Search results for 'Mark S. Madsen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Vic Norris, Mark S. Madsen & Primrose Freestone (1996). Elements of a Unifying Theory of Biology. Acta Biotheoretica 44 (3-4):209-218.
    To discover a unifying theory of biology, it is necessary first to believe in its existence and second to seek its elements. Such a theory would explain the regulation of the cell cycle, differentiation and the origin of life. Some elements of the theory may be obtained by considering both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell cycles. These elements include cytoskeletal proteins, calcium, cyclins, protein kinase C, phosphorylation, transcriptional sensing, autocatalytic gene expression and the physical properties of lipids. Other more exotic candidate (...)
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  2.  1
    Mark S. Madsen (1990). Uncertainty About Quantum Mechanics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):674-675.
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  3.  3
    May Britt Postholm & Janne Madsen (2006). The Researcher's Role: An Ethical Dimension. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (1):49-60.
    Different paradigms or perspectives function as the point of departure and framework for research. In this article ethical issues in the positivist and constructivist paradigms are presented. The article points out that more or less the same ethical codes are used in these paradigms, but with some nuanced interpretations. CHAT (cultural historical activity theory) is presented as a third paradigm. While conducting research, one intention within this paradigm is to change and improve practice. This means that the researcher and the (...)
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  4.  11
    Thomas Carson Mark (1975). A Unique Copy of Spinoza's Nagelate Schriften. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):81-83.
  5.  18
    Thomas Carson Mark (1979). Spinoza's Concept of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (4):401-416.
  6.  7
    Thomas Carson Mark (1972). Spinoza's Theory of Truth. New York,Columbia University Press.
  7.  18
    Thomas Carson Mark (1975). "Ordine Geometrica Demonstrata": Spinoza's Use of the Axiomatic Method. Review of Metaphysics 29 (2):263 - 286.
  8.  10
    Thomas Carson Mark (1975). A Unique Copy of Spinoza's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1).
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  9.  1
    Robert Butterworth & J. S. (1972). The Composition of Mark 1–12. Heythrop Journal 13 (1):5–26.
  10. Mark S. Mcleod (1988). Can Belief in God Be Confirmed?: MARK S. MCLEOD. Religious Studies 24 (3):311-323.
    A basic thrust behind Alvin Plantinga's position that belief in God is properly basic is an analogy between certain non-religious beliefs such as ‘I see a tree’ and theistic beliefs such as ‘God made this flower’. Each kind of belief is justified for a believer, argues Plantinga, when she finds herself in a certain set of conditions. Richard Grigg challenges this claim by arguing that while the non-religious beliefs are confirmed, beliefs about God are not. I wish to explore this (...)
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  11.  52
    D. Efird (2011). Make/Believing the World(S): Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism * By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison. Analysis 71 (2):404-406.
    ‘We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth’, so Christians confess when they recite the Nicene Creed. Now if the argument of Mark S. McLeod-Harrison’s Make/Believing the World: Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism is correct, God is not alone in that task. We human beings are makers of heaven and earth, too, in the sense that what exists is as it is because our minds have made it so, which is a kind of (...)
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  12.  6
    Charles B. Cousar (1970). Eschatology and Mark's Theologia Crucis A Critical Analysis of Mark 13. Interpretation 24 (3):321-335.
    Mark's whole understanding of the gospel, what it does for believers, and what believers must do in response, points to an eschatology understood in mission, not in withdrawal. The Son of Man who is to come recognizes as his own those who through proclamation and suffering have identified with his redemptive activity in the world. No moment is incidental, because in view of the cross and resurrection the history and life of the people of God have become throughly eschatological.
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  13.  2
    Jack Dean Kingsbury (1981). The “Divine Man” as the Key to Mark's Christology—The End of an Era? Interpretation 35 (3):243-257.
    The clue to the Christology of Mark's Gospel is found in the story itself, not in the tradition Mark used nor in the community for which he wrote.
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  14. Cameron Ellis (2016). Barack Obama and the Rhetoric of Hope by Mark S. Ferrara. Utopian Studies 27 (2):382-386.
    Mark S. Ferrara’s principle scholarly interests lie within the fields of religious studies and Asian philosophy, as indicated on his State University of New York–Oneonta English faculty page and demonstrated in his other books Between Noble and Humble: Cao Xueqin and the Dream of the Red Chamber and Palace of Ashes: China and the Decline of American Higher Education. However, it is his interests in rhetoric and political discourse, cultural studies, and world literature that make Barack Obama and the (...)
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  15. Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta (1999). Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics. Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.
    Mark Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does not (...)
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  16.  45
    James Tartaglia (2008). Intentionality, Consciousness, and the Mark of the Mental: Rorty’s Challenge. The Monist 91 (2):324-346.
    Intentionality and phenomenal consciousness are the main candidates to provide a ‘ mark of the mental’. Rorty, who thinks the category ‘mental’ lacks any underlying unity, suggests a challenge to these positions: to explain how intentionality or phenomenal consciousness alone could generate a mental-physical contrast. I argue that a failure to meet Rorty’s challenge would present a serious indictment of the concept of mind, even though Rorty’s own position is untenable. I then argue that both intentionalism and proposals such (...)
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  17. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were (...)
