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  1.  10
    Mark Olssen (1999). Michel Foucault: Materialism and Education. Bergin & Garvey.
    In relation to education, there is in Foucault's approach a double emphasis which constitutes an ordering principle for this work.
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  2.  65
    Mark Olssen (2005). Foucault, Educational Research and the Issue of Autonomy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):365–387.
    This article seeks to demonstrate a particular application of Foucault's philosophical approach to a particular issue in education: that of personal autonomy. The paper surveys and extends the approach taken by James Marshall in his book Michel Foucault: Personal autonomy and education. After surveying Marshall's writing on the issue I extend Marshall's approach, critically analysing the work of Rob Reich and Meira Levinson, two contemporary philosophers who advocate models of personal autonomy as the basis for a liberal education.
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  3.  18
    Mark Olssen (2006). Foucault and the Imperatives of Education: Critique and Self-Creation in a Non-Foundational World. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (3):245-271.
  4.  19
    Mark Olssen (2008). Foucault as Complexity Theorist: Overcoming the Problems of Classical Philosophical Analysis. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (1):96–117.
    This article explores the affinities and parallels between Foucault's Nietzschean view of history and models of complexity developed in the physical sciences in the twentieth century. It claims that Foucault's rejection of structuralism and Marxism can be explained as a consequence of his own approach which posits a radical ontology whereby the conception of the totality or whole is reconfigured as an always open, relatively borderless system of infinite interconnections, possibilities and developments. His rejection of Hegelianism, as well as of (...)
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  5.  7
    Mark Olssen (2001). Citizenship and Education: From Alfred Marshall to Iris Marion Young. Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (1):77–94.
    The welfare state was characterised by two central principles: universality and equality.It can be argued that the development of education in New Zealand was shaped and maintained by both these ideals.The public benefits of education were not, however, simply the sum of individual private benefits, for norms such as political or civic tolerance, literacy, or the values required for democratic functioning adhere to the quality of a community and are not reducible to, or contained in, the psychological characteristics of individuals.The (...)
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  6.  2
    Richard Watermeyer & Mark Olssen (2016). ‘Excellence’ and Exclusion: The Individual Costs of Institutional Competitiveness. Minerva 54 (2):201-218.
    A performance-based funding system like the United Kingdom’s ‘Research Excellence Framework’ symbolizes the re-rationalization of higher education according to neoliberal ideology and New Public Management technologies. The REF is also significant for disclosing the kinds of behaviour that characterize universities’ response to government demands for research auditability. In this paper, we consider the casualties of what Henry Giroux calls “neoliberalism’s war on higher education” or more precisely the deleterious consequences of non-participation in the REF. We also discuss the ways with (...)
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  7.  5
    Mark Olssen (2004). Erratum To: The School as the Microscope of Conduct: Doing Foucauldian Research in Education. In James Marshall (ed.), Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy. Kluwer Academic Publishers 1--1.
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  8.  4
    Mark Olssen (2008). John Codd Obituary. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):467-470.
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  9.  1
    Mark Olssen (2004). The School as the Microscope of Conduction: Doing Foucauldian Research in Education. In James Marshall (ed.), Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy. Kluwer Academic Publishers 57--84.
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  10. Mark Olssen (2010). Discourse, Complexity, Life : Elaborating the Possibilities of Foucault's Materialist Concept of Discourse. In Colin B. Grant (ed.), Beyond Universal Pragmatics: Studies in the Philosophy of Communication. Peter Lang
     
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  11. Mark Olssen (2010). Liberalism, Neoliberalism, Social Democracy: Thin Communitarian Perspectives on Political Philosophy and Education. Routledge.
    Introduction: Beyond neoliberalism -- Friedrich A. Hayek : markets, planning, and the rule of law -- The politics of utopia and the liberal theory of totalitarianism : Karl Popper and Michael Foucault -- Pluralism and positive freedom : toward a critique of Isaiah Berlin -- From the Crick report to the Parekh report : multiculturalism, cultural difference and democracy -- Foucault, liberal education and the issue of autonomy -- Saving Martha Nussbaum from herself : help from friends she didn't know (...)
     
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  12. Mark Olssen (1996). Radical Constructivism and its Failings: Anti‐Realism and Individualism. British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (3):275-295.
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  13.  20
    Mark Olssen (1996). Radical Constructivism and Its Failings: Anti-Realism and Individualism. British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (3):275-295.
    Radical constructivism has had a major influence on present-day education, especially in the teaching of science and mathematics. The article provides an epistemological profile of constructivism and considers its strengths and weaknesses from the standpoint of its educational implications. It is argued that there are two central problems with constructivism: anti- realism and individualism which, in turn, lead to difficulties associated with idealism and relativism which, together, prove fatal for the theory.
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