Search results for 'Mark A. Walker' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Mark Walker
Profile: Mark Walker (New Mexico State University)
  1. Jerry Fodor, Garrett A., F. Merrill, Edward Walker, Parkes C. T. & H. Cornelia (1999). Against Definitions. In E. Margolis & S. Laurence (eds.), Concepts: Core Readings. The Mit Press. 263--367.score: 2400.0
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  2. Jerry Fodor, Garrett A., F. Merrill, Edward Walker, Parkes C. T. & H. Cornelia (1999). Concepts: Core Readings. The Mit Press.score: 2400.0
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  3. Mark Walker (2006). Mark Walker. Minerva 44 (3):241-250.score: 1440.0
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  4. Mark A. Schroll & Heather Walker (2011). Diagnosing the Human Superiority Complex: Providing Evidence the Eco-Crisis is Born of Conscious Agency. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):39-48.score: 1260.0
    This article is an amendment to Drengson (2011) that offers examples from fieldwork and reporting of practices influenced by the technocratic paradigm. Specifically (1) Krippner's work with Brazilian shamans and the theft of their tribal knowledge by the biotechnology industry that Krippner refers to as ecopiratism. (2) Hitchcock's field research with indigenous populations in the northwestern Kalahari Desert region of southern Africa and his documented assault of these indigenous peoples by private companies that Hitchcock refers to as developmental genocide. And (...)
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  5. Mark A. Walker & M. Milan (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285 – 307.score: 960.0
    Evidence for instances of astrophysical 'fine tuning' (or 'coincidences') is thought by some to lend support to the design argument (i.e. the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). We assess some of the relevant empirical and conceptual issues. We argue that astrophysical fine tuning calls for some explanation, but this explanation need not appeal to the design argument. A clear and strict separation of the issue of anthropic fine tuning on one hand and any form of (...)
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  6. Mark Walker & Milan Cirkovic, Anthropic Reasoning and the Contemporary Design Argument in Astrophysics: A Reply to Robert Klee.score: 900.0
    In a recent study of astrophysical “fine-tunings” (or “coincidences”), Robert Klee critically assesses the support that such astrophysical evidence might be thought to lend to the design argument (i.e., the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). Klee argues that a proper assessment indicates that the universe is not as “fine-tuned” as advertised by proponents of the design arguments. We argue (i) that Klee’s assessment of the data is, to a certain extent, problematic; and (ii) even if (...)
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  7. Mark Thomas Walker (2003). A Problem for Causal Theories of Action. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):84–108.score: 900.0
    Philosophical accounts of "action" standardly take an action to be a doing which _satisfies some description that is semantically related to the content of a propositional attitude of the subject's which _explains why that doing occurred. Causal theories of action require that the explanation in question must involve the causation of action-doings by propositional attitudes (typically intentions, volitions, or combinations of belief and desire). I argue that there are actions whose status, as such, cannot be acknowledged by any causal theory, (...)
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  8. Mark Thomas Walker (forthcoming). The Real Reason Why the Prisoner's Dilemma is Not a Newcomb Problem. Philosophia:1-19.score: 900.0
    It is commonly thought, in line with the position defended in an influential paper by David Lewis, that the decision problems faced in the prisoner’s dilemma and the Newcomb situation are essentially the same problem. José Luis Bermúdez has recently attacked the case Lewis makes for this claim. While I think the claim is false, I contend that Bermúdez’s reason for rejecting Lewis’s argument is inadequate, and then outline what I take to be a better reason for doing so.
