Search results for 'Mark S. George' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Ziad Nahas, Jeffrey P. Lorberbaum, Frank A. Kozel & Mark S. George (2004). Somatic Treatments in Psychiatry. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss
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  2.  18
    Kevin A. Johnson, F. Andrew Kozel, Steven J. Laken & Mark S. George (2007). The Neuroscience of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fmri for Deception Detection. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):58 – 60.
  3.  3
    George Vass, S. J. Andwilliam Mathews & J. S. (1972). Lonergan's Method: Two Views. Heythrop Journal 13 (4):415–435.
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  4.  3
    Joseph Sartorelli (1994). Mary Bittner Wiseman, Gary Shapiro, Michael L. Hall, Walter L. Reed, John J. Stuhr, George Poe, Bruce Krajewski, Walter Broman, Christopher McClintick, Jerome Schwartz, Roberta Davidson, Christopher Clausen, Michael Calabrese, Guy Willoughby, Don H. Bialostosky, Thomas R. Hart, Tom Conley, Michael McGaha, W. Wolfgang Holdheim, Mark Stocker, Sandra Sherman, Michael J. Weber, Sylvia Walsh, Mary Anne O'Neil, Robert Tobin, Donald M. Brown, Susan B. Brill, Oona Ajzenstat, Jeff Mitchell, Michael McClintick, Louis MacKenzie, Peter Losin, C. S. Schreiner, Walter A. Strauss, Eric J. Ziolkowski, William J. Berg, and Patrick Henry. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):354.
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  5.  11
    D. C. C. Young (1966). George Herbert's Latin Poetry Mark McCloskey and Paul R. Murphy: The Latin Poetry of George Herbert. A Bilingual Edition. Pp. Ix+181. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1965. Cloth, $5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (03):400-402.
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  6. Luis A. Fernandez (2012). Mark Neocleous and George S. Rigakos, Eds, Anti-Security. Radical Philosophy 175:63.
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  7. Itamar Pitowsky (1994). George Boole's 'Conditions of Possible Experience' and the Quantum Puzzle. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):95-125.
    In the mid-nineteenth century George Boole formulated his ‘conditions of possible experience’. These are equations and ineqaulities that the relative frequencies of events must satisfy. Some of Boole's conditions have been rediscovered in more recent years by physicists, including Bell inequalities, Clauser Horne inequalities, and many others. In this paper, the nature of Boole's conditions and their relation to propositional logic is explained, and the puzzle associated with their violation by quantum frequencies is investigated in relation to a variety (...)
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  8.  9
    Robert Thomas (2002). Idea Analysis of Algebraic Groups: A Critical Comment on George Lakoff and Rafael Núñez's Where Mathematics Comes From. Philosophical Psychology 15 (2):185 – 195.
    The study that George Lakoff and Rafael Núñez call "idea analysis" and begin in their recent book Where mathematics comes from is intended to dissect mathematical concepts into their metaphorical parts, where metaphor is used in the cognitive-science sense promoted by Lakoff and Mark Johnson in Metaphors we live by and subsequent works by each of them and together. Lakoff and Núñez's analysis of the (modern) algebraic concept of group is based on the attribution to contemporary mathematics of (...)
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  9.  9
    George W. Harris (1990). Book Review:Integrity: A Philosophical Inquiry. Mark S. Halfon. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (1):188-.
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  10.  73
    Paul Griffiths (2003). Beyond the Baldwin Effect: James Mark Baldwin's 'Social Heredity', Epigenetic Inheritance, and Niche Construction. In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press 193--215.
    I argue that too much attention has been paid to the Baldwin effect. George Gaylord Simpson was probably right when he said that the effect is theoretically possible and may have actually occurred but that this has no major implications for evolutionary theory. The Baldwin effect is not even central to Baldwin's own account of social heredity and biology-culture co-evolution, an account that in important respects resembles the modern ideas of epigenetic inheritance and niche-construction.
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  11.  16
    Mark Berry (2002). Music, Postmodernism, and George Rochberg's Third String Quartet. In Judith Irene Lochhead & Joseph Henry Auner (eds.), Postmodern Music/Postmodern Thought. Routledge 235--248.
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  12.  4
    Johann S. Ach, Susanne Ackerman, F. Terrence, Allan Adelman & Howard See Adelman (2003). Agich, George J., and Bethan J. Spielman. Ethics Expert Testimony: Against the Skeptics 22, 381. Agich, George J., and Royce P. Jones. The Logical Status of Brain Death Criteria 10, 387. Allison, David, and Mark D. Roberts. On Constructing the Disorder of Hysteria 19, 239. Anderson, W. French. Human Gene Therapy: Scientific and Ethical Considerations 10, 275. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 360:5310.
