1. Mark A. Berkson (2005). Conceptions of Self/No‐Self and Modes of Connection Comparative Soteriological Structures in Classical Chinese Thought. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):293-331.
    This essay examines the ways that the terms "self and "no-self can illuminate the views of classical Chinese thinkers, particularly Confucians such as Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, and the Daoist thinker Zhuangzi. In particular, the use of the term "no-self" to describe Zhuangzi's position is defended. The concepts of self and no-self are analyzed in relation to other terms within the thinkers' "concept clusters" - specifically temporality, nature, and social roles - and suggestions are given for constructing typologies that sort (...)
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  2. Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson (2005). Anthropos and Ethics: Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177 - 185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  3. Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson (2005). Anthropos and Ethics Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177-185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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