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Profile: Mark Johnson (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
Profile: Mark Johnson (East Carolina University)
  1. George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1999). Philosophy in the Flesh the Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought.
  2.  23
    Mark L. Johnson (1987). The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason. University of Chicago Press.
    "There are books—few and far between—which carefully, delightfully, and genuinely turn your head inside out. This is one of them. It ranges over some central issues in Western philosophy and begins the long overdue job of giving us a radically new account of meaning, rationality, and objectivity."—Yaakov Garb, _San Francisco Chronicle_.
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  3.  58
    Mark Johnson (1993). Moral Imagination: Implications of Cognitive Science for Ethics. University of Chicago Press.
    Using path-breaking discoveries of cognitive science, Mark Johnson argues that humans are fundamentally imaginative moral animals, challenging the view that morality is simply a system of universal laws dictated by reason. According to the Western moral tradition, we make ethical decisions by applying universal laws to concrete situations. But Johnson shows how research in cognitive science undermines this view and reveals that imagination has an essential role in ethical deliberation. Expanding his innovative studies of human reason in Metaphors We Live (...)
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  4.  81
    Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his pioneering (...)
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  5.  43
    Atsushi Senju & Mark H. Johnson (2009). The Eye Contact Effect: Mechanisms and Development. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):127-134.
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  6. Denis Mareschal, Mark H. Johnson, Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas & Gert Westermann (2007). Neuroconstructivism - I: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? Neuroconstructivism is a pioneering 2 volume work that sets out a whole new framework for considering the complex topic of development, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging.
     
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  7.  14
    Sharon Goldwater, Thomas L. Griffiths & Mark Johnson (2009). A Bayesian Framework for Word Segmentation: Exploring the Effects of Context. Cognition 112 (1):21-54.
  8.  2
    Mark H. Johnson, Suzanne Dziurawiec, Hadyn Ellis & John Morton (1991). Newborns' Preferential Tracking of Face-Like Stimuli and its Subsequent Decline. Cognition 40 (1-2):1-19.
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  9.  9
    Victoria Southgate, Mark H. Johnson & Gergely Csibra (2008). Infants Attribute Goals Even to Biomechanically Impossible Actions. Cognition 107 (3):1059-1069.
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  10. Keith Anderson, Katherine Woods, William Alexander, Julian Ingram & Mark Johnson, Characters of the Dialogue.
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 RECORDER'S PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
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  11.  31
    Mayada Elsabbagh & Mark H. Johnson (2010). Getting Answers From Babies About Autism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):81-87.
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  12.  33
    Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.) (2011). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford.
    In the past thirty years, face perception has become an area of major interest within psychology. The Oxford Handbook of Face Perception is the most comprehensive and commanding review of the field ever published.For anyone looking for the definitive review of this burgeoning field, this is the essential book.
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  13.  8
    Atsushi Senju, Gergely Csibra & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Understanding the Referential Nature of Looking: Infants’ Preference for Object-Directed Gaze. Cognition 108 (2):303-319.
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  14.  2
    Mark Johnson (1988). Out for the Count. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):589.
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  15.  13
    Mark H. Johnson & Leslie A. Tucker, The Emergence of the Social Brain Network: Evidence From Typical and Atypical Development.
    Several research groups have identified a network of regions of the adult cortex that are activated during social perception and cognition tasks. In this paper we focus on the development of components of this social brain network during early childhood and test aspects of a particular viewpoint on human functional brain development: “interactive specialization.” Specifically, we apply new data analysis techniques to a previously published data set of event-related potential ~ERP! studies involving 3-, 4-, and 12-month-old infants viewing faces of (...)
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  16.  85
    Mark Johnson (2011). There is No Moral Faculty. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):409 - 432.
    Dewey's ethical naturalism has provided an exemplary model for many contemporary naturalistic treatments of morality. However, in some recent work there is an unfortunate tendency to presuppose a moral faculty as the alleged source of what are claimed to be nearly universal moral judgments. Marc Hauser's Moral minds (2006) thus argues that our shared moral intuitions arise from a universal moral organ, which he analogizes to a Chomskyan language faculty. Following Dewey's challenge to the postulation of the idea of universal (...)
