooted in everyday life, such as those affecting parents and children. Both are critical of the level of abstraction and insensitivity to the situation of the (...)
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  2. Ulrika Björk (2010). Paradoxes of Femininity in the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):39-60.score: 192.0
    This article explicates the meaning of the paradox from the perspective of sexual difference, as articulated by Simone de Beauvoir. I claim that the self, the other, and their becoming are sexed in Beauvoir’s early literary writing before the question of sexual difference is posed in The Second Sex (1949). In particular, Beauvoir’s description of Françoise’s subjective becoming in the novel She Came to Stay (1943) anticipates her later systematic description of ‘the woman in love’. In addition, I argue (...)
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  3. Pettersen Tove (2006). Moralsk frihet og situasjon: Simone de Beauvoir. Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 41 (4):284-298.score: 192.0
    Simone de Beauvoir is renown for The Second Sex (1949), a work now considered to be a feminist classic. Nevertheless, when Beauvoir wrote this book she did not explicitly endorse the women's movement, nor did she associate her analysis with the women's liberation. It took twenty-one years after the publication before she publicly declared herself a feminist, but from that point on she was a dedicated feminist. How can her development from a gender blind young philosopher to a radical (...)
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  4. Olga Grau (2013). La ambigua escritura de Simone de Beauvoir. Revista de Filosofía 69:151-167.score: 170.0
    The aim of this article is to show the relationships between philosophy and literature that may derive from Simone de Beauvoir writing who makes a contribution to contemporary reflection regarding these relationships. Her own writing, which could be named as “ambiguous writing” due to its particularities, constitutes a proposal and a commitment to overcome or to exceed the limits that either literature or philosophy might impose to comply with the accomplishment of the specific features inherent to these discursive genres. (...)
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  5. Matthew Braddock (2007). A Critique of Simone de Beauvoir's Existential Ethics. Philosophy Today 51 (3):303-311.score: 168.0
  6. Russell J. De Simone (1980). Modern Research on the Sources of Saint Augustine's Doctrine of Original Sin. Augustinian Studies 11:205-227.score: 160.0
  7. Denyse de Saivre (2003). Pourquoi reparier de Simone de Beauvoir. Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 13 (1):157-159.score: 152.0
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  8. I. Ruiz de Temino (1999). Figuras del amigo en la fenomenología narrativa de Simone Weil. Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 22:253-256.score: 152.0
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  9. Silvia Carnero (2005). La condición femenina desde el pensamiento de Simone de Beauvoir. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 40:12.score: 146.0
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  10. J. Disse (1994). Comment Fonder Une Éthique de la Nature? Un Essai de Pensée Chrétienne à Partir de Simone Weil. Recherches de Science Religieuse 82 (1):71-86.score: 146.0
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  11. Adela Muñoz Fernández (2004). El Carácter Sagrado Del Otro: Reflexiones a Partir de Simone Weil. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 33:4.score: 146.0
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  12. Esteban A. Garacía (1998). sujeto, corporalidad y hábito en la teoría de la percepción de Simone Weil. Escritos de Filosofía 17 (33):121-146.score: 146.0
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  13. Olga Grau Duhart (2013). La Ambigua Escritura de Simone de Beauvoir. Revista de Filosofía 69:151-167.score: 146.0
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  14. Bernard Joly (2014). Compte rendu de Nicolas de Villiers, sieur de Chandoux, Lettres sur l'or potable, suivies du traité De la connaissance des vrais principes de la nature et des mélanges et de fragments d'un Commentaire sur l'Amphithéâtre de la sapience éternelle de Khunrath. Textes édités et présentés par Sylvain Matton avec des études de Xavier Kieft et de Simone Mazauric, Paris/Milan, SÉHA/ARCHÈ, 2013. Methodos 14.score: 146.0
    Tous ceux qui s’intéressent à la vie et à l’œuvre de Descartes connaissent l’épisode rapporté par Adrien Baillet dans sa Vie de monsieur Descartes (1691) et évoqué par Descartes lui-même dans une lettre à son ami Villebressieu en 1631 (AT I 212-213) : vers la fin des années 1620, le jeune Descartes participa à Paris chez le nonce apostolique, le cardinal Guidi di Bagno, à une « assemblée de personnes savantes et curieuses », parmi lesquelles le cardinal de Berulle et (...)
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  15. Lourdes Otero León (2010). Narcisismo, Amor y Misticismo En El Segundo Sexo y En Las Novelas Memorialistas de Simone de Beauvoir: Una Hermenéutica de la Sospecha y de la Facticidad. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 67:5.score: 146.0
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  16. Carmen Revilla (2000). Habitar El Universo: El Tema Del Trabajo En El Pensamiento Político de Simone Weil. Convivium: Revista de Filosofía 13:109-128.score: 146.0
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  17. Margaret A. Simons (ed.) (2006). The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press.score: 146.0
    Since her death in 1986 and the publication of her letters and diaries in 1990, interest in the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir has increased.
