Search results for 'Mark Henderson' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Ian H. Henderson (2013). Mark's Gospel and the Pre-History of Individuation. In Jörg Rüpke (ed.), The Individual in the Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean. Oup Oxford. 269.score: 360.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. W. Henderson (2000). Economics of the Mind A Review of The New Economic Criticism: Studies at the Intersection of Literature and Economics Edited by Martha Woodmansee and Mark Osteen. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):454-462.score: 360.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David K. Henderson & Terence Horgan (2011). The Epistemological Spectrum: At the Interface of Cognitive Science and Conceptual Analysis. OUP Oxford.score: 300.0
    David Henderson and Terence Horgan set out a broad new approach to epistemology, which they see as a mixed discipline, having both a priori and empirical elements. They defend the roles of a priori reflection and conceptual analysis in philosophy, but their revisionary account of these philosophical methods allows them a subtle but essential empirical dimension. They espouse a dual-perspective position which they call iceberg epistemology, respecting the important differences between epistemic processes that are consciously accessible and those that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mark Henderson, Yes, Genes Can Be Selfish.score: 300.0
    To mark the 30th anniversary of Richard Dawkins’s book, OUP is to issue a collection of essays about his work. Here, professor of psychology at Harvard University, wonders if Dawkins’s big idea has not gone far enough..
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Mark Henderson, How to Live to a Ripe Old Age Without Losing Your Marbles.score: 240.0
    “Without good brain function, living to age 100 is not an attractive proposition,” said Nir Barzilai, director of the college’s Institute for Ageing Research. “We’ve shown that the same gene variant that helps people live to exceptional ages has the added benefit of helping them think clearly.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. W. B. Inglis, G. H. Bantock, M. F. Cleugh, Thelma Veness, John Hayes, Peter Gosden, James L. Henderson, A. G. F. Beales, Mark Blaug, John Lawson & Evelyn E. Cowie (1969). Short Notices. British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (2):229-234.score: 240.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mark Brady, Williamson M. Evers, David Henderson & John Majewski Be (2006). The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History. By Thomas E. Woods, Jr. Washington: Regnery, 2004. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (2):65-86.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Annette Me Henderson, Mark A. Sabbagh & Amanda L. Woodward (2013). Preschoolers' Selective Learning is Guided by the Principle of Relevance. Cognition 126 (2):246-257.score: 240.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Mark K. Leach, Richard A. Henderson, Thomas J. Givnish, Alan K. Knapp, David C. Hartnett, Scott L. Collins & John M. Briggs (1999). A Caution Against Grazing. BioScience 49 (8):599.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. G. P. Henderson (1956). On a Certain Use of Quotation Marks. Philosophical Studies 7 (1-2):24 - 29.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert C. Hill (2007). Christology and Discipleship in the Gospel of Mark. By Suzanne Watts Henderson. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):625–626.score: 120.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul A. Roth (2005). Three Grades of Normative Involvement: Risjord, Stueber, and Henderson on Norms and Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (3):339-352.score: 54.0
    What makes for a good explanation of a person’s actions? Their reasons, or soa natural reply goes. But how do reasons function as part of explanations, that is, within an account of the causes of action? Here philosophers divide concerning the logical relation in which reasons stand to actions. For, tradition holds, reasons evaluatively characterized must be causally inert, inasmuch as the normative features cannot be found in any account of the empirical/descriptive. To countenance reasons as causes thus seems to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Albert Casullo (2014). Uncovering Buried Treasure: Henderson and Horgan on Conceptual Analysis. Philosophical Studies 169 (3):509-523.score: 54.0
    David Henderson and Terry Horgan offer a detailed account of the structure of conceptual analysis that is embedded within a more general account of a priori justification. Their account highlights an important feature of conceptual analysis that has been overlooked in the recent debate. Although it is generally recognized that conceptual analysis involves an inference from premises to the effect that some concept does (or does not) apply to a range of particular cases to a general conclusion about the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. F. Thomson (1959). Review: G. P. Henderson, On a Certain Use of Quotation Marks. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (3):266-266.score: 50.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mark Vessey (2009). John Henderson, The Medieval World of Isidore of Seville: Truth From Words. Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xi, 232; Black-and White Frontispiece and 7 Black-and-White Figures. $99. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (4):1060-1061.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Mark Saunders (ed.) (2010). Organizational Trust: A Cultural Perspective. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: List of figures; List of tables; Editors; Contributors; Editors' acknowledgements; Part I. The Conceptual Challenge of Researching Trust Across Different 'Cultural Spheres': 1. Introduction: unraveling the complexities of trust and culture Graham Dietz, Nicole Gillespie and Georgia Chao; 2. Trust differences across national-societal cultures: much to do or much ado about nothing? Donald L. Ferrin and Nicole Gillespie; 3. Towards a context-sensitive approach to researching trust in inter-organizational relationships Reinhard Bachmann; 4. Making sense of trust across (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Sven Walter (2010). Cognitive Extension: The Parity Argument, Functionalism, and the Mark of the Cognitive. Synthese 177 (2):285-300.score: 24.0
    During the past decade, the so-called “hypothesis of cognitive extension,” according to which the material vehicles of some cognitive processes are spatially distributed over the brain and the extracranial parts of the body and the world, has received lots of attention, both favourable and unfavourable. The debate has largely focussed on three related issues: (1) the role of parity considerations, (2) the role of functionalism, and (3) the importance of a mark of the cognitive. This paper critically assesses these (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andreas Elpidorou (2012). Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition. Avant 3 (1):145-160.score: 24.0
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. T. Schatzki (2005). Book Review: On Interpretive Social Inquiry. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (2):231-249.score: 24.0
    This essay addresses various issues about interpretive social investigation that arise in recent books by Berel Lerner and by Mark Risjord. The general topics considered are the relation between interpretation and explanation, the explanation of action, and alternative rationalities. Part 1 centers on Risjord’s attempt to draw interpretation into the explanatory enterprise, among other things pointing out the limiting assumptions of his account and asking whether social investigation has epistemologically significant practical ends. Part 2 addresses the roles of normativity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2013). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 24.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. José Andrés Quintero Restrepo (2012). Mark Twain y la verdad nociva. Escritos 20 (45):417-434.score: 24.0
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens o Mark Twain es el autor del Diario de Adán y Eva, Un yanki en la corte del rey Arturo, Las aventuras de Tom Sawyer, Las aventuras de Huckleberry Finn y otras. Este escritor norteamericano asumió la práctica literaria como un asunto que va más allá del entretenimiento: escribió para interpelar al lector. Y este detalle salta a la vista con un libro que rara veces es referenciado: Sobre la decadencia del arte de mentir, texto que (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Mark Rowlands (2009). Extended Cognition and the Mark of the Cognitive. Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):1 – 19.score: 21.0
    According to the thesis of the extended mind (EM) , at least some token cognitive processes extend into the cognizing subject's environment in the sense that they are (partly) composed of manipulative, exploitative, and transformative operations performed by that subject on suitable environmental structures. EM has attracted four ostensibly distinct types of objection. This paper has two goals. First, it argues that these objections all reduce to one basic sort: all the objections can be resolved by the provision of an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Sobel (2009). Review of Mark Schroeder, Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).score: 21.0
    I assess Schroeder's book Slaves of the Passions and isolate some grounds for concerns about the overall position.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta (1999). Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's. Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.score: 21.0
    <span class='Hi'>Mark</span> Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Mark F. Sharlow, The Philosophical Work of Mark Sharlow: An Introduction and Guide.score: 21.0
    Provides an overview of Mark Sharlow's philosophical work with summaries of his positions. Includes references and links to his writings.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mark F. Sharlow, The Unfinishable Scroll and Beyond: Mark Sharlow's Blogs, July 2008 to March 2011.score: 21.0
    An archive of Mark Sharlow's two blogs, "The Unfinishable Scroll" and "Religion: the Next Version." Covers Sharlow's views on metaphysics, epistemology, mind, science, religion, and politics. Includes topics and ideas not found in his papers.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Mark Allison (2014). The Making of British Socialism by Mark Bevir, And: Karl Marx: A Nineteenth-Century Lifeby Jonathan Sperber (Review). Utopian Studies 25 (1):221-226.score: 21.0
