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Profile: Mark Johnson (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
Profile: Mark Johnson (East Carolina University)
  1. Keith Anderson, Katherine Woods, William Alexander, Julian Ingram & Mark Johnson, Characters of the Dialogue.
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RECORDER'S PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
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  2. Mark H. Johnson & Leslie A. Tucker, The Emergence of the Social Brain Network: Evidence From Typical and Atypical Development.
    Several research groups have identified a network of regions of the adult cortex that are activated during social perception and cognition tasks. In this paper we focus on the development of components of this social brain network during early childhood and test aspects of a particular viewpoint on human functional brain development: “interactive specialization.” Specifically, we apply new data analysis techniques to a previously published data set of event-related potential ~ERP! studies involving 3-, 4-, and 12-month-old infants viewing faces of (...)
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  3. Mark L. Johnson, Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors.
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what attention is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) “cause” theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) “effect” theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition metaphor); and (c) hybrid theories that combine cause and (...)
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  4. Mark Johnson (2014). Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding From the Perspective of Cognitive Science. University of Chicago Press.
    What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a pragmatist philosophical framework in Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science, Mark Johnson argues that appealing solely to absolute principles and values is not only scientifically unsound but even morally suspect. (...)
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  5. Mark E. Johnson, Christiane Brems, Bridget L. Hanson, Staci L. Corey, Gloria D. Eldridge & Kristen Mitchell (2014). Conducting Ethical Research with Correctional Populations: Do Researchers and IRB Members Know the Federal Regulations? Research Ethics 10 (1):6-16.
    Conducting or overseeing research in correctional settings requires knowledge of specific federal rules and regulations designed to protect the rights of individuals in incarceration. To investigate the extent to which relevant groups possess this knowledge, using a 10-item questionnaire, we surveyed 885 IRB prisoner representatives, IRB members and chairs with and without experience reviewing HIV/AIDS correctional protocols, and researchers with and without correctional HIV/AIDS research experience. Across all groups, respondents answered 4.5 of the items correctly. Individuals who have overseen or (...)
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  6. Mark Johnson (2013). The Myth of the Moral Faculty: Response to Kirkby. Philosophical Psychology (4):1-5.
    David Kirkby argues that I have misrepresented Marc Hauser's conception of a moral faculty, in a way that invalidates my chief arguments against the existence and necessity of such a faculty. The core of Kirkby's challenge is that what Hauser lists as necessary conditions for the moral faculty to do its work are not themselves components of that faculty. I argue that there is no useful way to distinguish necessary conditions of moral judgments from the alleged moral faculty itself, and (...)
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  7. Mark William Johnson (2013). Time, Mechanisms and Technology: Challenges of Abstraction and Decision in Realist Economic Theory. Revue de Philosophie Économique 14 (1):105.
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  8. Mark Johnson (2012). Action, Embodied Meaning, and Thought. In Jay Schulkin (ed.), New Directions in Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Adaptation and Cephalic Expression. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  9. Mark H. Johnson (2012). Executive Function and Developmental Disorders: The Flip Side of the Coin. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (9):454-457.
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  10. Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.) (2011). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford.
    The human face is unique among social stimuli in conveying such a variety of different characteristics. A person's identity, sex, race, age, emotional state, focus of attention, facial speech patterns, and attractiveness are all detected and interpreted with relative ease from the face. Humans also display a surprising degree of consistency in the extent to which personality traits, such as trustworthiness and likeability, are attributed to faces. In the past thirty years, face perception has become an area of major interest (...)
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  11. Mark Johnson (2011). There is No Moral Faculty. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):409 - 432.
    Dewey's ethical naturalism has provided an exemplary model for many contemporary naturalistic treatments of morality. However, in some recent work there is an unfortunate tendency to presuppose a moral faculty as the alleged source of what are claimed to be nearly universal moral judgments. Marc Hauser's Moral minds (2006) thus argues that our shared moral intuitions arise from a universal moral organ, which he analogizes to a Chomskyan language faculty. Following Dewey's challenge to the postulation of the idea of universal (...)
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  12. Mark H. Johnson (2011). Face Perception: A Developmental Perspective. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oup Oxford. 1.