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  17. Denis Mareschal, Sylvain Sirois, Gert Westermann & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Neuroconstructivism - Ii: Perspectives and Prospects. OUP Oxford.
    What are the processes, from conception to adulthood, that enable a single cell to grow into a sentient adult? Neuroconstructivism is a pioneering 2 volume work that sets out a whole new framework for considering the complex topic of development, integrating data from cognitive studies, computational work, and neuroimaging.
     
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  18. Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2003). The “What” and “Where” of Object Representations in Infancy. Cognition 88 (3):259-276.
  19.  22
    Mark H. Johnson (2012). Executive Function and Developmental Disorders: The Flip Side of the Coin. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (9):454-457.
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  20. George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1980). Conceptual Metaphor in Everyday Language. Journal of Philosophy 77 (8):453-486.
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  21.  4
    Teresa Farroni, Stefano Massaccesi, Enrica Menon & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Direct Gaze Modulates Face Recognition in Young Infants. Cognition 102 (3):396-404.
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  22.  48
    Mark Johnson (2014). Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding From the Perspective of Cognitive Science. University of Chicago Press.
    What is the difference between right and wrong? This is no easy question to answer, yet we constantly try to make it so, frequently appealing to some hidden cache of cut-and-dried absolutes, whether drawn from God, universal reason, or societal authority. Combining cognitive science with a pragmatist philosophical framework in Morality for Humans: Ethical Understanding from the Perspective of Cognitive Science, Mark Johnson argues that appealing solely to absolute principles and values is not only scientifically unsound but even morally suspect. (...)
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  23.  33
    Kathrin Cohen Kadosh & Mark H. Johnson (2007). Developing a Cortex Specialized for Face Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):367-369.
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  24.  76
    Diego Fernandez-Duque & Mark Johnson (1999). Attention Metaphors: How Metaphors Guide the Cognitive Psychology of Attention. Cognitive Science 23 (1):83-116.
  25. Mark Johnson (2010). Cognitive Science and Dewey's Theory of Mind, Thought, and Language. In Molly Cochran (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press
     
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  26.  19
    Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson (2008). Précis of Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):321-331.
    Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition proposes a unifying framework for the study of cognitive development that brings together (1) constructivism (which views development as the progressive elaboration of increasingly complex structures), (2) cognitive neuroscience (which aims to understand the neural mechanisms underlying behavior), and (3) computational modeling (which proposes formal and explicit specifications of information processing). The guiding principle of our approach is context dependence, within and (in contrast to Marr [1982]) between levels of organization. We propose that three (...)
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  27.  6
    George Lakoff & Mark Johnson (1980). The Metaphorical Structure of the Human Conceptual System. Cognitive Science 4 (2):195-208.
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  28. Mark Johnson (1988). Attribute-Value Logic and the Theory of Grammar. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  29. Mark E. Johnson, Christiane Brems, Bridget L. Hanson, Staci L. Corey, Gloria D. Eldridge & Kristen Mitchell (2014). Conducting Ethical Research with Correctional Populations: Do Researchers and IRB Members Know the Federal Regulations? Research Ethics 10 (1):6-16.
    Conducting or overseeing research in correctional settings requires knowledge of specific federal rules and regulations designed to protect the rights of individuals in incarceration. To investigate the extent to which relevant groups possess this knowledge, using a 10-item questionnaire, we surveyed 885 IRB prisoner representatives, IRB members and chairs with and without experience reviewing HIV/AIDS correctional protocols, and researchers with and without correctional HIV/AIDS research experience. Across all groups, respondents answered 4.5 of the items correctly. Individuals who have overseen or (...)
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  30.  21
    Atsushi Senju & Mark H. Johnson (2010). Is Eye Contact the Key to the Social Brain? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):458-459.
    Eye contact plays a critical role in many aspects of face processing, including the processing of smiles. We propose that this is achieved by a subcortical route, which is activated by eye contact and modulates the cortical areas involve in social cognition, including the processing of facial expression. This mechanism could be impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.
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  31.  33
    Mark Johnson (1991). Knowing Through the Body. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):3-18.