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  18. Simone De Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons & Jane Marie Todd (1989). Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir. Hypatia 3 (3):11 - 27.score: 145.3
    In these interviews from 1982 and 1985, I ask Beauvoir about her philosophical differences with Jean-Paul Sartre on the issues of voluntarism vs social conditioning and embodiment, individualism vs reciprocity, and ontology vs ethics. We also discuss her influence on Sartre's work, the problems with the current English translation of The Second Sex, her analyses of motherhood and feminist concepts of woman-identity, and her own experience of sexism.
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  19. Simone de Beauvoir, Margaret A. Simons, Mary Beth Mader & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.) (2004). Simone de Beauvoir: Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press.score: 145.3
    Contents: "Analysis of Claude Bernard's Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine," "Two Unpublished Chapters from She Came to Stay," "Pyrrhus and Cineas," "A Review of The Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty," "Moral Idealism and Political Realism," "Existentialism and Popular Wisdom," "Jean-Paul Sartre," "An Eye for an Eye," "Literature and Metaphysics," "Introduction to an Ethics of Ambiguity," "An Existentialist Looks at Americans," and "What is Existentialism?".
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  20. Sara Heinämaa (1999). Simone de Beauvoir’s Phenomenology of Sexual Difference. Hypatia 14 (4):114-132.score: 144.0
    : The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
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  21. Andrea Veltman (2004). The Sisyphean Torture of Housework: Simone de Beauvoir and Inequitable Divisions of Domestic Work in Marriage. Hypatia 19 (3):121-143.score: 144.0
    : This paper examines Simone de Beauvoir's account of marriage in The Second Sex and argues that Beauvoir's dichotomy between transcendence and immanence can provide an illuminating critique of continuing gender inequities in marriage and divisions of domestic work. Beauvoir's existentialist ethics not only establishes a moral wrong in marriages in which wives perform the second shift of household labor but also supports the need to transform existing normative expectations surrounding wives and domestic work.
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  22. Sonia Kruks (2005). Simone de Beauvoir and the Politics of Privilege. Hypatia 20 (1):178-205.score: 144.0
    : How should socially privileged white feminists (and others) address their privilege? Often, individuals are urged to overcome their own personal racism through a politics of self-transformation. The paper argues that this strategy may be problematic, since it rests on an over-autonomous conception of the self. The paper turns to Simone de Beauvoir for an alternative account of the self, as "situated," and explores what this means for a politics of privilege.
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  23. Kimberly Hutchings (2007). Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence. Hypatia 22 (3):111-132.score: 144.0
    : In this essay, Hutchings contends that Simone de Beauvoir's argument in The Ethics of Ambiguity provides a valuable resource for feminists currently addressing the question of the legitimacy of political violence, whether of the state or otherwise. The reason is not that Beauvoir provides a definitive answer to this question, but rather because of the ways in which she deconstructs it. In enabling her reader to appreciate what is presupposed by a resistant politics that adopts violence as its (...)
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  24. Zeynep Direk (2011). Immanence and Abjection in Simone de Beauvoir. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (1):49-72.score: 144.0
    In this paper, I focus on the term ‘immanence’ in Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex and show how it relates to her historical account of sexual oppression. I argue that Beauvoir's use of Hegel's master−slave dialectic and of Claude Lévi-Strauss's reflection on the prohibition of incest lead her to claim that in all societies “woman” is constructed as “absolutely other.” I show that there is an ambiguous logic of abjection at work in Beauvoir's account that explains why men (...)
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  25. Anne Morgan (2008). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics of Freedom and Absolute Evil. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 75-89.score: 144.0
    Simone de Beauvoir held that human experience is intrinsically ambiguous and that there are no values extrinsic to experience, but she also designated some actions as absolute evil. This essay explains how Beauvoir utilized an intrinsic absolute value to ground an action-guiding principle of freedom that justifies her notion of evil. Morgan’s analysis counters Robin May Schott’s objections that Beauvoir failed to systematically justify her notion of absolute evil and that Beauvoir shifted from a “logic of action” to a (...)
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  26. Karen Vintges (1999). Simone de Beauvoir: A Feminist Thinker for Our Times. Hypatia 14 (4):133 - 144.score: 144.0
    For many, Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has only historic significance. The aim of this article is to show on the contrary that Beauvoir's philosophy already contains all the elements of contemporary feminism-so much so that it can be taken as its paradigm. Beauvoir's ideas about the self are extremely relevant today. Feminist themes such as the logic of "equality and difference" and identity are interwoven in her thinking in ways that can offer solutions to what seem to (...)
