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Mark DeBellis [8]Mark Andrew DeBellis [1]
  1. Mark Debellis (2004). Review: Themes in the Philosophy of Music. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (452):747-750.
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  2. Mark DeBellis (2003). Schenkerian Analysis and the Intelligent Listener. The Monist 86 (4):579-607.
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  3. Mark DeBellis (2002). Musical Analysis as Articulation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):119–135.
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  4. Mark DeBellis (2001). Music. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  5. Mark DeBellis (1999). The Paradox of Music Analysis. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:209-217.
    Music analysis raises interesting problems for the theory of mental representation and meaning, and poses new challenges for epistemology. When an analysis purports to show the structure an analyst or reader hears a piece as having, what relation must thereby hold between hearing and analysis, and how does the analyst or reader know that it does? A paradox of analysis arises: if an analysis correctly captures the information content of a hearing, then it is bound to be uninformative. The solution (...)
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  6. Mark DeBellis (1999). What is Musical Intuition? Tonal Theory as Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):471 – 501.
    Lerdahl and Jackendoff's Generative Theory of Tonal Music (GTTM) is an important contribution to cognitive science. Jackendoff claims it is a computationalist theory and that the mental representations it postulates are unconscious. Thus GTTM looks to be a kind of cognitive science remote from the folk-psychological. I argue that this picture of GTTM is mistaken: GTTM is at least as much music analysis as cognitive science. Jackendoff's metatheory fails to explain how a listener can tell that a structural description corresponds (...)
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  7. Mark Andrew DeBellis (1995). Music and Conceptualization. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a philosophical study of the relations between hearing and thinking about music. The central problem it addresses is as follows: how is it possible to talk about what a listener perceives in terms that the listener does not recognise? By applying the concepts and techniques of analytic philosophy the author explores the ways in which musical hearing may be described as nonconceptual, and how such mental representation contrasts with conceptual thought. The author is both philosopher and musicologist (...)
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  8. Mark DeBellis (1991). The Representational Content of Musical Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (June):303-24.
  9. Mark Debellis (1991). Conceptions of Musical Structure. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):378-393.
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