    In the twenty-four years since the dismantling of the Berlin Wall, a body of high-quality scholarship on socialism has slowly accumulated. Here I discuss two superb additions to this incipient post–Cold War canon, Mark Bevir’s The Making of British Socialism and Jonathan Sperber’s Karl Marx: A Nineteenth Century Life. Both authors take it as axiomatic that the socialist utopia, with its quasi-eschatological promise of complete human emancipation, is an idea whose time has passed. But Bevir and, to a lesser (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell (2007). A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell's Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.score: 21.0
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Taylor Benjamin Worley (2011). Mark T. Conard, Ed. (2009) The Philosophy of the Coen Brothers. Film-Philosophy 15 (1):240-246.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. William R. A. Brown & Zheng‐yao Xu (2009). The 'Kinetochore Maintenance Loop'—The Mark of Regulation? Bioessays 31 (2):228-236.score: 21.0
  31. Coleman T. Merryman & Frank Restle (1970). Perceptual Displacement of a Test Mark Toward the Larger of Two Visual Objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):311.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Tim Crane (1998). Intentionality as the Mark of the Mental. In , Contemporary Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 229-251.score: 18.0
    ‘It is of the very nature of consciousness to be intentional’ said Jean-Paul Sartre, ‘and a consciousness that ceases to be a consciousness of something would ipso facto cease to exist’.1 Sartre here endorses the central doctrine of Husserl’s phenomenology, itself inspired by a famous idea of Brentano’s: that intentionality, the mind’s ‘direction upon its objects’, is what is distinctive of mental phenomena. Brentano’s originality does not lie in pointing out the existence of intentionality, or in inventing the terminology, which (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daan Evers (2011). Review of Mark Schroeder - Noncognitivism in Ethics. [REVIEW] Disputatio 4 (31):295-203.score: 18.0
    Review of Mark Schroeder's book Noncognitivism in Ethics.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jonathan Dancy (2012). Response to Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):455-462.score: 18.0
    Response to Mark Schroeder’s Slaves of the passions Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9656-3 Authors Jonathan Dancy, The University of Reading, Reading, UK Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Concept of Mind: Underlying Nature, Reference-Fixing, and the Mark of the Mental. In Sandra Lapointe & Christopher Pincock (eds.), Innovations in the History of Analytical Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan.score: 18.0
    Perhaps the philosophical thesis most commonly associated with Brentano is that intentionality is the mark of the mental. But in fact Brentano often and centrally uses also what he calls ‘inner perception’ to demarcate the mental. In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Brentano’s conception of the interrelations between mentality, intentionality, and inner perception. According to this interpretation, Brentano took the concept of mind to be a natural-kind concept, with intentionality constituting the underlying nature of the mental (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Consequentialism, Constraints and The Good-Relative-To: A Reply to Mark Schroeder. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (March 2009):1-9.score: 18.0
    Recently, it has been a part of the so-called consequentializing project to attempt to construct versions of consequentialism that can support agent-relative moral constraints. Mark Schroeder has argued that such views are bound to fail because they cannot make sense of the agent relative value on which they need to rely. In this paper, I provide a fitting-attitude account of both agent-relative and agent-neutral values that can together be used to consequentialize agent-relative constraints.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Victor Loughlin (2013). Mark Rowlands, The New Science of the Mind: From Extended Mind to Embodied Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):891-897.score: 18.0
    Andy Clark once remarked that we make the world smart so we don’t have to be (Clark, 1997). What he meant was that human beings (along with many other animals) alter and transform their environments in order to accomplish certain tasks that would prove difficult (or indeed impossible) without such transformations. This remarkable insight goes a long way towards explaining many aspects of human culture, ranging from linguistic notational systems to how we structure our cities. It also provides the basis (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Tristram McPherson (2012). Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: Agent-Neutrality, Moral Epistemology, and Methodology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):445-453.score: 18.0