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  13. Ann S. Ferebee (1972). Aiserman Marc A., Gusev Leonid A., Rozonoer Lev I., Smirnova Irina M., and Tal Aleksey A.. Logic, Automata, and Algorithms. Revised English Translation of XXXI 109 by Scripta Technica, Inc., Kranc George M., Translation Editor. Academic Press, New York and London 1971, Xii + 433 Pp.Aiserman Mark Aronowitsch, Gussew L. A., Rosonoer L. I., Smirnova I. M., and Tal A. A.. Logik—Automaten—Algorithmen. Revised German Translation of the Same by Rudolf Herschel. R. Oldenbourg Verlag, Munich and Vienna 1967, X + 431 Pp.Ajzerman M. A., Gusev L. A., Rozonoer L. I., Smirnova I. M., and Tal A. A.. Logika, Automaty a Algoritmy. Czech Translation of the Same by Jaroslav Volčik, Miroslav Mleziva, and Antonín Mykiska. Československá Akademie Věd, Prague 1971, 407 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (3):625.
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  14. Mark Francis (2009). David Stack, Queen Victoria's Skull: George Combe and the Mid-Victorian Mind. London: Hambledon Continuum, 2008. Pp. Xviii+350. ISBN 978 1 84725 233 3. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 42 (4):620.
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  15. S. P. Verma (2001). The New Cambridge History of India: Architecture and Art of the Deccan Sultanates By George Michell and Mark Zebrowski. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. Xxxiii, 299. Price HB 55.00. 0521-56321-6. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 12 (2):232-232.
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  16.  1
    Mark S. Mcleod (1988). Can Belief in God Be Confirmed?: MARK S. MCLEOD. Religious Studies 24 (3):311-323.
    A basic thrust behind Alvin Plantinga's position that belief in God is properly basic is an analogy between certain non-religious beliefs such as ‘I see a tree’ and theistic beliefs such as ‘God made this flower’. Each kind of belief is justified for a believer, argues Plantinga, when she finds herself in a certain set of conditions. Richard Grigg challenges this claim by arguing that while the non-religious beliefs are confirmed, beliefs about God are not. I wish to explore this (...)
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  17.  1
    Cameron Ellis (2016). Barack Obama and the Rhetoric of Hope by Mark S. Ferrara. Utopian Studies 27 (2):382-386.
    Mark S. Ferrara’s principle scholarly interests lie within the fields of religious studies and Asian philosophy, as indicated on his State University of New York–Oneonta English faculty page and demonstrated in his other books Between Noble and Humble: Cao Xueqin and the Dream of the Red Chamber and Palace of Ashes: China and the Decline of American Higher Education. However, it is his interests in rhetoric and political discourse, cultural studies, and world literature that make Barack Obama and the (...)
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  18.  53
    D. Efird (2011). Make/Believing the World(S): Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism * By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison. Analysis 71 (2):404-406.
    ‘We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth’, so Christians confess when they recite the Nicene Creed. Now if the argument of Mark S. McLeod-Harrison’s Make/Believing the World: Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism is correct, God is not alone in that task. We human beings are makers of heaven and earth, too, in the sense that what exists is as it is because our minds have made it so, which is a kind of (...)
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  19.  6
    Charles B. Cousar (1970). Eschatology and Mark's Theologia Crucis A Critical Analysis of Mark 13. Interpretation 24 (3):321-335.
    Mark's whole understanding of the gospel, what it does for believers, and what believers must do in response, points to an eschatology understood in mission, not in withdrawal. The Son of Man who is to come recognizes as his own those who through proclamation and suffering have identified with his redemptive activity in the world. No moment is incidental, because in view of the cross and resurrection the history and life of the people of God have become throughly eschatological.
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  20.  2
    Jack Dean Kingsbury (1981). The “Divine Man” as the Key to Mark's Christology—The End of an Era? Interpretation 35 (3):243-257.
    The clue to the Christology of Mark's Gospel is found in the story itself, not in the tradition Mark used nor in the community for which he wrote.
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  21. Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta (1999). Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics. Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.
    Mark Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does not (...)
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  22.  16
    Hugh Hunter (2015). George Berkeley’s Proof for the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):183-193.