    Abstract Recent empirical studies of categorization, concept development, semantic structure, and reasoning reveal the inadequacies of all theories that regard knowledge as static, propositional, and sentential. These studies show that conceptual structure and reason are grounded in patterns of bodily experience. Structures of our spatial/temporal orientations, perceptual interactions, and motor programs provide an imaginative basis for our knowledge of, and reasoning about, more abstract domains. Such a view transcends both foundationalism and extreme relativism or scepticism.
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  32.  2
    Mark Johnson (2016). Pragmatism, Cognitive Science, and Embodied Mind. In Matthias Jung & Roman Madzia (eds.), Pragmatism and Embodied Cognitive Science: From Bodily Intersubjectivity to Symbolic Articulation. De Gruyter 101-126.
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  33. Mark Johnson (1985). Imagination in Moral Judgment. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (2):265-280.
  34.  6
    Mark Johnson & Stefan Riezler (2002). Statistical Models of Syntax Learning and Use. Cognitive Science 26 (3):239-253.
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  35.  12
    Rick O. Gilmore & Mark H. Johnson (1997). Body-Centered Representations for Visually-Guided Action Emerge During Early Infancy. Cognition 65 (1):B1-B9.
  36. Mark Johnson (2001). The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):323-326.
  37.  1
    Mark H. Johnson (2011). Face Perception: A Developmental Perspective. In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford 1.
    This article views face perception as the ideal case study example for understanding the deeper principles underlying human neurodevelopment. It illustrates how face perception has been one of oldest battlegrounds for resolving key issues in human development. It argues that taking a developmental approach to face perception can resolve some of the major current debates in the adult face perception and cognitive neuroscience literature. Thus, face perception and development continue to be mutually informative domains of study. The work on newborns (...)
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  38. Mark Johnson (ed.) (1981). Philosophical Perspectives on Metaphor. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
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  39.  13
    Mark E. Johnson, Christiane Brems, Aaron L. Bergman, Michael E. Mills & Gloria D. Eldridge (2015). Knowledge of Federal Regulations for Mental Health Research Involving Prisoners. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 6 (4):12-18.
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  40.  3
    Mark Johnson (2015). Embodied Understanding. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  41. Yuko Munakata, James L. McClelland, Mark H. Johnson & Robert S. Siegler (1997). Rethinking Infant Knowledge: Toward an Adaptive Process Account of Successes and Failures in Object Permanence Tasks. Psychological Review 104 (4):686-713.
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  42. John Morton & Mark H. Johnson (1991). CONSPEC and CONLERN: A Two-Process Theory of Infant Face Recognition. Psychological Review 98 (2):164-181.
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  43.  16
    Mark Johnson (2002). Cowboy Bill Rides Herd on the Range of Consciousness. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (4):256-263.
  44. Mark Johnson (2006). Cognitive Science. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub.
  45.  54
    Mark L. Johnson (1995). Incarnate Mind. Minds and Machines 5 (4):533-45.
    We are beings of the flesh. Our sensorimotor motor experience is the basis for the structure of our higher cognitive functions of conceptual cognition and reasoning. Consequently, our subjectivity is intimately tied up with the nature of our embodied experience. This runs directly counter to views of self-identity dominant in contemporary cognitive science. I give an account of how we ought to understand ourselves as incarnates, and how this would change our view of meaning, knowledge, reason, and subjectivity.
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  46.  10
    Mark Johnson (1991). Does Natural Philosophy Prove the Immaterial? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (1):97-105.
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  47.  50
    Mark Johnson (2008). What Makes a Body? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (3):pp. 159-169.
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  48.  37
    Mark L. Johnson, Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors.
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what attention is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) “cause” theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) “effect” theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition metaphor); and (c) hybrid theories that combine cause and (...)
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  49.  9
    Mark Johnson, Andy Clark, Moral Objectivity & Robert Gordon (1993). Department of Philosophy, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri FRIDAY, April 8 SATURDAY, April 9 Welcome: Roger Gibson University. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 3 (511).
  50.  42
    Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Kim Plunkett & Mark H. Johnson (1998). What Does It Mean to Claim That Something Is 'Innate'? Response to Clark, Harris, Lightfoot and Samuels. Mind and Language 13 (4):588-597.
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