    Symposium contribution on Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. Argues that Schroeder's account of agent-neutral reasons cannot be made to work, that the limited scope of his distinctive proposal in the epistemology of reasons undermines its plausibility, and that Schroeder faces an uncomfortable tension between the initial motivation for his view and the details of the view he develops.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Melissa Barry (2010). Slaves of the Passions by Mark Schroeder. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 36 (2):225–228.score: 18.0
    In Slaves of the Passions, Mark Schroeder provides a systematic, rigorously argued defense of a Humean theory of reasons for action, taking pains to respond to influential objections to the view. While inspired by Hume, Schroeder makes it clear that he aims to develop a Humean theory, not necessarily one that Hume himself embraced, and for this reason little is said about Hume in the book. One respect in which Schroeder takes himself to be departing from Hume is in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David Enoch (2011). On Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: A Critical Notice of Slaves of the Passions. Philosophical Review 120 (3):423-446.score: 18.0
    In Slaves of the Passions Mark Schroeder puts forward Hypotheticalism, his version of a Humean theory of normative reasons that is capable, so he argues, to avoid many of the difficulties Humeanism is traditionally vulnerable to. In this critical notice, I first outline the main argument of the book, and then proceed to highlight some difficulties and challenges. I argue that these challenges show that Schroeder's improvements on traditional Humeanism – while they do succeed in making the view more (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Greg Restall, Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance, Appendix to Rebecca Kukla and Mark Lance 'Yo!' And 'Lo!': The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mark Addis (2008). Review of J. Mark Lazenby, The Early Wittgenstein on Religion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).score: 18.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mark Colyvan (2005). (Book Review) Ontological Independence as the Mark of the Real. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):216-225.score: 18.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Andreas Elpidorou (2013). Reasoning About the Mark of the Cognitive: A Response to Adams and Garrison. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines (2):1-11.score: 18.0
    I critically examine Adams and Garrison’s proposed necessary condition for the mark of the cognitive (Adams and Garrison in Minds Mach 23(3):339–352, 2013). After a brief presentation of their position, I argue not only that their proposal is in need of additional support, but also that it is too restrictive.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Andrew Alwood & Mark Schroeder (2009). From Outside of Ethics Richard, Mark . When Truth Gives Out . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 184. $55.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (4):805-813.score: 18.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bryan Norton, Paul B. Thompson, David Schmidtz, Elizabeth Willott & Mark Sagoff (2006). Mark Sagoff 's Price, Principle, and the Environment: Two Comments. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):337 – 372.score: 18.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Basil Smith (2001). Mark Timmons, Morality Without Foundations: A Defense of Ethical Contextualism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (2):269-273.score: 18.0
    In Morality Without Foundations, Mark Timmons argues that moral judgments (e.g. “cruelty is wrong”) have what he calls “evaluative assertoric content,” and so, are true or false. However, I argue that, even if correct, this argument renders moral truth or falsity mysterious.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mark Peacock (2011). Economic Methodology: Understanding Economics as a Science, Marcel Boumans and John B. Davis (with Contributions From Mark Blaug, Harro Maas and Andrej Svorencik), Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, X + 209 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):352-358.score: 18.0
  49. Robert May, Bad Words Remarks on Mark Richard “Epithets and Attitudes”.score: 18.0
    “Choose your words wisely,” my mother used to say, “because you never know who’s listening.” Oddly, this is something about which my dear mother and Mark Richard apparently would agree. They both seem to think that the words you use say something about who you are, and if you use bad words, then you are a bad person. About this, I have no doubt that they are right - those who use slurs, at least in the context of many (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David S. Miall (1997). The Body in Literature: Mark Johnson, Metaphor, and Feeling. Philosophical Explorations.score: 18.0
    An inadequate grasp of the role of imagination has vitiated understanding of human cognition in western thinking. Extending a project initiated with George Lakoff in _Metaphors we Live By_ (1980), Mark Johnson's book _The Body in the Mind_ (1987) offers the claim that all thinking originates in bodily experience. A range of schemata formed during our early experience manipulating a physical world of surfaces, distances, and forces, lays the foundation of later, more abstract modes of thought. In presenting his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000