    Most philosophers have given up George Berkeley’s proof for the existence of God as a lost cause, for in it, Berkeley seems to conclude more than he actually shows. I defend the proof by showing that its conclusion is not the thesis that an infinite and perfect God exists, but rather the much weaker thesis that a very powerful God exists and that this God’s agency is pervasive in nature. This interpretation, I argue, is consistent with the texts. It (...)
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  23.  46
    James Tartaglia (2008). Intentionality, Consciousness, and the Mark of the Mental: Rorty’s Challenge. The Monist 91 (2):324-346.
    Intentionality and phenomenal consciousness are the main candidates to provide a ‘ mark of the mental’. Rorty, who thinks the category ‘mental’ lacks any underlying unity, suggests a challenge to these positions: to explain how intentionality or phenomenal consciousness alone could generate a mental-physical contrast. I argue that a failure to meet Rorty’s challenge would present a serious indictment of the concept of mind, even though Rorty’s own position is untenable. I then argue that both intentionalism and proposals such (...)
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  24.  66
    Gabor Pallo (2011). Early Impact of Quantum Physics on Chemistry: George Hevesy's Work on Rare Earth Elements and Michael Polanyi's Absorption Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):51-61.
    After Heitler and London published their pioneering work on the application of quantum mechanics to chemistry in 1927, it became an almost unquestioned dogma that chemistry would soon disappear as a discipline of its own rights. Reductionism felt victorious in the hope of analytically describing the chemical bond and the structure of molecules. The old quantum theory has already produced a widely applied model for the structure of atoms and the explanation of the periodic system. This paper will show two (...)
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  25.  35
    Sharon Ford (2012). Objects, Discreteness, and Pure Power Theories: George Molnar’s Critique of Sydney Shoemaker’s Causal Theory of Properties. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 13 (2):195-215.
    Sydney Shoemaker’s causal theory of properties is an important starting place for some contemporary metaphysical perspectives concerning the nature of properties. In this paper, I discuss the causal and intrinsic criteria that Shoemaker stipulates for the identity of genuine properties and relations, and address George Molnar’s criticism that holding both criteria presents an unbridgeable hypothesis in the causal theory of properties. The causal criterion requires that properties and relations contribute to the causal powers of objects if they are to (...)
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  26.  3
    Joshua Daniel (2016). H. Richard Niebuhr's Reading of George Herbert Mead: Correcting, Completing, and Looking Ahead. Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (1):92-115.
    In this essay, I reconstruct H. Richard Niebuhr's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's account of the social constitution of the self. Specifically, I correct Niebuhr's interpretation, because it mischaracterizes Mead's understanding of social constitution as more dialogical than ecological. I also argue that Niebuhr's interpretation needs completing because it fails to engage one of Mead's more significant notions, the I/me distinction within the self. By reconstructing Niebuhr's account of faith and responsibility as theologically self-constitutive through Mead's I/me distinction, I (...)
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  27.  3
    Robert J. Yanal (ed.) (1993). Institutions of Art: Reconsiderations of George Dickie's Philosophy. Penn State University Press.
    George Dickie has been one of the most innovative, influential, and controversial philosophers of art working in the analytical tradition in the past twenty-five years. Dickie's arguments against the various theories of aesthetic attitude, aesthetic perception, and aesthetic experience virtually brought classical theories of the aesthetic to a halt. His institutional theory of art was perhaps the most discussed proposal in aesthetics during the 1970s and 1980s, inspiring both supporters who produced variations on the theory as well as passionate (...)
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  28. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were (...)
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  29. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Concept of Mind: Underlying Nature, Reference-Fixing, and the Mark of the Mental. In Sandra Lapointe & Christopher Pincock (eds.), Innovations in the History of Analytical Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan
    Perhaps the philosophical thesis most commonly associated with Brentano is that intentionality is the mark of the mental. But in fact Brentano often and centrally uses also what he calls ‘inner perception’ to demarcate the mental. In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Brentano’s conception of the interrelations between mentality, intentionality, and inner perception. According to this interpretation, Brentano took the concept of mind to be a natural-kind concept, with intentionality constituting the underlying nature of the mental (...)
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  30. Mark F. Sharlow, The Unfinishable Scroll and Beyond: Mark Sharlow's Blogs, July 2008 to March 2011.
    An archive of Mark Sharlow's two blogs, "The Unfinishable Scroll" and "Religion: the Next Version." Covers Sharlow's views on metaphysics, epistemology, mind, science, religion, and politics. Includes topics and ideas not found in his papers.
