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  1. Mark P. Aulisio & Kavita Shah Arora (2014). Speak No Evil? Conscience and the Duty to Inform, Refer or Transfer Care. HEC Forum 26 (3):257-266.
    This paper argues that the type of conscience claims made in last decade’s spate of cases involving pharmacists’ objections to filling birth control prescriptions and cases such as Ms. Means and Mercy Health Partners of Michigan, and even the Affordable Care Act and the Little Sisters of the Poor, as different as they appear to be from each other, share a common element that ties them together and makes them fundamentally different in kind from traditional claims of conscience about which (...)
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  2. Mark P. Aulisio, Jessica Moore, May Blanchard, Marcia Bailey & Dawn Smith (2009). Clinical Ethics Consultation and Ethics Integration in an Urban Public Hospital. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (04):371-.
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  3. Thomas May & Mark P. Aulisio (2008). Personal Morality and Professional Obligations: Rights of Conscience and Informed Consent. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (1):30-38.
  4. Noriko Nagao, Mark P. Aulisio, Yoshio Nukaga, Misao Fujita, Shinji Kosugi, Stuart Youngner & Akira Akabayashi (2008). Clinical Ethics Consultation: Examining How American and Japanese Experts Analyze an Alzheimeras Case. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):2-.
    BackgroundFew comparative studies of clinical ethics consultation practices have been reported. The objective of this study was to explore how American and Japanese experts analyze an Alzheimer's case regarding ethics consultation.MethodsWe presented the case to physicians and ethicists from the US and Japan (one expert from each field from both countries; total = 4) and obtained their responses through a questionnaire and in-depth interviews.ResultsEstablishing a consensus was a common goal among American and Japanese participants. In attempting to achieve consensus, the (...)
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  5. Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (eds.) (2003). Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In the clinical setting, questions of medical ethics raise a host of perplexing problems, often complicated by conflicting perspectives and the need to make immediate decisions. In this volume, bioethicists and physicians provide a nuanced, in-depth approach to the difficult issues involved in bioethics consultation. Addressing the needs of researchers, clinicians, and other health professionals on the front lines of bioethics practice, the contributors focus primarily on practical concerns -- whether ethics consultation is best done by individuals, teams, or committees (...)
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  6. Thomas May, Mark P. Aulisio & Ross D. Silverman (2003). The Smallpox Vaccination of Health Care Workers: Professional Obligations and Defense Against Bioterrorism. Hastings Center Report 33 (5):26-33.
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  7. Mark P. Aulisio & L. S. Rothenberg (2002). Bioethics, Medical Humanities, and the Future of the "Field": Reflections on the Results of the ASBH Survey of North American Graduate Bioethics/Medical Humanities Training Programs. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):3 – 9.
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  8. Mark P. Aulisio (2001). Doing Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):54-55.
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  9. Mark P. Aulisio, Thomas May & Geoffrey D. Block (2001). Procreation for Donation: The Moral and Political Permissibility of “Having a Child to Save a Child”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):408-419.
    The crisis in donor organ and tissue supply is one of the most difficult challenges for transplant today. New policy initiatives, such as the driver's license option and requiredrequest, have been implemented in many states, with other initiatives, such as mandatedchoice and presumedconsent, proposed in the hopes of ameliorating this crisis. At the same time, traditional acquisition of organs from human cadavers has been augmented by living human donors, and nonheartbeating human donors, as well as experimental animal and artificial sources. (...)
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  10. Michael A. DeVita & Mark P. Aulisio (2001). The Ethics of Medical Mistakes: Historical, Legal, and Institutional Perspectives. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):115-116.
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  11. Michael Devita, Mark P. Aulisio & Thomas May (2001). Transplantation Ethics: Old Questions, New Answers? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):357-360.
    The first reported successful kidney transplantation occurred in 1954, between twins. Since then, organ donation and transplantation has become less a medical marvel than a common expectation of patients with a variety of diseases resulting in organ failure. Those expectations have caused demand for organs to skyrocket far beyond available supply, fueling an organ shortage and resulting in over 60,000 patients on transplant waiting lists. In this special issue, our contributors attempt to shed new light on some of the many (...)
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  12. Thomas May & Mark P. Aulisio (2001). Medical Malpractice, Mistake Prevention, and Compensation. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):135-146.
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  13. Mark P. Aulisio (1999). Ethics Consultation: Is It Enough to Mean Well? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 11 (3):208-217.
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  14. Mark P. Aulisio & Robert M. Arnold (1999). Commentary: A Consensus About "Consensus"? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (4):328-331.
  15. Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (1999). An Ongoing Conversation: The Task Force Report and Bioethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (1):3.
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  16. Mark P. Aulisio (1998). The Foundations of Bioethics: Contingency and Relevance. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (4):428 – 438.
    In this essay, I proceed by, first, laying out H. Tristram Engelhardt's argument for the principle of permission as the proper foundation for a secular bioethic. After considering how a number of commentators have tried to undermine this argument, I show why it is immune to some of these advances. I then offer my own critique of Engelhardt's project. This critique is two pronged. First, I argue that Engelhardt is unable to establish his own foundation for a secular bioethic. This (...)
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  17. Mark P. Aulisio (1996). On the Importance of the Intention/Foresight Distinction. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (2):189-205.
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  18. Mark P. Aulisio (1995). In Defense of the Intention/Foresight Distinction. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (4):341 - 354.
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