Search results for 'Mark Bennett' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alice S. Bennett (1990). Subcellular Studies Organelles Mark Carroll. Bioscience 40 (5):399-400.score: 120.0
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  2. Mark J. Bennett (2011). Hart and Raz on the Non-Instrumental Moral Value of the Rule of Law: A Reconsideration. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (5):603-635.score: 80.0
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  3. Peter Mitchell, Ulrich Teucher, Mark Bennett, Fenja Ziegler & Rebecca Wyton (2009). Do Children Start Out Thinking They Don't Know Their Own Minds? Mind and Language 24 (3):328-346.score: 80.0
    Various researchers have suggested that below 7 years of age children do not recognize that they are the authority on knowledge about themselves, a suggestion that seems counter-intuitive because it raises the possibility that children do not appreciate their privileged first-person access to their own minds. Unlike previous research, children in the current investigation quantified knowledge and even 5-year-olds tended to assign relatively more to themselves than to an adult (Studies 1 and 2). Indeed, children's estimations were different from ratings (...)
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  4. Teresa Phelps, Religious Fundamentalism, Peace Education, Juliet Bennett, Stijn Neuteleers, Daniel C. Henrich & Mark Reardon (2011). The Ethics of Storytelling: A Nation's Role in Victim/Survivor Storytelling. Ethical Perspectives 18 (2):169-195.score: 80.0
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  5. Christopher L. Edwards, Perrine Marie Ruby, Josie E. Malinowski, Paul D. Bennett & Mark T. Blagrove (2013). Dreaming and Insight. Frontiers in Psychology 4:979.score: 80.0
    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can (...)
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  6. Arthur W. Collins & Daniel C. Bennett (1966). Jonathan Bennett on Rationality: Two Reviews. Journal of Philosophy 63 (May):253-266.score: 80.0
     
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  7. Peter Gratton, Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Levi Bryant & Paul Ennis (2010). Interviews: Graham Harman, Jane Bennett, Tim Morton, Ian Bogost, Levi Bryant and Paul Ennis. Speculations 1 (1):84-134.score: 60.0
    The context for these interviews was a seminar [Peter Gratton] conducted on speculative realism in the Spring 2010. There has been great interest in speculative realism and one reason Gratton surmise[s] is not just the arguments offered, though [Gratton doesn't] want to take away from them; each of these scholars are vivid writers and great pedagogues, many of whom are in constant contact with their readers via their weblogs. Thus these interviews provided an opportunity to forward student questions about their (...)
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  8. Jonathan Bennett (2001). Conditionals and Explanations Jonathan Bennett. In Alex Byrne, Robert Stalnaker & Ralph Wedgwood (eds.), Fact and Value. Mit Press. 1.score: 60.0
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  9. Arnold Bennett (1996). Comment About Father McNabb From the Journal of Arnold Bennett, February 7, 1928. The Chesterton Review 22 (1/2):221-221.score: 60.0
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  10. John G. Bennett (2008/1991). Idiots in Paris: Diaries of J.G. Bennett and Elizabeth Bennett, 1949. Bennett Books.score: 60.0
     
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  11. John G. Bennett (1977/1988). John G. Bennett's Talks on Beelzebub's Tales. S. Weiser.score: 60.0
     
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  12. Vardit Ravitsky (2006). A Field Guide to Good Decisions: Values in Action, by Mark D. Bennett and Joan McIver Gibson. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (01):114-117.score: 40.0
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  13. Peter A. Schouls (1991). JA Cover and Mark Kulstad, Eds., Central Themes in Early Modern Philosophy: Essays Presented to Jonathan Bennett Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (3):165-167.score: 40.0
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  14. Mark Bennett Weintraub & Stanley Weintraub (1990). The Trial of John Brown: Barrie Stavis and History. Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 2 (2):163-176.score: 10.0
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  15. Michael Nelson & Edward N. Zalta (2009). Bennett and “Proxy Actualism”. Philosophical Studies 142 (2):277-292.score: 8.0
    Karen Bennett has recently argued that the views articulated by Linsky and Zalta (Philos Perspect 8:431–458, 1994) and (Philos Stud 84:283–294, 1996) and Plantinga (The nature of necessity, 1974) are not consistent with the thesis of actualism, according to which everything is actual. We present and critique her arguments. We first investigate the conceptual framework she develops to interpret the target theories. As part of this effort, we question her definition of ‘proxy actualism’. We then discuss her main arguments (...)
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  16. Neil Francis Delaney (2007). A Note on Intention and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Philosophical Studies 134 (2):103 - 110.score: 8.0
    The purpose of this note is to tidy up some matters concerning ascriptions of intention and the employment of the doctrine of double effect (henceforth DDE). I first argue that Jonathan Bennett’s efforts to show that DDE is a foolish doctrine are unsatisfactory. I then consider a puzzle of Mark Johnston’s that seems to pose a problem for the defender of DDE. I turn to possible solutions to the puzzle, criticize one, and then offer the one I find (...)
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  17. Sven Walter (2010). Cognitive Extension: The Parity Argument, Functionalism, and the Mark of the Cognitive. Synthese 177 (2):285-300.score: 8.0
    During the past decade, the so-called “hypothesis of cognitive extension,” according to which the material vehicles of some cognitive processes are spatially distributed over the brain and the extracranial parts of the body and the world, has received lots of attention, both favourable and unfavourable. The debate has largely focussed on three related issues: (1) the role of parity considerations, (2) the role of functionalism, and (3) the importance of a mark of the cognitive. This paper critically assesses these (...)
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  18. Adam Morton (2004). Indicative Versus Subjunctive in Future Conditionals. Analysis 64 (4):289–293.score: 8.0
    I present examples of future tense Adams pairs, pairs of conditionals relating the same antecedents and consequents which differ in truth value because one is an indicative conditional and one a subjunctive (counterfactual) conditional. This contradicts claims of Jonathan Bennett and others. I argue that the pairs do differ in that one is indicative and the other subjunctive, by appealing to several ways of marking this distinction.
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  19. Luke White & Claire Pajaczkowska (eds.) (2009). The Sublime Now. Cambridge Scholars.score: 8.0
    This edited collection had its origins in a two-day conference held at the Tate Britain, organised collaboratively by research staff and students at Middlesex University and the London Consortium in order to celebrate the 250th Anniversary of the publication of Edmund Burke's famous book on the sublime. The conference was funded by Middlesex University, the London Consortium and the Tate Britain's AHRC-funded "Sublime Object: Nature, Art and Language" research project. The conference set out to critically examine the legacy of the (...)
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  20. Bernard G. Prusak (2011). When Words Fail Us: Reexamining the Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):1-22.score: 8.0
    At least some (perhaps the most serious) moral problems, public as well as private, concern the ways in which we should construe and specify the problems we face. The present paper, as the subtitle indicates, reexamines the conscience of Huckleberry Finn, which means both that I provide a close reading of key chapters of Mark Twain’s great novel and that I engage Jonathan Bennett’s well-known and oft-cited paper, “The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn.” Bennett tells us, early in (...)
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  21. Andreas Elpidorou (2012). Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition. Avant 3 (1):145-160.score: 8.0
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  22. A. R. J. Fisher (2013). Bennett on Parts Twice Over. Philosophia 41 (3):757-761.score: 8.0
    In this paper I outline the main features of Karen Bennett’s (Australasian Journal of Philosophy 1–21, 2011) non-classical mereology, and identify its methodological costs. I argue that Bennett’s mereology cannot account for the composition of structural universals because it cannot explain the mereological difference between isomeric universals, such as being butane and being isobutane. I consider responses, which come at costs to the view.
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  23. Fulvio Gosso (2010). On the Potential Use of Cup-Marks. Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (2):205-220.score: 8.0
    The author, starting from what is currently known about cup-marks and their distribution in the north-western Italian alpine area, formulated a hypothesis on their material and ritual functions in the Neolithic period. It is conceivable that cup-marks were originally carved in connection with the ritual use of Amanita muscaria, and that they may later have assumed other functions as well.
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  24. Alan Van Wyk (2012). What Matters Now? Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (2):130-136.score: 8.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-US; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Review of Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things.
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  25. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 8.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  26. Val Brooks (2004). Double Marking Revisited. British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (1):29 - 46.score: 8.0
    In 2002, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) published the report of an independent panel of experts into maintaining standards at Advanced Level (A-Level). One of its recommendations was for: 'limited experimental double marking of scripts in subjects such as English to determine whether the strategy would significantly reduce errors of measurement' (p. 24). This recommendation provided the impetus for this paper which reviews the all but forgotten literature on double marking and considers its relevance now.
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  27. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2013). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 8.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
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  28. Feliz Molina (2013). Readymades in the Social Sphere: An Interview with Daniel Peltz. Continent 3 (1):17-24.score: 8.0
    Since 2008 I have been closely following the conceptual/performance/video work of Daniel Peltz. Gently rendered through media installation, ethnographic, and performance strategies, Peltz’s work reverently and warmly engages the inner workings of social systems, leaving elegant rips and tears in any given socio/cultural quilt. He engages readymades (of social and media constructions) and uses what are identified as interruptionist/interventionist strategies to disrupt parts of an existing social system, thus allowing for something other to emerge. Like the stereoscope that requires two (...)
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  29. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2012). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 8.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
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  30. Mark Rowlands (2009). Extended Cognition and the Mark of the Cognitive. Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):1 – 19.score: 7.0
    According to the thesis of the extended mind (EM) , at least some token cognitive processes extend into the cognizing subject's environment in the sense that they are (partly) composed of manipulative, exploitative, and transformative operations performed by that subject on suitable environmental structures. EM has attracted four ostensibly distinct types of objection. This paper has two goals. First, it argues that these objections all reduce to one basic sort: all the objections can be resolved by the provision of an (...)
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  31. David Sobel (2009). Review of Mark Schroeder, Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).score: 7.0
    I assess Schroeder's book Slaves of the Passions and isolate some grounds for concerns about the overall position.
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  32. Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta (1999). Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's. Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.score: 7.0
    <span class='Hi'>Mark</span> Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does (...)
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  33. Mark F. Sharlow, The Philosophical Work of Mark Sharlow: An Introduction and Guide.score: 7.0
    Provides an overview of Mark Sharlow's philosophical work with summaries of his positions. Includes references and links to his writings.
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  34. Mark F. Sharlow, The Unfinishable Scroll and Beyond: Mark Sharlow's Blogs, July 2008 to March 2011.score: 7.0
    An archive of Mark Sharlow's two blogs, "The Unfinishable Scroll" and "Religion: the Next Version." Covers Sharlow's views on metaphysics, epistemology, mind, science, religion, and politics. Includes topics and ideas not found in his papers.
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  35. Mark Allison (2014). The Making of British Socialism by Mark Bevir, And: Karl Marx: A Nineteenth-Century Lifeby Jonathan Sperber (Review). Utopian Studies 25 (1):221-226.score: 7.0
    In the twenty-four years since the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, a body of high-quality scholarship on socialism has slowly accumulated. Here I discuss two superb additions to this incipient post–Cold War canon, Mark Bevir’s The Making of British Socialism and Jonathan Sperber’s Karl Marx: A Nineteenth Century Life. Both authors take it as axiomatic that the socialist utopia, with its quasi-eschatological promise of complete human emancipation, is an idea whose time has passed. But Bevir and, to a lesser (...)
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  36. Peter Smith (1982). Bennett's Belief. Philosophical Studies 41 (May):431-442.score: 7.0
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  37. Richard J. Harris (1973). Answering Questions Containing Marked and Unmarked Adjectives and Adverbs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (3):399.score: 7.0
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  38. James McBain (2013). Ethics Without Morals: A Defense of Amorality, by Joel Marks. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):306-310.score: 7.0
  39. Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell (2007). A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell's Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.score: 7.0
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  40. William R. A. Brown & Zheng‐yao Xu (2009). The 'Kinetochore Maintenance Loop'—The Mark of Regulation? Bioessays 31 (2):228-236.score: 7.0
  41. Taylor Benjamin Worley (2011). Mark T. Conard, Ed. (2009) The Philosophy of the Coen Brothers. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):240-246.score: 7.0
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  42. Coleman T. Merryman & Frank Restle (1970). Perceptual Displacement of a Test Mark Toward the Larger of Two Visual Objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):311.score: 7.0
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  43. Charles A. Baker (1954). Interpolation Accuracy as a Function of Visual Angle Between Scale Marks. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):433.score: 7.0
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  44. Tim Crane (1998). Intentionality as the Mark of the Mental. In , Contemporary Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 229-251.score: 6.0
    ‘It is of the very nature of consciousness to be intentional’ said Jean-Paul Sartre, ‘and a consciousness that ceases to be a consciousness of something would ipso facto cease to exist’.1 Sartre here endorses the central doctrine of Husserl’s phenomenology, itself inspired by a famous idea of Brentano’s: that intentionality, the mind’s ‘direction upon its objects’, is what is distinctive of mental phenomena. Brentano’s originality does not lie in pointing out the existence of intentionality, or in inventing the terminology, which (...)
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  45. Daniel C. Dennett (2007). Philosophy as Naive Anthropology: Comment on Bennett and Hacker. In M. Bennett, D. C. Dennett, P. M. S. Hacker & J. R. & Searle (eds.), Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language. Columbia University Press.score: 6.0
    Bennett and Hacker’s _Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience_ (Blackwell, 2003), a collaboration between a philosopher (Hacker) and a neuroscientist (Bennett), is an ambitious attempt to reformulate the research agenda of cognitive neuroscience by demonstrating that cognitive scientists and other theorists, myself among them, have been bewitching each other by misusing language in a systematically “incoherent” and conceptually “confused” way. In both style and substance, the book harks back to Oxford in the early 1960's, when Ordinary Language Philosophy ruled, and (...)
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  46. Daan Evers (2011). Review of Mark Schroeder - Noncognitivism in Ethics. [REVIEW] Disputatio 4 (31):295-203.score: 6.0
    Review of Mark Schroeder's book Noncognitivism in Ethics.
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  47. Jonathan Dancy (2012). Response to Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):455-462.score: 6.0
    Response to Mark Schroeder’s Slaves of the passions Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9656-3 Authors Jonathan Dancy, The University of Reading, Reading, UK Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  48. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Concept of Mind: Underlying Nature, Reference-Fixing, and the Mark of the Mental. In Sandra Lapointe & Christopher Pincock (eds.), Innovations in the History of Analytical Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan.score: 6.0
    Perhaps the philosophical thesis most commonly associated with Brentano is that intentionality is the mark of the mental. But in fact Brentano often and centrally uses also what he calls ‘inner perception’ to demarcate the mental. In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Brentano’s conception of the interrelations between mentality, intentionality, and inner perception. According to this interpretation, Brentano took the concept of mind to be a natural-kind concept, with intentionality constituting the underlying nature of the mental (...)
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  49. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Consequentialism, Constraints and The Good-Relative-To: A Reply to Mark Schroeder. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (March 2009):1-9.score: 6.0
    Recently, it has been a part of the so-called consequentializing project to attempt to construct versions of consequentialism that can support agent-relative moral constraints. Mark Schroeder has argued that such views are bound to fail because they cannot make sense of the agent relative value on which they need to rely. In this paper, I provide a fitting-attitude account of both agent-relative and agent-neutral values that can together be used to consequentialize agent-relative constraints.
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  50. Joel Smith (2005). Review of M. R. Bennett & P. M. S. Hacker, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (454):391-394.score: 6.0
    In this long and detailed book Bennett and Hacker set themselves two ambitious tasks. The first is to offer a philosophical critique of, what they argue are, philosophical confusions within contemporary cognitive neuroscience. The second is to present a ‘conceptual reference work for cognitive neuroscientists who wish to check the contour lines of the psychological concept relevant to their investigation’ (p.7). In the process they cover an astonishing amount of material. The first two chapters present a critical history of (...)
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