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  9. Teresa A. Meade & Mark Walker (eds.) (1991). Science, Medicine, and Cultural Imperialism. St. Martin's Press.score: 870.0
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  10. Mark A. Walker & Milan M. Ćirković (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285-307.score: 870.0
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  11. Mark A. Wilson, Julie Hanlon Rubio, Lisa Tessman, Mary M. Doyle Roche, James F. Keenan, Margaret Urban Walker, Jamie Schillinger, Jean Porter, Jennifer A. Herdt & Edmund N. Santurri (2014). Virtue and the Moral Life: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives. Lexington Books.score: 870.0
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  12. Mark Thomas Walker (1993). Punishment - a Tale of Two Islands. Ratio 6 (1):63-71.score: 810.0
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  13. Heidi Campbell & Mark Walker (2005). Religion and Transhumanism: Introducing a Conversation. Journal of Evolution and Technology 14 (2).score: 810.0
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  14. A. D. M. Walker & Mark Platts (1993). Moral Realities: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (170):107.score: 810.0
    First published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  15. A. Steiner & I. Walker (1990). The Pattern of Population Growth as a Function of Redundancy and Repair. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (2).score: 640.0
    A basic model of hierarchical structure, expressed by simple, linear differential equations, shows that the pattern of population growth is essentially determined by conditions of redundancy in the sub-structure of individuals. There does not exist any possible combination between growth rate and accident rate that could balance population numbers and/or the level of redundancy within the population; all possible combinations either lead to extinction or to positive population growth with a decline of the fraction of individuals with redundant substructure. Declining (...)
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  16. Margaret Urban Walker (2007). Moral Understandings: A Feminist Study in Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 600.0
    This is a revised edition of Walker's well-known book in feminist ethics first published in 1997. Walker's book proposes a view of morality and an approach to ethical theory which uses the critical insights of feminism and race theory to rethink the epistemological and moral position of the ethical theorist, and how moral theory is inescapably shaped by culture and history. The main gist of her book is that morality is embodied in "practices of responsibility" that express our (...)
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  17. Brent Simpson & Henry A. Walker (2002). Status Characteristics and Performance Expectations: A Reformulation. Sociological Theory 20 (1):24-40.score: 600.0
    Status characteristics theory predicts the emergence and structure of power and prestige orders in task groups from members' status attributes. This paper argues that application of the burden of proof assumption, central to the theory, is inconsistent with a key concept, generalized expectation state. A reformulation is proposed that eliminates the inconsistency and gives competing predictions for a wide range of situations. The reformulation predicts that, when not directly relevant to task performance, specific characteristics (e.g., athletic or analytical ability) have (...)
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  18. J. B. Grant, A. J. Mackinnon, H. Christensen & J. Walker (2009). Participants' Perceptions of Motivation, Randomisation and Withdrawal in a Randomised Controlled Trial of Interventions for Prevention of Depression. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):768-773.score: 600.0
    Aims and background: Little is known about how participants perceive prevention trials, particularly trials designed to prevent mental illness. This study examined participants’ motives for participating in a trial and their views of randomisation and the ability to withdraw from a randomised controlled trial (RCT) for prevention of depression. Methods: Participants were older adults reporting elevated depression symptoms (N = 900) living in urban and regional locations in Australia who had consented to participate in an RCT of interventions to prevent (...)
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  19. Margaret Urban Walker (1993). Thinking Morality Interpersonally: A Reply to Burgess-Jackson. Hypatia 8 (3):167 - 173.score: 600.0
    In a comment on my paper "Feminism, Ethics, and the Question of Theory" (Walker 1992), Keith Burgess-Jackson argues that I have misdiagnosed the problem with modern moral theory. Burgess-Jackson misunderstands both the illustrative-"theoretical-juridical"-model I constructed there and how my critique and alternative model answer to specifically feminist concerns. Ironically, his own view seems to reproduce the very conception of morality as an individually internalized action-guiding code of principles that my earlier essay argued is the conception central to modern (...)
