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Mark C. Murphy [68]Mark Christopher Murphy [1]
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Profile: Mark Murphy (Georgetown University)
  1.  31
    Mark C. Murphy (2011). God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality. OUP Oxford.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations.
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  2.  7
    Mark C. Murphy (2015). Two Unhappy Dilemmas for Natural Law Jurisprudence. American Journal of Jurisprudence 60 (2):121-141.
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  3. Louise Antony, William Lane Craig, John Hare, Donald C. Hubin, Paul Kurtz, C. Stephen Layman, Mark C. Murphy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Richard Swinburne (2009). Is Goodness Without God Good Enough?: A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough contains a lively debate between William Lane Craig and Paul Kurtz on the relationship between God and ethics, followed by seven new essays that both comment on the debate and advance the broader discussion of this important issue. Written in an accessible style by eminent scholars, this book will appeal to students and academics alike.
     
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  4. Mark C. Murphy (2006). Natural Law in Jurisprudence and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Natural law is a perennial though poorly represented and understood issue in political philosophy and the philosophy of law. Mark C. Murphy argues that the central thesis of natural law jurisprudence--that law is backed by decisive reasons for compliance--sets the agenda for natural law political philosophy, which demonstrates how law gains its binding force by way of the common good of the political community. Murphy's work ranges over the central questions of natural law jurisprudence and political philosophy, including (...)
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  5.  63
    Mark C. Murphy (1999). The Simple Desire-Fulfillment Theory. Noûs 33 (2):247-272.
    It seems to be a widely shared view that any defensible desire-fulfillment theory of welfare must be framed not in terms of what an agent, in fact, desires but rather in terms of what an agent would desire under hypothetical conditions that include improved information. Unfortunately, though, such accounts are subject to serious criticisms. In this paper I show that in the face of these criticisms the best response is to jettison any appeal to idealized information conditions: the considerations put (...)
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  6.  55
    Mark C. Murphy (2002). A Trilemma for Divine Command Theory. Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):22-31.
  7.  52
    Mark C. Murphy (2009). Not Penal Substitution but Vicarious Punishment. Faith and Philosophy 26 (3):253-273.
    The penal substitution account of the Atonement fails for conceptual reasons: punishment is expressive action, condemning the party punished, and so is not transferable from a guilty to an innocent party. But there is a relative to the penal substitution view, the vicarious punishment account, that is neither conceptually nor morally objectionable. On this view, the guilty person’s punishment consists in the suffering of an innocent to whom he or she bears a special relationship. Sinful humanity is punished (...)
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  8.  56
    Mark C. Murphy (1998). Divine Command, Divine Will, and Moral Obligation. Faith and Philosophy 15 (1):3-27.
    In this article I consider the respective merits of three interpretations of divine command theory. On DCT1, S’s being morally obligated to φ depends on God’s command that S φ; on DCT2, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S be morally obligated to φ; on DCT3, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S φ. I argue that the positive reasons that have been brought forward in favor of DCT1 have implications theists would find disturbing and that (...)
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  9. Mark C. Murphy (1994). Acceptance of Authority and the Duty to Comply with Just Institutions: A Comment on Waldron. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (3):271–276.
  10. Mark C. Murphy (ed.) (2003). Alasdair Macintyre. Cambridge University Press.
    Alasdair MacIntyre's writings on ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of the social sciences and the history of philosophy have established him as one of the philosophical giants of the last fifty years. His best-known book, After Virtue (1981), spurred the profound revival of virtue ethics. Moreover, MacIntyre, unlike so many of his contemporaries, has exerted a deep influence beyond the bounds of academic philosophy. This volume focuses on the major themes of MacIntyre's work with critical expositions of MacIntyre's (...)
     
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  11.  4
    Mark C. Murphy (2004). An Essay on Divine Authority. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (214):202-204.
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  12. Mark C. Murphy (2011). God Beyond Justice. Ethics 2:408.
     