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  13. Evelyne Mercure, Kathrin Cohen Kadosh & Mark H. Johnson (2011). The N170 Shows Differential Repetition Effects for Faces, Objects, and Orthographic Stimuli. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
  14. Mayada Elsabbagh & Mark H. Johnson (2010). Getting Answers From Babies About Autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):81-87.
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  15. Mark Johnson (2010). Cognitive Science and Dewey's Theory of Mind, Thought, and Language. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  16. Atsushi Senju & Mark H. Johnson (2010). Is Eye Contact the Key to the Social Brain? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):458-459.
    Eye contact plays a critical role in many aspects of face processing, including the processing of smiles. We propose that this is achieved by a subcortical route, which is activated by eye contact and modulates the cortical areas involve in social cognition, including the processing of facial expression. This mechanism could be impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.
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  17. Sharon Goldwater, Thomas L. Griffiths & Mark Johnson (2009). A Bayesian Framework for Word Segmentation: Exploring the Effects of Context. Cognition 112 (1):21-54.
  18. Mark Johnson (2009). Review of Ted Cohen, Thinking of Others: On the Talent for Metaphor. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  19. Jennifer M. Moslemi, Krista A. Capps, Mark S. Johnson, Jude Maul, Peter B. McIntyre, April M. Melvin, Timothy M. Vadas, Dena M. Vallano, James M. Watkins & Marissa Weiss (2009). Training Tomorrow's Environmental Problem Solvers: An Integrative Approach to Graduate Education. Bioscience 59 (6):514-521.
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  20. Laura Weiss Roberts, Catherine Bruss, Christiane Brems, Mark E. Johnson, Sarah Dewane & Jane Smikowski (2009). Community-Based Participatory Research for Improved Mental Health. Ethics and Behavior 19 (6):461-478.
    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) focuses on specific community needs, and produces results that directly address those needs. Although conducting ethical CBPR is critical to its success, few academic programs include this training in their curricula. This article describes the development and evaluation of an online training course designed to increase the use of CBPR in mental health disciplines. Developed using a participatory approach involving a community of experts, this course challenges traditional research by introducing a collaborative process meant to encourage (...)
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  21. Atsushi Senju & Mark H. Johnson (2009). The Eye Contact Effect: Mechanisms and Development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):127-134.
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  22. Jane Smikowski, Sarah Dewane, Mark E. Johnson, Christiane Brems, Catherine Bruss & Laura Weiss Roberts (2009). Community-Based Participatory Research for Improved Mental Health. Ethics and Behavior 19 (6):461 – 478.
    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) focuses on specific community needs, and produces results that directly address those needs. Although conducting ethical CBPR is critical to its success, few academic programs include this training in their curricula. This article describes the development and evaluation of an online training course designed to increase the use of CBPR in mental health disciplines. Developed using a participatory approach involving a community of experts, this course challenges traditional research by introducing a collaborative process meant to encourage (...)
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  23. Mark Johnson (2008). Matthew Ratcliffe: Rethinking Commonsense Psychology: A Critique of Folk Psychology, Theory of Mind and Simulation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):313-315.
  24. Mark Johnson (2008). What Makes a Body? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (3):pp. 159-169.
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  25. Mark Johnson (2008). John Kekes,The Enlargement of Life: Moral Imagination at Work:The Enlargement of Life: Moral Imagination at Work. Ethics 118 (3):553-557.
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  26. Mark J. Johnson (2008). Observations on the Burial of the Emperor Julian in Constantinople. Byzantion 78:254-260.
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  27. Atsushi Senju, Gergely Csibra & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Understanding the Referential Nature of Looking: Infants' Preference for Object-Directed Gaze. Cognition 108 (2):303-319.
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  28. Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Précis of Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):321-331.
    Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition proposes a unifying framework for the study of cognitive development that brings together (1) constructivism (which views development as the progressive elaboration of increasingly complex structures), (2) cognitive neuroscience (which aims to understand the neural mechanisms underlying behavior), and (3) computational modeling (which proposes formal and explicit specifications of information processing). The guiding principle of our approach is context dependence, within and (in contrast to Marr [1982]) between levels of organization. We propose that three (...)
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  29. Victoria Southgate, Mark H. Johnson & Gergely Csibra (2008). Infants Attribute Goals Even to Biomechanically Impossible Actions. Cognition 107 (3):1059-1069.