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  20. Jeremy A. Frimer & Lawrence J. Walker (2008). Towards a New Paradigm of Moral Personhood. Journal of Moral Education 37 (3):333-356.score: 580.0
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  21. A. Tatossian & R. S. Walker (1987). Biography, or Life as a Story. Diogenes 35 (139):95-103.score: 580.0
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  22. Philip A. Joseph & Gordon R. Walker (1987). A Theory of Constitutional Change. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 7 (2):155-181.score: 580.0
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  23. A. D. M. Walker (1973). Goodness of a Kind and Goodness From a Point of View. Analysis 33 (5):156 - 160.score: 540.0
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  24. Nancy A. Walker (1991). [Book Review] a Very Serious Thing, Women's Humor and American Culture. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 17:473-492.score: 540.0
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  25. John A. Walker (1979). Support for a Memory – Not Spatial – Deficit After Hippocampal System Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):348-349.score: 540.0
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  26. A. Walker (2008). The Prospects for Sustainable Welfare East and West: A Potential Role for Social Quality. International Journal of Social Quality 1 (1).score: 540.0
     
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  27. Mark Walker (2009). The Anthropic Argument Against the Existence of God. Sophia 48 (4):351 - 378.score: 450.0
    If God is morally perfect then He must perform the morally best actions, but creating humans is not the morally best action. If this line of reasoning can be maintained then the mere fact that humans exist contradicts the claim that God exists. This is the ‘anthropic argument’. The anthropic argument, is related to, but distinct from, the traditional argument from evil. The anthropic argument forces us to consider the ‘creation question’: why did God not create other gods rather than (...)
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  28. Mark Thomas Walker (1996). The Voluntariness of Judgment. Inquiry 39 (1):97 – 119.score: 450.0
    While various items closely associated with belief, such as speech?acts of assertion, or what have recently been termed acts of ?acceptance?, can clearly be voluntary, it is commonly supposed that belief itself, being intrinsically truth?directed, is essentially passive. I argue that while this may be true of belief proper, understood as a kind of disposition, it is not true of acts of assent or ?judgment?. Judgments, I contend, must be deemed voluntary precisely because of their truth?aimedness, for in their case (...)
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  29. Mark Walker (2002). The Fourfold Root of Philosophical Skepticism. Sorites 14 (1):85-109.score: 450.0
    Knowledge may be defined in terms of four necessary conditions: belief, justification, truth and gettier. I argue that a form of philosophical skepticism may be raised with respect to each.
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  30. Mark D. Groza, Mya R. Pronschinske & Matthew Walker (2011). Perceived Organizational Motives and Consumer Responses to Proactive and Reactive CSR. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):639-652.score: 450.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as an effective way for firms to create favorable attitudes among consumers. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of proactive and reactive CSR on consumer responses, this research hypothesized that consumers’ perceived organizational motives (i.e., attributions) will mediate this relationship. It was also hypothesized that the source of information and location of CSR initiative will affect the motives consumers assign to a firms’ engagement in the initiative. Two experiments were conducted to test (...)
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  31. Mark Walker (2004). Skepticism and Nataturalism: Can Philosophical Skepticisim Be Scientifically Tested? Theoria 70 (1):62-97.score: 450.0
    It may be possible to scientifically test philosophical skepticism; at least this is what I shall maintain. The argument develops the naturalistic insight that there may be no particular reason to suppose that nature has selected Homo sapiens’ epistemic capacities such that we are ideally suited to forming a true theory of everything, or indeed, a true theory of much of anything. Just as chimpanzees are cognitively limited - there are many concepts, ideas, and theories beyond their grasp - so (...)
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  32. Mark Walker (2007). Superlongevity and Utilitarianism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):581 – 595.score: 450.0
    Peter Singer has argued that there are good utilitarian reasons for rejecting the prospect of superlongevity: developing technology to double (or more) the average human lifespan. I argue against Singer's view on two fronts. First, empirical research on happiness indicates that the later years of life are (on average) the happiest, and there is no reason to suppose that this trend would not continue if superlongevity were realized. Second, it is argued that there are good reasons to suppose that there (...)
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  33. Mark Walker, Uninsured: Heal Thyself.score: 450.0
    on writing prescriptions.[2] These two reasons indicate why there are obvious repercussions for those who do not have reasonable access to physicians’ services. Of course, the word ‘reasonable’ is important here. After all, there is the old joke—for those who enjoy gallows humor—that the U.S. has universal access to healthcare so long as one is willing to commit a crime to see the county jail’s physician, or make one’s self sick enough to qualify for emergency services. Putting aside such extraordinary (...)
