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Marilyn Ford [5]Marilyn Sue Ford [1]
  1. Marilyn Ford (1995). Two Modes of Mental Representation and Problem Solution in Syllogistic Reasoning. Cognition 54 (1):1-71.
  2. Marilyn Ford & Virginia M. Holmes (1978). Planning Units and Syntax in Sentence Production. Cognition 6 (1):35-53.
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  3.  3
    Marilyn Ford & Mary Dalrymple (1988). A Note on Some Psychological Evidence and Alternative Grammars. Cognition 29 (1):63-71.
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    Marilyn Ford (2005). Human Nonmonotonic Reasoning: The Importance of Seeing the Logical Strength of Arguments. Synthese 146 (1-2):71 - 92.
    Three studies of human nonmonotonic reasoning are described. The results show that people find such reasoning quite difficult, although being given problems with known subclass-superclass relationships is helpful. The results also show that recognizing differences in the logical strengths of arguments is important for the nonmonotonic problems studied. For some of these problems, specificity – which is traditionally considered paramount in drawing appropriate conclusions – was irrelevant and so should have lead to a “can’t tell” response; however, people could give (...)
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  5.  1
    Maria J. Meyerson, Marilyn Sue Ford, W. Paul Jones & Mary Ann Ward (1991). Science Vocabulary Knowledge of Third and Fifth Grade Students. Science Education 75 (4):419-428.
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  6. Marilyn Ford (2005). Human Nonmonotonic Reasoning: The Importance of Seeing the Logical Strength of Arguments. Synthese 146 (1-2):71-92.
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