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  1. Susan Blackmore, Thomas W. Clark, Mark Hallett, John-Dylan Haynes, Ted Honderich, Neil Levy, Thomas Nadelhoffer, Shaun Nichols, Michael Pauen, Derk Pereboom, Susan Pockett, Maureen Sie, Saul Smilansky, Galen Strawson, Daniela Goya Tocchetto, Manuel Vargas, Benjamin Vilhauer & Bruce Waller (2013). Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Lexington Books.
     
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  2. Mark Hallett (2013). What Does the Brain Know and When Does It Know It? In Gregg Caruso (ed.), Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Lexington Books. 255.
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  3. Roberta Ferrucci, Gaia Giannicola, Manuela Rosa, Manuela Fumagalli, Paulo Sergio Boggio, Mark Hallett, Stefano Zago & Alberto Priori (2012). Cerebellum and Processing of Negative Facial Emotions: Cerebellar Transcranial DC Stimulation Specifically Enhances the Emotional Recognition of Facial Anger and Sadness. Cognition and Emotion 26 (5):786-799.
  4. Mark Hallett (2010). Volition: How Physiology Speaks to the Issue of Responsibility. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. 61.
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  5. Mark Hallett (2009). Physiology of Volition. In Nancey Murphy, George Ellis, O. ’Connor F. R. & Timothy (eds.), Downward Causation and the Neurobiology of Free Will. Springer Verlag. 127--143.
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  6. Takashi Hanakawa, Manabu Honda & Mark Hallett (2004). Amodal Imagery in Rostral Premotor Areas. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):406-407.
    Inspired by Rick Grush's emulation theory, we reinterpreted a series of our neuroimaging experiments which were intended to examine the representations of complex movement, modality-specific imagery, and supramodal imagery. The emulation theory can explain motor and cognitive activities observed in cortical motor areas, through the speculation that caudal areas relate to motor-specific imagery and rostral areas embrace an emulator for amodal imagery.
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  7. Mark Hallett (1996). The Role of the Cerebellum in Motor Learning is Limited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):453.
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  8. Mark Hallett, Jordan Fieldman, Leonardo G. Cohen, Norihiro Sadato & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (1994). Involvement of Primary Motor Cortex in Motor Imagery and Mental Practice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):210.
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  9. Mark Hallett (1989). Experiment and Reality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):219.
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