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  27. Jen McWeeny (2005). Love, Theory, and Politics: Critical Trinities in Simone de Beauvoir’s The Mandarins. In Sally J. Scholz Shannon Mussett (ed.), Contradictions of Freedom: Philosophical Essays on Simone de Beauvoir’s “The Mandarins. Suny. 157-176.score: 144.0
  28. Karen Vintges (1999). Simone de Beauvoir’s Phenomenology of Sexual Difference. Hypatia 14 (4):133-144.score: 144.0
    : For many, Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has only historic significance. The aim of this article is to show on the contrary that Beauvoir's philosophy already contains all the elements of contemporary feminism—so much so that it can be taken as its paradigm. Beauvoir's ideas about the self are extremely relevant today. Feminist themes such as the logic of "equality and difference" and identity are interwoven in her thinking in ways that can offer solutions to what seem (...)
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  29. Claudia Card (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Simone De Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    Simone de Beauvoir was a philosopher and writer of notable range and influence whose work is central to feminist theory, French existentialism, and contemporary moral and social philosophy. The essays in this volume examine all the major aspects of her thought, including her views on issues such as the role of biology, sexuality and sexual difference, and evil, the influence on her work of Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Husserl, and others, and the philosophical significance of her memoirs and fiction. New (...)
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  30. Nadine Changfoot (2009). Transcendence in Simone de Beauvoir's the Second Sex: Revisiting Masculinist Ontology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (4):391-410.score: 144.0
    A large number of feminist philosophers and social critics accept that Simone de Beauvoir's conception of transcendence in The Second Sex relies on masculinist ontology. In contrast with feminist interpretations that see Beauvoir claiming the success of masculinist ontology, this article argues that transcendence as masculinist ontology does not succeed in The Second Sex because it requires a relation of domination, something contrary to its own definition of freedom-producing relations. The Second Sex obliquely reveals this failure, but Beauvoir does (...)
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  31. Ashley King Scheu (2012). The Viability of the Philosophical Novel: The Case of Simone de Beauvoir's "She Came to Stay". Hypatia 27 (4):791 - 809.score: 144.0
    This article begins by asking if the project to write a philosophical novel is not inherently flawed; it would seem that the novelist must either write an ambiguous text, which would not create a strong enough argument to count as philosophy, or she must write a text with a clear argument, which would not be ambiguous enough to count as good fiction. The only other option available would be to exemplify a preexisting abstract philosophical system in the concrete literary world. (...)
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  32. Emily R. Grosholz (ed.) (2006). The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.score: 144.0
    The legacy of Simone de Beauvoir has yet to be properly assessed and explored. The 50th anniversary of the publication of The Second Sex inspired this volume which brings together philosophers and literary critics, some of whom are well known for their books on Beauvoir (Bauer, Le Doeuff, Moi), others new to Beauvoir studies though long familiar with her work (Grosholz, Imbert, James, Stevenson, Wilson). One aim of this collection is to encourage greater recognition of Beauvoir's philosophical writings through (...)
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  33. Lori J. Marso (2012). Simone de Beauvoir and Hannah Arendt: Judgments in Dark Times. Political Theory 40 (2):165 - 193.score: 144.0
    This article compares Hannah Arendt's famous essay on Adolf Eichmann's trial in Israel in 1961 to Simone de Beauvoir's little studied piece, "An Eye for an Eye," on the trial of Robert Brasillach in France in 1945. Arendt and Beauvoir each determine the complicity of individuals acting within a political order that seeks to eliminate certain forms of otherness and difference, but come to differing conclusions about the significance of the crimes. I explain Beauvoir's account of ambiguity, on which (...)
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  34. F. Brennan (2004). “As Vast as the World”—Reflections on A Very Easy Death by Simone de Beauvoir. Medical Humanities 30 (2):85-90.score: 144.0
    In 1964, Simone de Beauvoir, arguably one of the greatest writers of 20th century Europe, published an account of the final 6 weeks of her mother’s life. It is a beautifully written, raw, honest, and powerful evocation of that period from the viewpoint of a relative. Its themes are universal—love, ambivalence in family ties, loss, and bereavement. Given that the events preceded the modern palliative care movement, reflections are made on differences in medical practice since the book’s publication.