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  30. Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal, Mark H. Johnson, Sylvain Sirois & Michael Spratling (2008). Studying Development in the 21st Century. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):345-356.
    In this response, we consider four main issues arising from the commentaries to the target article. These include further details of the theory of interactive specialization, the relationship between neuroconstructivism and selectionism, the implications of neuroconstructivism for the notion of representation, and the role of genetics in theories of development. We conclude by stressing the importance of multidisciplinary approaches in the future study of cognitive development and by identifying the directions in which neuroconstructivism can expand in the Twenty-first Century.
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  31. Kathrin Cohen Kadosh & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Developing a Cortex Specialized for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):367-369.
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  32. Teresa Farroni, Stefano Massaccesi, Enrica Menon & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Direct Gaze Modulates Face Recognition in Young Infants. Cognition 102 (3):396-404.
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  33. Mark Johnson (2007). Review of "Realising Systems Thinking: Knowledge and Action in Management Science". By John Mingers. New York: Springer, 2006. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 6 (2):312-315.
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  34. Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his pioneering (...)
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  35. Denis Mareschal, Mark H. Johnson, Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas & Gert Westermann (2007). Neuroconstructivism - I: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? The processes that occur along the way are so complex that any attempt to understand development necessitates a multi-disciplinary approach, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging - an approach till now seldom taken in the study of child development. -/- Neuroconstructivism is a major new 2 volume publication that seeks to redress this balance, presenting an integrative new framework (...)
     
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  36. Denis Mareschal, Sylvain Sirois, Gert Westermann & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Neuroconstructivism - II: Perspectives and Prospects. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? The processes that occur along the way are so complex that any attempt to understand development necessitates a multi-disciplinary approach, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging - an approach till now seldom taken in the study of child development. -/- Neuroconstructivism is a major new 2 volume publication that seeks to redress this balance, presenting an integrative new framework (...)
     
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  37. Mark Johnson (2006). Cognitive Science. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..
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  38. Mark Johnson (2006). La «Summa de poenitentia» attribuita a Paolo Ungaro. Divus Thomas 109 (2):136-145.
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  39. Mark L. Johnson (2004). A. E. Denham, Metaphor and Moral Experience:Metaphor and Moral Experience. Ethics 114 (2):344-346.
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  40. Michelle de Haan & Mark H. Johnson (2003). Neuropsychological Development. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  41. Jill Gordon & Markus Johnson (2003). Race, Speech, and a Hostile Educational Environment: What Color is Free Speech? Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):414–436.
  42. Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2003). The “What” and “Where” of Object Representations in Infancy. Cognition 88 (3):259-276.
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  43. Mark Johnson (2002). Cowboy Bill Rides Herd on the Range of Consciousness. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (4):256-263.
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  44. Mark Johnson & Stefan Riezler (2002). Statistical Models of Syntax Learning and Use. Cognitive Science 26 (3):239-253.
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  45. Mark Johnson (2001). The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):323-326.
  46. Mark Johnson (2000). St Thomas and the «Law of the Sin». Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales 67 (1):80-95.
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  47. Diego Fernandez-Duque & Mark Johnson (1999). Attention Metaphors: How Metaphors Guide the Cognitive Psychology of Attention. Cognitive Science 23 (1):83-116.
  48. Mark Johnson (1999). A Resource Sensitive Interpretation of Lexical Functional Grammar. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (1):45-81.
    This paper investigates whether the fundamental linguistic insights and intuitions of Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG), which is usually presented as a constraint-based linguistic theory, can be reformulated in a resource sensitive framework using a substructural modal logic. In the approach investigated here, LFG's f-descriptions are replaced with expressions from a multi-modal propositional logic (with permutation and possibly limited contraction). In effect, the feature structure unification basis of LFG's f-structures is replaced with a very different resource based mechanism. It turns out (...)
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  49. Mark Johnson (1999). Embodied Reason. In Gail Weiss & Honi Fern Haber (eds.), Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersections of Nature and Culture. Routledge. 81--102.
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  50. Mark J. Johnson (1999). Review: Martin Goldstern, Haim Judah, The Incompleteness Phenomenon. A New Course in Mathematical Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (3):1367-1368.
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