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  34. Mark Thomas Walker (2003). The Freedom of Judgment. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (1):63-92.score: 450.0
    This is the sequel to my paper 'Against One Form of Judgment-Determinism' ( IJPS , May 2001), wherein I argued that theoretical rationalization, that is, the forming of judgments by way of inference from other judgments, cannot simply be identified with any kind of predetermination of conclusion-judgments by premise-judgments. Taking 'free' to mean 'neither mechanistically explicable nor random' (where something is mechanistically explicable if and only if it is either predetermined or probabilified in a certain way, and is random if (...)
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  35. Mark Walker (2014). Eugenic Selection Benefits Embryos. Bioethics 28 (5):214-224.score: 450.0
    The primary question to be addressed here is whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), used for both negative and positive trait selection, benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The phrase ‘potential supernumerary embryos’ is used to indicate that PGD is typically performed on a set of embryos, only some of which will be implanted. Prior to any testing, each embryo in the set is potentially supernumerary in the sense that it may not be selected for implantation. Those embryos that are not selected, and (...)
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  36. Mark Thomas Walker (2001). Against One Form of Judgment-Determinism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (2):199 – 227.score: 450.0
    Taking 'rationalized judgments' to be those formed by inference from other judgments, I argue against 'Extreme Determinism': the thesis that theoretical rationalization just is a kind of predetermination of 'conclusion-judgments' by 'premise-judgments'. The argument rests upon two key lemmas: firstly, that a deliberator - in this case, his/her assent to some proposition - to be predetermined (I call this the 'Openness Requirement'): secondly, that a subject's logical insight into his/her premise-judgments must enter into the explanation of any judgment s/he forms (...)
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  37. Mark Walker (2007). Happy-People-Pills and Prosocial Behaviour. Philosophica 79 (1):93-11.score: 450.0
    There is evidence from the empirical sciences that >happiness= B understood in the social scientists= sense of >positive affect=B leads to prosocial behaviour: the happiest amongst us are more likely to help others. There is also scientific evidence of a genetic component to positive affect: genetic differences can account for some of the observed variances in positive affect. Let us think of >happy-people-pills= as pharmacological agents, modeled on those with a genetic predisposition for high levels of positive affect, which will (...)
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  38. Mark Thomas Walker (2012). Kant, Schopenhauer and Morality: Recovering the Categorical Imperative. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 450.0
    Introduction : a great reversal? -- Justifying morality -- Groundwork 3 : an enigmatic text -- The second critique -- Groundwork 2 : rational nature as an end-in-itself? -- From rational agency to freedom -- From freedom to non-phenomenal -- From non-phenomenality to universality -- The identity of persons -- Recovering the categorical imperative.
     
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  39. Mary Jean Walker (2010). Addiction and Self-Deception: A Method for Self-Control? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):305-319.score: 420.0
    Neil Levy argues that while addicts who believe they are not addicts are self-deceived, addicts who believe they are addicts are just as self-deceived. Such persons accept a false belief that their addictive behaviour involves a loss of control. This paper examines two implications of Levy's discussion: that accurate self-knowledge may be particularly difficult for addicts; and that an addict's self-deceived belief that they cannot control themselves may aid their attempts at self-control. I argue that the self-deceived beliefs of addicts (...)
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  40. Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.score: 420.0
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory formation. Based on (...)
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  41. Mary Walker & Cynthia Townley (2012). Contract Cheating: A New Challenge for Academic Honesty? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):27-44.score: 420.0
    ‘Contract cheating’ has recently emerged as a form of academic dishonesty. It involves students contracting out their coursework to writers in order to submit the purchased assignments as their own work, usually via the internet. This form of cheating involves epistemic and ethical problems that are continuous with older forms of cheating, but which it also casts in a new form. It is a concern to educators because it is very difficult to detect, because it is arguably more fraudulent than (...)
