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Profile: Mark Bernstein (Purdue University)
  1. Mark H. Bernstein (2013). A Response to MacClellan. Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (1):69-71.
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  2. Mark H. Bernstein (2011). Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship by Gary Steiner Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship Steiner Gary Columbia U Niversity Press, , New York, N Y 978-0-231-14234-2. [REVIEW] Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):96-98.
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  3. Mark H. Bernstein (2005). Can We Ever Be Really, Truly, Ultimately, Free? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):1-12.
  4. Mark H. Bernstein (2004). Without a Tear: Our Tragic Relationship with Animals. University of Illinois Press.
    The principle of gratuitous suffering -- The value of humans and the value of animals -- The holocaust of factory farming -- Hunting -- Animal experimentation -- The law and animals -- Women and animals.
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  5. Michael J. Almeida & Mark H. Bernstein (2000). Opportunistic Carnivorism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):205–211.
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  6. Mark H. Bernstein (1998). On Moral Considerability: An Essay on Who Morally Matters. Oxford University Press.
    In this fresh and powerfully argued book, Mark Bernstein identifies the qualities that make an entity deserving of moral consideration. It is frequently assumed that only (normal) human beings count. Bernstein argues instead for "experientialism"--the view that having conscious experiences is necessary and sufficient for moral standing. He demonstrates that this position requires us to include many non-human animals in our moral realm, but not to the extent that many deep ecologists champion.
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  7. Mark H. Bernstein (1983). Socialization and Autonomy. Mind 92 (January):120-123.
    A problem closely related to the perennial free will question is whether autonomy of persons can be reconciled with socialization. If this latter compatibilism can be established, It would have great bearing on the more general issue of freedom being reconcilable with determinism. In several recent articles robert young has tried to demonstrate the consistency of autonomy with socialization, But the author argues that he has failed to notice the depth and global nature of the socialization critic's position, And as (...)
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  8. Mark H. Bernstein (1981). Moral Responsibility and Free Will. Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):1-10.
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