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  31.  19
    Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell (2007). A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell's Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  32.  1
    M. J. S. Rudwick (1962). Hutton and Werner Compared: George Greenough's Geological Tour of Scotland in 1805. British Journal for the History of Science 1 (2):117-135.
    George Greenough was one of the influential group of early nineteenth-century English geologists who rejected both Hutton's and Werner's attempts to propound all-embracing geological theories, and followed a deliberately empirical approach. He travelled through Scotland in 1805, studying geological phenomena in the light of both the Plutonist and the Neptunist theories, and generally concluded that neither was entirely satisfactory as an explanation of the observable facts. He was also the first to suggest that the ‘Parallel Roads’ of Glen Roy (...)
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  33.  1
    William Loader (2016). What Light Does Matthew's Use of Mark in Matthew 1-4 Throw on Matthew's Theological Location? Hts Theological Studies 72 (4):1-11.
    This article approaches the issue of Matthew's theological context by examining Matthew's use of Mark, including through redaction and supplementation, in Matthew 1-4. This is undertaken in two parts: Matthew 1-2, which is largely additional material, and Matthew 3-4, followed by a concluding assessment. Issues addressed or alluded to in these chapters frequently find resonance in the remainder of Matthew's gospel and so give important clues about Matthew's concerns and their relevance for understanding its context. Such issues include the (...)
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  34. Tristram McPherson (2012). Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: Agent-Neutrality, Moral Epistemology, and Methodology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):445-453.
    Symposium contribution on Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. Argues that Schroeder's account of agent-neutral reasons cannot be made to work, that the limited scope of his distinctive proposal in the epistemology of reasons undermines its plausibility, and that Schroeder faces an uncomfortable tension between the initial motivation for his view and the details of the view he develops.
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  35. Jonathan Dancy (2012). Response to Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):455-462.
    Response to Mark Schroeder’s Slaves of the passions Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9656-3 Authors Jonathan Dancy, The University of Reading, Reading, UK Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  36. Richard L. Rohrbaugh (forthcoming). Book Review: The Quest for Home: Household in Mark's Community. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (2):216-218.
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  37.  5
    Norman R. Petersen (1980). When is the End Not the End? Literary Reflections on the Ending of Mark's Narrative. Interpretation 34 (2):151-166.
    “…we are left with a choice between saying that Mark was simply incompetent, or that the ending, though strange, is right if rightly (finely) interpreted. We have to explain why a book that begins so triumphantly and makes promises of a certain kind ends in silence and dismay, without fulfilling the promises.”1 (Frank Kermode.).
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  38.  4
    Howard Clark Kee (1978). Mark's Gospel in Recent Research. Interpretation 32 (4):353-368.
    The history of recent research on the Gospel of Mark can be seen as the record of an attempt to discern the aim of the Evangelist and so to discover the perspective which gives coherence to all the features of the Second Gospel.
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  39. S. R. Smith (2007). Mark S. Stein, Distributive Justice and Disability: Utilitarianism Against Egalitarianism. Philosophy in Review 27 (1):74.
     
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  40.  94
    David Enoch (2011). On Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: A Critical Notice of Slaves of the Passions. Philosophical Review 120 (3):423-446.
    In Slaves of the Passions Mark Schroeder puts forward Hypotheticalism, his version of a Humean theory of normative reasons that is capable, so he argues, to avoid many of the difficulties Humeanism is traditionally vulnerable to. In this critical notice, I first outline the main argument of the book, and then proceed to highlight some difficulties and challenges. I argue that these challenges show that Schroeder's improvements on traditional Humeanism – while they do succeed in making the view more (...)
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  41. Duncan McFarland (1999). Mark Johnston's Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C's application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston's "missing-explanation argument" employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are (...)
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  42. Angela M. Smith (2008). Character, Blameworthiness, and Blame: Comments on George Sher's in Praise of Blame. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 137 (1):31 - 39.
    In his recent book, In Praise of Blame, George Sher argues (among other things) that a bad act can reflect negatively on a person if that act results in an appropriate way from that person's "character," and defends a novel "two-tiered" account of what it is to blame someone. In these brief comments, I raise some questions and doubts about each of these aspects of his rich and thought-provoking account.
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  43.  23
    Danny Frederick (2014). Review Essay: Mark D. Friedman, 'Nozick’s Libertarian Project: An Elaboration and Defense'. [REVIEW] Reason Papers 36 (1):132-42.