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  42. Margaret Urban Walker (2002). Morality in Practice: A Response to Claudia Card and Lorraine Code. Hypatia 17 (1):174-182.score: 420.0
    : I briefly reprise a few themes of my bookMoral Understandingsin order to address some questions about responsibility and justification. I argue for a thoroughly situated and naturalized view of moral justification that warns us not to take moral universalism too easily at face value. I also argue for the significance of reports of experience, among other kinds of empirical evidence, in testing the habitability of moral forms of life.
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  43. Janet S. Walker (1992). “Greed is Good” ... Or is It? Economic Ideology and Moral Tension in a Graduate School of Business. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):273 - 283.score: 420.0
    This article reports the results of an exploratory investigation of a particular area of moral tension experienced by MBA students in a graduate school of business. During the first phase of the study, MBA students'' own perceptions about the moral climate and culture of the business school were examined. The data gathered in this first part of the study indicate that the students recognize that a central part of this culture is constituted by a shared familiarity with a set of (...)
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  44. Margaret Urban Walker (2004). Waiter, There's a Fly in My Soup! Reflections on the Philosophical Gourmet Report. Hypatia 19 (3):235 - 239.score: 420.0
    Editor's note: with this essay, Hypatia inaugurates a new column. We welcome musings on the state of the profession, the life of the independent scholar, political activism, teaching, publishing, or other topics of interest to feminist philosophers. We particularly invite submissions that pick up conversational threads begun by earlier contributions to the column, so that Musings becomes a forum for talking to one another. If you have an idea for the column, please tell us about it.
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  45. Margaret Urban Walker (1989). Moral Understandings: Alternative "Epistemology" for a Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 4 (2):15 - 28.score: 420.0
    Work on representing women's voices in ethics has produced a vision of moral understanding profoundly subversive of the traditional philosophical conception of moral knowledge. I explicate this alternative moral "epistemology," identify how it challenges the prevailing view, and indicate some of its resources for a liberatory feminist critique of philosophical ethics.
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  46. Matthew P. Walker (2005). Past, Present, and the Future: Discussions Surrounding a New Model of Sleep-Dependent Learning and Memory Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):87-104.score: 420.0
    Following on from the target article, which presented a new model of procedural skill memory development, in this response I will reflect on issues raised by invited commentators and further expound attributes of the model. Discussion will focus on: evidence against sleep-dependent memory processing, definitions of memory stages and memory systems, and relationships between memory enhancement, sleep-stages, dreaming, circadian time, and sleep-disorders.
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  47. Kathryn Walker (2012). A Troubled Reconciliation: A Critical Assessment of Tan's Liberal Cosmopolitanism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (1):63-77.score: 420.0
    Kok?Chor Tan argues for a conception of Liberal Cosmopolitanism that seeks to reconcile ideals of global justice and national partiality. I provide two objections to his luck egalitarian model of global justice: first, it fails to provide adequate space for legitimate cultural variation with respect to the understanding of and valuing of natural resources; and second, that its account of ideas of collective responsibility is restricted to a point at which it becomes unrecognizable and inefficacious. I conclude with some reflections (...)
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  48. Lawrence J. Walker & Thomas J. Moran (1991). Moral Reasoning in a Communist Chinese Society. Journal of Moral Education 20 (2):139-155.score: 420.0
    Abstract This study examined the cross?cultural universality of Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning development in the People's Republic of China??a culture quite different from the one out of which the theory arose. In particular, the applicability of the theory was evaluated in terms of its comprehensiveness and the validity of the moral stage model. Participants were 52 adolescents and adults, drawn from five groups: moral leaders, intellectuals, workers, college and junior high school students. In individual interviews they responded to hypothetical (...)
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  49. T. Walker (2010). Why We Should Not Set a Minimum Price Per Unit of Alcohol. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):107-114.score: 420.0
    In some places consumption of alcohol raises serious public health issues. One recent proposal for addressing these issues has been to set a minimum price at which a unit of alcohol can be sold. In this paper I argue that such a policy, while it may have substantial health benefits, is ethically problematic. This is primarily because it unfairly places considerable burdens on those already most disadvantaged in society. In addition, such policies are poorly targeted if our concern is with (...)
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