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  35. Karen Vintges (2006). Simone de Beauvoir: A Feminist Thinker Forthe Twenty-First Century. In Margaret A. Simons (ed.), The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press. 214.score: 144.0
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  36. Debra Bergoffen (2003). 12 Simone de Beauvoir:(Re) Counting the Sexual Difference. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. 248.score: 144.0
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  37. Dennis A. Gilbert (2012). Simone de Beauvoir on Existentialist Theater. Sartre Studies International 18 (2):107-126.score: 144.0
    My article focuses on Le Théâtre existentialiste ( Existentialist Theater ) by Simone de Beauvoir, recently translated and published in the volume of the Beauvoir Series on her literary writings. The first part introduces the original sound recording of this text and the circumstances behind its possible production in New York City in 1947 and my discovery of it at Wellesley College in 1996. The second part analyzes the divisions of Beauvoir's remarks as she presents Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, (...)
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  38. Eva Gothlin (2003). Reading Simone de Beauvoir with Martin Heidegger. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. 45--65.score: 144.0
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  39. Michèle Le Doeuff (2006). Engaging with Simone de Beauvoir. In Margaret A. Simons (ed.), The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press.score: 144.0
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  40. Anne Morgan (2009). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics, the Master/Slave Dialectic, and Eichmann as a Sub-Man. Hypatia 24 (2):39 - 53.score: 144.0
    Simone de Beauvoir incorporates a significantly altered form of the Hegelian master/slave dialectic into "The Ethics of Ambiguity." Her ethical theory explains and denounces extreme wrongdoing, such as the mass murder of millions of Jews at the hands of the Nazis. This essay demonstrates that, in the Beauvoirean dialectic, the Nazi value system (and Hitler) was the master, Adolf Eichmann was a slave, and Jews were denied human status. The analysis counters Robin May Schott's claims that "Beauvoir portrays the (...)
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  41. Nancy Bauer (2004). Must We Read Simone de Beauvoir? In Emily Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.score: 144.0
     
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  42. Susan M. Bredlau (2011). Simone de Beauvoir's Apprenticeship of Freedom. Phaenex 6 (1):42-63.score: 144.0
    In The Ethics of Ambiguity , Simone de Beauvoir makes reference to an “apprenticeship of freedom,” but she does not directly address why freedom requires an apprenticeship or what such an apprenticeship entails. Working from Beauvoir’s discussion of freedom in The Ethics of Ambiguity and her discussion of apprenticeships in The Second Sex , I explicate the idea of an apprenticeship of freedom, establishing why an apprenticeship is a necessary condition of freedom and describing how such an apprenticeship is (...)
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  43. Claude Imbert (2004). Simone de Beauvoir: A Woman Philosopher in Her Generation. In Emily R. Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.score: 144.0
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  44. Kate Kirkpatrick (2014). Past Her Prime? Simone de Beauvoir on Motherhood and Old Age. Sophia 53 (2):275-287.score: 144.0
    Despite her reputation as the ‘Mother’ of second-wave feminism, Simone de Beauvoir is not usually heralded as a mother-friendly feminist. In The Second Sex, the passages dedicated to the female body—and especially the pregnant female body—have been dismissed as unfortunate expressions of internalized patriarchy or personal idiosyncrasy. By comparing Beauvoir’s later analysis of old age to aspects of the experience of pregnancy and early motherhood, this essay suggests that Beauvoir’s later work Old Age offers a rich untapped resource for (...)
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  45. Toril Moi (2009). Simone de Beauvoir: The Making of an Intellectual Woman. OUP Oxford.score: 144.0
    In Simone de Beauvoir: The Making of an Intellectual Woman Toril Moi shows how Simone de Beauvoir became Simone de Beauvoir, the leading feminist thinker and emblematic intellectual woman of the twentieth century. Blending biography with literary criticism, feminist theory, and historical and social analysis, this book provides a completely original analysis of Beauvoir's education and formation as an intellectual. -/- In The Second Sex, Beauvoir shows that we constantly make something of what the world tries to (...)
     
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  46. Catherine Wilson (2004). Simone de Beauvoir and Human Dignity. In Emily R. Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.score: 144.0
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  47. Robert Chenavier (2008). Les méditations cartésiennes de Simone Weil. Les Études Philosophiques 3 (3):183-205.score: 140.0
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  48. Juana Sánchez-Gey Venegas (2012). El saber de la experiencia: mujer y filosofía. La gracia de Simone Weil. La comunidad de María Zambrano. Estudios Filosóficos 61 (176):117-126.score: 140.0
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  49. S. Weil & P. Guillerme (1973). Deux lettres inédites de Simone Weil. Dialogue 12 (03):454-464.score: 140.0
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  50. Anissa Castel-Bouchouchi (2008). Le platonisme achevé de Simone Weil. Les Études Philosophiques 3 (3):169-182.score: 140.0
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