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  13. Mark C. Murphy (2011). God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations. The characteristic methodology of theistic ethics is to proceed by asking whether there are features of moral norms that can be adequately explained only (...)
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  14.  2
    Mark C. Murphy (2003). Natural Law Jurisprudence. Legal Theory 9 (4):241-267.
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  15.  9
    Mark C. Murphy (2005). Natural Law Theory. In Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Pub. 15--28.
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  16.  33
    Mark C. Murphy (2001). Natural Law, Consent, and Political Obligation. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):70-92.
    There is a story about the connection between the rise of consent theories of political obligation and the fall of natural law theories of political obligation that is popular among political philosophers but nevertheless false. The story is, to put it crudely, that the rise of consent theory in the modern period coincided with, and came as a result of, the fall of the natural law theory that dominated during the medieval period. Neat though it is, the story errs doubly, (...)
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  17.  29
    Mark C. Murphy (1997). The Conscience Principle. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:387-407.
    My aim is to defend the conscience principle: One ought never to act against the dictates of one’s conscience. In the first part of this paper, I explain what I mean by “conscience” and “dictate of conscience,” and I show that the notion that the conscience principle is inherently anti-authoritarian or inherently fanatical is mistaken. In the second part, I argue that the existence of mistaken conscience does not reduce the conscience principle to absurdity. In the third part, I present (...)
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  18.  72
    Mark C. Murphy (2003). Philippa Foot, Natural Goodness:Natural Goodness. Ethics 113 (2):410-414.
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  19.  75
    Mark C. Murphy (2002). Review: Natural Law Modernized. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):833-837.
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  20. Mark C. Murphy (2007). Philosophy of Law. Blackwell Pub..
    The Philosophy of Law is a broad-reaching text that guides readers through the basic analytical and normative issues in the field, highlighting key historical and contemporary thinkers and offering a unified treatment of the various issues in the philosophy of law. Enlivened with numerous, everyday examples to illustrate various concepts of law. Employs the idea of three central commonplaces about law - that law is a social matter, that law is authoritative, and that law is for the common good - (...)
     
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  21.  47
    Mark C. Murphy (2001). Divine Authority and Divine Perfection. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (3):155-177.
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  22.  53
    Mark C. Murphy (1997). Surrender of Judgment and the Consent Theory of Political Authority. Law and Philosophy 16 (2):115 - 143.
    The aim of this paper is to take the first steps toward providing a refurbished consent theory of political authority, one that rests in part on a reconception of the relationship between the surrender of judgment and the authoritativeness of political institutions. On the standard view, whatever grounds political authority implies that one ought to surrender one's judgment to that of one's political institutions. On the refurbished view, it is the surrender of one's judgment – which can plausibly be considered (...)
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  23. Mark C. Murphy (2006). Philosophy of Law: The Fundamentals. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _The Philosophy of Law_ is a broad-reaching text that guides readers through the basic analytical and normative issues in the field, highlighting key historical and contemporary thinkers and offering a unified treatment of the various issues in the philosophy of law. Enlivened with numerous, everyday examples to illustrate various concepts of law. Employs the idea of three central commonplaces about law - that law is a social matter, that law is authoritative, and that law is for the common good - (...)
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  24.  40
    Mark C. Murphy (1995). Was Hobbes a Legal Positivist? Ethics 105 (4):846-873.
  25.  21
    Mark C. Murphy (2004). Reply to Almeida. Religious Studies 40 (3):335-339.
    Michael J. Almeida offers two criticisms of the argument of my ‘A trilemma for divine command theory’. The first criticism is that I mistakenly assume the validity of the following inference pattern: property A is identical to property B; property B supervenes on property C; therefore, property A supervenes on property C. The second criticism is that I have misinterpreted the moral-supervenience thesis upon which I rely in making this argument. The first of Almeida's criticisms is completely untenable. The second (...)
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  26.  26
    Mark C. Murphy (2012). Restricted Theological Voluntarism. Philosophy Compass 7 (10):679-690.
    In addressing objections to the theological voluntarist program, the consensus response by defenders of theological voluntarism has been to affirm a restricted theological voluntarism on which some, but not all, important normative statuses are to be explained by immediate appeal to the divine will. The aim of this article is to assess the merits and demerits of this restricted view. While affirming the restricted view does free theological voluntarism from certain objections, it comes at the cost of committing the theological (...)
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  27. Mark C. Murphy (2001). Natural Law and Practical Rationality. Cambridge University Press.
    Natural law theory has been undergoing a revival, especially in political philosophy and jurisprudence. Yet, most fundamentally, natural law theory is not a political theory, but a moral theory, or more accurately a theory of practical rationality. According to the natural law account of practical rationality, the basic reasons for actions are basic goods that are grounded in the nature of human beings. Practical rationality aims to identify and characterize reasons for action and to explain how choice between actions worth (...)
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  28.  24
    Mark C. Murphy (2001). Dancy, Jonathan. Practical Reality. Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):388-390.
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  29. Robert C. Solomon & Mark C. Murphy (eds.) (2000). What is Justice?: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.
    What is Justice? Classic and Contemporary Readings, 2/e, brings together many of the most prominent and influential writings on the topic of justice, providing an exceptionally comprehensive introduction to the subject. It places special emphasis on "social contract" theories of justice, both ancient and modern, culminating in the monumental work of John Rawls and various responses to his work. It also deals with questions of retributive justice and punishment, topics that are often excluded from other volumes on justice. This new (...)
     
