8 found
Sort by:
  1. Jill Thijssen, Henry Otgaar, Mark L. Howe & Corine de Ruiter (2013). Emotional True and False Memories in Children with Callous-Unemotional Traits. Cognition and Emotion 27 (4):761-768.
  2. Mark L. Howe & Mary H. Derbish (2010). On the Susceptibility of Adaptive Memory to False Memory Illusions. Cognition 115 (2):252-267.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Mark L. Howe, Sarah R. Garner, Stephen A. Dewhurst & Linden J. Ball (2010). Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions? Cognition 117 (2):176-181.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mark L. Howe (2000). Consciousness, Memory, and Development. In , The Fate of Early Memories: Developmental Science and the Retention of Childhood Experiences. American Psychological Association. 105-118.
  5. Mark L. Howe (ed.) (2000). The Fate of Early Memories: Developmental Science and the Retention of Childhood Experiences. American Psychological Association.
  6. Julia T. O'Sullivan & Mark L. Howe (1995). Metamemory and Memory Construction. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):104-110.
    In this article, we present the contemporary conceptualization of metamemory as beliefs, accurate and naive, about memory. We discuss the implications of metamemory for memory construction in general and for suggestibility and the recovery of memories in particular. We argue that beliefs about memory influence the probability that suggestions will be incorporated into memory and judgements about the veracity of subsequent recollections. Implications for research on the role of beliefs in suggestibility and memory recovery are outlined.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mark L. Howe, Mary L. Courage & Carole Peterson (1994). How Can I Remember When "I" Wasn′T There: Long-Term Retention of Traumatic Experiences and Emergence of the Cognitive Self. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):327-355.
    In this article, we focus on two issues, namely, the nature and onset of very early personal memories, especially for traumatic events, and the role of stress in long-term retention. We begin by outlining a theory of early autobiographical memory, one whose unfolding is coincident with emergence of the cognitive self. It is argued that it is not until this self emerges that personal memories will remain viable over extended periods of time. We illustrate this with 25 cases of young (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mark L. Howe, William A. Montevecchi, F. Michael Rabsnowitz & Michael J. Stones (1991). Modeling Adaptation in the Next Generation: A Developmental Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):100-101.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation