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Profile: Mark Edward Greene (University of Delaware, Bristol University, University of Hull, Johns Hopkins University)
  1. Mark Greene (2013). Saving a Life but Losing the Patient. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (6):479-498.
    Gregor Samsa awakes to find himself transformed into a gigantic bug. The creature’s inchoate flailing leads Gregor’s sister to conclude that Gregor is no more, having been replaced by a brute beast lacking any vestige of human understanding. Sadly, real cases of brain injury and disease can lead to psychological metamorphoses so profound that we cannot easily think that the survivor is the person we knew. I argue that there can be cases in which statements like, “It’s just not Gregor (...)
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  2. Mark Greene (2011). 'Chocolate' and Other Kind Terms: Implications for Semantic Externalism. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):270-292.
    How do people manage to refer to chocolate, despite knowing so little about it? Traditional semantic externalism gives a two-part answer, a negative claim that meanings are not determined inside speakers' heads, and a positive claim that meanings are fixed by external factors. This gets the semantics of ‘chocolate’ half right: the negative claim is correct, but the positive claim is not. There is nothing special about ‘chocolate’, and scientifically respectable natural-kind terms also fail to live up to the positive (...)
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  3. Mark Greene (2011). On the Origin of Species Notions and Their Ethical Limitations. In Tom L. Beauchamp & R. G. Frey (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford University Press. 577-602.
    I argue that defenders of general duties of species preservation are faced with an impossible task. I distinguish derivative from non-derivative value and argue that the derivative value of species can yield only limited and contingent duties of preservation. There can be no general duty of species preservation unless all species have non-derivative value. Ongoing controversy over the ’species’ notion has not deterred some from claiming settled authority for whatever notion appears most conducive to their favored account of species value. (...)
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  4. Mark Greene & Steven Augello (2011). Everworse: What's Wrong with Selecting for Disability? Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):131-140.
    In this paper we challenge the moral consensus against selection for disability. Our discussion will concern only those disabilities that are compatible with a life worth living from the point of view of the disabled individual. We will argue that an influential, impersonal argument against selection for disability falls to a counterexample. We will then show how the reach of the counterexample can be broadened to make trouble for anyone who objects to selection for disability. If we are right about (...)
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  5. Mark Greene (2009). Choosing Future People: Reproductive Technologies and Identity. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company. 307-317.
    Reproductive technologies do not allow us to choose future people, but they do change who will exist. Confusion arises because of the different senses in which ”identity’ is used in ethical debate. I distinguish qualitative, cultural, and numerical identity. Reproductive choices do impact the qualitative features of children in ways that affect wellbeing, both directly and indirectly via cultural identification. I explain how the nonidentity problem makes it difficult to say what, if anything, is wrong with risky reproductive choices, and (...)
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  6. William J. FitzPatrick, Cheryl Misak, Mark Greene, Daniel Statman, Brian Barry & Kimberley Brownlee (2008). 10. Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health Kristin Shrader‐Frechette, Taking Action, Saving Lives: Our Duties to Protect Environmental and Public Health (Pp. 757-761). [REVIEW] Ethics 118 (4).
     
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  7. Mark Greene (2008). The Indeterminacy of Loss. Ethics 118 (4):633-658.
    Abstract: This paper argues that continua of both genetic and environmental manipulation give rise to cases in which it is indeterminate whether the non-identity problem arises. In clear non-identity cases, impersonal principles can underwrite intuitions of wrongdoing. In clear cases of ordinary personal harm, ordinary ethical thinking about personal compensation augments or supersedes impersonal considerations. Indeterminate cases raise a special problem because it is indeterminate whether personal ethical considerations apply. Might indeterminacy of identity preclude a determinate and ethically justified resolution (...)
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  8. Mark Greene & Suzanne M. Smith (2008). Consenting to Uncertainty: Challenges for Informed Consent to Disease Screening—a Case Study. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):371-386.
    This paper uses chronic beryllium disease as a case study to explore some of the challenges for decision-making and some of the problems for obtaining meaningful informed consent when the interpretation of screening results is complicated by their probabilistic nature and is clouded by empirical uncertainty. Although avoidance of further beryllium exposure might seem prudent for any individual whose test results suggest heightened disease risk, we will argue that such a clinical precautionary approach is likely to be a mistake. Instead, (...)
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  9. Mark Greene (2006). To Restore Faith and Trust: Justice and Biological Access to Cellular Therapies. Hastings Center Report 36 (1):57-63.
    Stem cell therapies should be available to people of all ethnicities. However, most cells used in the clinic will probably come from lines of cells stored in stem cell banks, which may end up benefiting the majority group most. The solution is to seek additional funding, earmarked for lines that will benefit minorities and offered as a public expression of apology for past discrimination.
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  10. Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller (2005). Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting. Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  11. Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman-House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Mark Greene, Patricia King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel & Davor Solter (2003). Safety Issues In Cell-Based Intervention Trials. Fertility and Sterility 80 (5):1077-1085.
    We report on the deliberations of an interdisciplinary group of experts in science, law, and philosophy who convened to discuss novel ethical and policy challenges in stem cell research. In this report we discuss the ethical and policy implications of safety concerns in the transition from basic laboratory research to clinical applications of cell-based therapies derived from stem cells. Although many features of this transition from lab to clinic are common to other therapies, three aspects of stem cell biology pose (...)
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  12. Ruth R. Faden, Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman‐House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao‐Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel, Davor Solter, Sonia M. Suter, Catherine M. Verfaillie, Leroy B. Walters & John D. Gearhart (2003). Public Stem Cell Banks: Considerations of Justice in Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
    If stem cell-based therapies are developed, we will likely confront a difficult problem of justice: for biological reasons alone, the new therapies might benefit only a limited range of patients. In fact, they might benefit primarily white Americans, thereby exacerbating long-standing differences in health and health care.
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  13. Hilary Bok Mueller Agnew, Danw Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao-Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'brien, David H. Sachs & Kathryn E. Schill (2003). Public Stem Cell Banks. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
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  14. Mark Greene (2002). New Dog: Old Tricks. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science 5 (3):239-242.
    A comment on the code of ethical practice of Genetic Savings & Clone, a companion animal cloning service.
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