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  1. Mark R. Wicclair (forthcoming). Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions. HEC Forum:1-17.
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
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  2. Mark R. Wicclair (2013). Conscience. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  3. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Three approaches to conscientious objection in health care: conscience absolutism, the incompatibility thesis, and compromise; 3. Ethical limitations on the exercise of conscience; 4. Pharmacies, health care institutions, and conscientious objection; 5. Students, residents, and conscience-based exemptions; 6. Conscience clauses: too little and too much protection; References.
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  4. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Conscientious Refusals by Hospitals and Emergency Contraception. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):130-138.
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  5. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Commentary: Rights, Professional Obligations, and Moral Disapproval. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):144-147.
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  6. Mark R. Wicclair (2009). Conscience-Based Exemptions for Medical Students. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):38-.
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  7. Mark R. Wicclair (2008). Negative and Positive Claims of Conscience. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (01):14-.
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  8. Mark R. Wicclair (2008). Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician's Professional Obligations? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), internal morality (...)
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  9. Mark R. Wicclair (2008). The Pedagogical Value of House, M.D. —Can a Fictional Unethical Physician Be Used to Teach Ethics? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):16 – 17.
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  10. Mark R. Wicclair (2007). Ethics and Research with Deceased Patients. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (01):87-97.
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  11. Mark R. Wicclair (2007). Professionalism, Religion and Shared Decision-Making. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):29 – 31.
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  12. Mark R. Wicclair (2007). Reasons and Healthcare Professionals' Claims of Conscience. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):21 – 22.
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  13. Mark R. Wicclair (2007). The Moral Significance of Claims of Conscience in Healthcare. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):30 – 31.
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  14. Mark R. Wicclair (2006). Pharmacies, Pharmacists, and Conscientious Objection. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (3):225-250.
    : This paper examines the obligations of pharmacy licensees and pharmacists in the context of conscience-based objections to filling lawful prescriptions for certain types of medications—e.g., standard and emergency contraceptives. Claims of conscience are analyzed as means to preserve or maintain an individual's moral integrity. It is argued that pharmacy licensees have an obligation to dispense prescription medications that satisfy the health needs of the populations they serve, and this obligation can override claims of conscience. Although efforts should be made (...)
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  15. David Barnard, Celia Berdes, James L. Bernat, Linda Emanuel, Robert Fogerty, Linda Ganzini, Elizabeth R. Goy, David J. Mayo, John Paris, Michael D. Schreiber, J. David Velleman & Mark R. Wicclair (2005). Death in the Clinic. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  16. Mark R. Wicclair & Michael DeVita (2004). Oversight of Research Involving the Dead. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (2):143-164.
    : Research involving the dead, especially heart-beating cadavers, may facilitate the testing of potentially revolutionary and life-saving medical treatments. However, to ensure that such research is conducted ethically, it is essential to: (1) identify appropriate standards for this research and (2) assign institutional responsibility and a mechanism for oversight. Protocols for research involving the dead should be reviewed by a special committee and assessed according to nine standards intended to ensure scientific merit, to protect deceased patients and their families, and (...)
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  17. Mark R. Wicclair (2002). Informed Consent and Research Involving the Newly Dead. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):351-372.
    : This paper examines informed consent in relation to research involving the newly dead. Reasons are presented for facilitating advance decision making in relation to postmortem research, and it is argued that the informed consent of family members should be sought when the deceased have not made a premortem decision. Regardless of whether the dead can be harmed, there are two important respects in which family consent can serve to protect the dead: (1) protecting the deceased's body from being used (...)
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  18. Mark R. Wicclair (2000). Conscientious Objection in Medicine. Bioethics 14 (3):205–227.
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  19. Mark R. Wicclair (1999). Ethics, Community and the Elderly. In Michael Parker (ed.), Ethics and Community in the Health Care Professions. Routledge. 135.
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  20. Mark R. Wicclair (1999). The Continuing Debate Over Risk-Related Standards of Competence. Bioethics 13 (2):149–153.
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  21. Rosa Lynn Pinkus, Gretchen M. Aumann, Mark G. Kuczewski, Anne Medsger, Alan Meisel, Lisa S. Parker & Mark R. Wicclair (1995). The Consortium Ethics Program: An Approach to Establishing a Permanent Regional Ethics Network. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 7 (1):13-32.
    This paper describes the first three-year experience of the Consortium Ethics Program (CEP-1) of the University of Pittsburgh Center for Medical Ethics, and also outlines plans for the second three-year phase (CEP-2) of this experiment in continuing ethics education. In existence since 1990, the CEP has the primary goal of creating a cost-effective, permanent ethics resource network, by utilizing the educational resources of a university bioethics center and the practical expertise of a regional hospital council. The CEP's conception and specific (...)
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  22. Mark R. Wicclair (1991). A Response to Brock and SKENE. Bioethics 5 (2):118–122.
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  23. Mark R. Wicclair (1991). Patient Decision-Making Capacity and Risk. Bioethics 5 (2):91–104.
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  24. Mark R. Wicclair (1990). Caring for Frail Elderly Parents. Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):163-189.
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  25. Mark R. Wicclair (1985). A Shield Privilege for Reporters V. The Administration of Justice and the Right to a Fair Trial. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2):1-14.
  26. Mark R. Wicclair & Richard P. Cunningham (1985). A Shield Privilege for Reporters V. The Administration of Justice and the Right to a Fair Trial: Is There a Conflict? [With Commentary]. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2):1 - 17.
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  27. Mark R. Wicclair (1981). The Abortion Controversy and the Claim That This Body Is Mine. Social Theory and Practice 7 (3):337-346.
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