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  30.  27
    Mark C. Murphy (2010). Introduction of the Aquinas Medalist Alasdair MacIntyre. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:19-21.
  31.  22
    Mark C. Murphy (2000). Hobbes on the Evil of Death. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 82 (1):36-61.
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  32.  24
    Mark C. Murphy (1999). Functioning and Flourishing. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 73:193-206.
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  33.  4
    Mark C. Murphy (2014). God and Moral Obligation, by C. Stephen Evans. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):112-117.
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  34.  28
    Mark C. Murphy (2009). Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Morality Without God. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
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  35.  27
    Mark C. Murphy (2009). Book Reviews:Justice: Rights and Wrongs. [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (2):402-407.
  36.  18
    Mark C. Murphy (2003). Pro-Choice and Presumption. Faith and Philosophy 20 (2):240-242.
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  37.  23
    Mark C. Murphy (2005). The Common Good. Review of Metaphysics 59 (1):3 - 18.
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  38.  27
    Mark C. Murphy (2000). Desire and Ethics in Hobbes's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2).
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  39.  6
    Mark C. Murphy (2007). Finnis on Nature, Reason, God. Legal Theory 13 (3-4):187-209.
    It is often claimed that John Finnis's natural law theory is detachable from the ultimate theistic explanation that he offers in the final chapter of Natural Law and Natural Rights . My aim in this paper is to think through the question of the detachability of Finnis's theistic explanation of the natural law from the remainder of his natural law view, both in Natural Law and Natural Rights and beyond. I argue that Finnis's theistic explanation of the natural law as (...)
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  40.  14
    Mark C. Murphy (1995). Self-Evidence, Human Nature, and Natural Law. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (3):471-484.
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  41.  18
    Mark C. Murphy (1993). Hobbes' Shortsightedness Account of Conflict. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):239-253.
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  42.  12
    Mark C. Murphy (1995). Philosophical Anarchism and Legal Indifference. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2):195 - 198.
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  43.  9
    Mark C. Murphy (1997). Natural Law and Moral Philosophy. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):635-638.
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  44.  5
    Mark C. Murphy (1995). Hobbes on Conscientious Disobedience. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 77 (3):263-284.
    In _Leviathan Hobbes offers an argument for the conclusion that one is bound to obey one's sovereign even when one judges that obedience to the sovereign's command would require one to disobey a law of God. The basis for Hobbes's argument is his contention that the covenant that institutes sovereignty includes the renunciation of the right to act in accordance with one's private conscience. In this paper I show that Hobbes's argument fails because one that takes the law of the (...)
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  45.  2
    Mark C. Murphy (2003). 6 Maclntyre's Political Philosophy. In Alasdair Macintyre. Cambridge University Press 152.
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  46.  3
    Mark C. Murphy (2010). Philosophy and Language. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:19-21.
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  47.  3
    Mark C. Murphy (2002). Natural Law Modernized. Mind 111 (444):833-837.
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  48.  4
    Mark C. Murphy (1994). Hobbes on Tacit Covenants. Hobbes Studies 7 (1):69-94.
    Tacit consent theories of political obligation have fallen into disfavor. The difficulties that plague such accounts have been well-known since Hume's "Of the Original Contract"1 and have recently been forcefully reformulated by M. B. E. Smith, A. John Simmons, and Joseph Raz.2 In this article, though, I shall argue that Hobbes' version of the argument from tacit consent escapes the criticisms leveled by Hume, Smith, Simmons, and Raz against tacit consent theories as a class. Crucial to my defense of this (...)
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  49.  6
    Mark C. Murphy (2000). Desire and Ethics in Hobbes's Leviathan : A Response to Professor Deigh. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):259-268.
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  50.  5
    Mark C. Murphy (1994). Deviant Uses of "Obligation" in Hobbes' "Leviathan". History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (3):281 - 294.
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