    Review of Mark Friedman's book 'Nozick’s Libertarian Project,' which is a defence of Robert Nozick's 'Anarchy, State, and Utopia.'.
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  44.  48
    Sharon R. Ford (2012). Objects, Discreteness, and Pure Power Theories: George Molnar’s Critique of Sydney Shoemaker’s Causal Theory of Properties. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 13 (2):195-215.
    Sydney Shoemaker’s causal theory of properties is an important starting place for some contemporary metaphysical perspectives concerning the nature of properties. In this paper, I discuss the causal and intrinsic criteria that Shoemaker stipulates for the identity of genuine properties and relations, and address George Molnar’s criticism that holding both criteria presents an unbridgeable hypothesis in the causal theory of properties. The causal criterion requires that properties and relations contribute to the causal powers of objects if they are to (...)
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  45.  22
    P. Ene (2013). Descriptions as Distinctions. George Spencer Brown's Calculus of Indications as a Basis for Mitterer's Non-Dualistic Descriptions. Constructivist Foundations 8 (2):202-208.
    Context: Non-dualistic thinking is an alternative to realism and constructivism. Problem: In the absence of a distinct definition of the term “description,” the question comes up of what exactly can be included in non-dualistic descriptions, and in how far the definition of this term affects the relation between theory and empirical practice. Furthermore, this paper is concerned with the question of whether non-dualism and dualism differ in their implications. Method: I provide a wider semantic framework for the term “description” by (...)
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  46.  14
    Bertil Belfrage (2010). A Paradigm Shift in George Berkeley's Philosophy 1707-1709. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):71 - 82.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a paradigm shift in George Berkeley's philosophy between his early, unpublished manuscripts (1707-1708) and the Theory of Vision (1709). If so, the traditional method of mixing published and unpublished material will lead to a confused picture of both his early, unpublished view and the doctrine that he published. Cet article montre qu'il y a eu un changement de paradigme dans la philosophie de Berkeley entre ses premiers manuscrits, non publiés, de 1707-1708 (...)
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  47.  10
    D. Cecchetto (2011). Deconstructing Affect: Posthumanism and Mark Hansen's Media Theory. Theory, Culture and Society 28 (5):3-33.
    In the context of the highly contested discourse of posthumanism, this essay examines Mark Hansen’s attempt to give a robust account of technology in its extra-linguistic dimension by evincing an ‘‘‘originary’’ coupling of the human and the technical’ that grounds experience as such . Specifically, I argue that Hansen’s perspective is haunted by the representational logic that it moves against. In this, I do not repudiate Hansen’s argument as such, but rather reject one of its central underlying implications: that (...)
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  48.  15
    Richard M. Rubin (2014). Edward W. Lovely: George Santayana's Philosophy of Religion: His Roman Catholic Influences and Phenomenology. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):249-253.
    Religious discourse can be harsh and disconnected. In our time, determined atheists strive to refute fundamentalist beliefs promoted by demagogues for political purposes. In the news, we hear about the spiritual needs of the secular. Practicing clergy no longer believe what their congregations want them to preach. Edward W. Lovely’s new book George Santayana’s Philosophy of Religion is therefore a timely publication, as it focuses on a philosopher who showed great appreciation of religious stories and ideas, even though, as (...)
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  49.  11
    Uskali Mäki (2013). Mark Blaug's Unrealistic Crusade for Realistic Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):87-103.
    Mark Blaug’s normative methodology of economics is an attempt to articulate certain intuitions about how economic science could be improved by making it more “realistic”. I discuss two such articulations, one in terms of falsificationist principles, the other in terms of an alleged trade-off between relevance and mathematical rigour. My conclusion is that Blaug’s methodology is itself unrealistic, both descriptively and normatively. His (well intended) methodological prescriptions for the improvement of economics are not based on a systematic, consistent, descriptively (...)
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  50.  11
    Nathaniel Williams (2013). George Lippard's Fragile Utopian Future and 1840s American Economic Turmoil. Utopian Studies 24 (2):166-183.
    George Lippard’s 1845 best-selling novel, The Quaker City; or, The Monks of Monk Hall, provides insight into utopian longing in the United States during an era of uncertainty following a major economic crisis. Published in the wake of a banking panic, it portrays class hostilities stemming from notions that the poor were bearing the brunt of economic hardships caused by bad decisions on the part of wealthy investors. Lippard was a serial novelist and social activist who ultimately used his (...)
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