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  18. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Concept of Mind: Underlying Nature, Reference-Fixing, and the Mark of the Mental. In Sandra Lapointe & Christopher Pincock (eds.), Innovations in the History of Analytical Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan
    Perhaps the philosophical thesis most commonly associated with Brentano is that intentionality is the mark of the mental. But in fact Brentano often and centrally uses also what he calls ‘inner perception’ to demarcate the mental. In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Brentano’s conception of the interrelations between mentality, intentionality, and inner perception. According to this interpretation, Brentano took the concept of mind to be a natural-kind concept, with intentionality constituting the underlying nature of the mental (...)
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  19. Mark F. Sharlow, The Unfinishable Scroll and Beyond: Mark Sharlow's Blogs, July 2008 to March 2011.
    An archive of Mark Sharlow's two blogs, "The Unfinishable Scroll" and "Religion: the Next Version." Covers Sharlow's views on metaphysics, epistemology, mind, science, religion, and politics. Includes topics and ideas not found in his papers.
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  20.  19
    Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell (2007). A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell's Michael Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  21. Richard L. Rohrbaugh (forthcoming). Book Review: The Quest for Home: Household in Mark's Community. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (2):216-218.
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  22. Tristram McPherson (2012). Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: Agent-Neutrality, Moral Epistemology, and Methodology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):445-453.
    Symposium contribution on Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. Argues that Schroeder's account of agent-neutral reasons cannot be made to work, that the limited scope of his distinctive proposal in the epistemology of reasons undermines its plausibility, and that Schroeder faces an uncomfortable tension between the initial motivation for his view and the details of the view he develops.
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  23.  5
    Norman R. Petersen (1980). When is the End Not the End? Literary Reflections on the Ending of Mark's Narrative. Interpretation 34 (2):151-166.
    “…we are left with a choice between saying that Mark was simply incompetent, or that the ending, though strange, is right if rightly (finely) interpreted. We have to explain why a book that begins so triumphantly and makes promises of a certain kind ends in silence and dismay, without fulfilling the promises.”1 (Frank Kermode.).
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  24.  4
    Howard Clark Kee (1978). Mark's Gospel in Recent Research. Interpretation 32 (4):353-368.
    The history of recent research on the Gospel of Mark can be seen as the record of an attempt to discern the aim of the Evangelist and so to discover the perspective which gives coherence to all the features of the Second Gospel.
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  25. Jonathan Dancy (2012). Response to Mark Schroeder's Slaves of the Passions. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 157 (3):455-462.
    Response to Mark Schroeder’s Slaves of the passions Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9656-3 Authors Jonathan Dancy, The University of Reading, Reading, UK Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  26. S. R. Smith (2007). Mark S. Stein, Distributive Justice and Disability: Utilitarianism Against Egalitarianism. Philosophy in Review 27 (1):74.
     
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  27. Duncan McFarland (1999). Mark Johnston's Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C's application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston's "missing-explanation argument" employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are (...)
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  28.  92
    David Enoch (2011). On Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: A Critical Notice of Slaves of the Passions. Philosophical Review 120 (3):423-446.
    In Slaves of the Passions Mark Schroeder puts forward Hypotheticalism, his version of a Humean theory of normative reasons that is capable, so he argues, to avoid many of the difficulties Humeanism is traditionally vulnerable to. In this critical notice, I first outline the main argument of the book, and then proceed to highlight some difficulties and challenges. I argue that these challenges show that Schroeder's improvements on traditional Humeanism – while they do succeed in making the view more (...)
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  29.  22
    Danny Frederick (2014). Review Essay: Mark D. Friedman, 'Nozick’s Libertarian Project: An Elaboration and Defense'. [REVIEW] Reason Papers 36 (1):132-42.
    Review of Mark Friedman's book 'Nozick’s Libertarian Project,' which is a defence of Robert Nozick's 'Anarchy, State, and Utopia.'.
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  30.  9
    D. Cecchetto (2011). Deconstructing Affect: Posthumanism and Mark Hansen's Media Theory. Theory, Culture and Society 28 (5):3-33.
    In the context of the highly contested discourse of posthumanism, this essay examines Mark Hansen’s attempt to give a robust account of technology in its extra-linguistic dimension by evincing an ‘‘‘originary’’ coupling of the human and the technical’ that grounds experience as such . Specifically, I argue that Hansen’s perspective is haunted by the representational logic that it moves against. In this, I do not repudiate Hansen’s argument as such, but rather reject one of its central underlying implications: that (...)
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  31.  2
    Irene McMullin (2015). A Response to Mark D. White’s “A Modest Comment on McMullin: A Kantian Account of Modesty”. Journal of Philosophical Research 40:7-11.
    In response to Mark D. White's Kantian critique of my article "A Modest Proposal: Accounting for the Virtuousness of Modesty," I argue that invoking Kant's notions of dignity and respect in order to provide an egalitarian account of modesty brings with it conceptual commitments that are not always easy to reconcile with the moral phenomenology of that virtue. In light of this I question White's claim that a Kantian account of modesty offers a better explanation than the existential phenomenological (...)
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  32.  10
    Uskali Mäki (2013). Mark Blaug's Unrealistic Crusade for Realistic Economics. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):87-103.
    Mark Blaug’s normative methodology of economics is an attempt to articulate certain intuitions about how economic science could be improved by making it more “realistic”. I discuss two such articulations, one in terms of falsificationist principles, the other in terms of an alleged trade-off between relevance and mathematical rigour. My conclusion is that Blaug’s methodology is itself unrealistic, both descriptively and normatively. His (well intended) methodological prescriptions for the improvement of economics are not based on a systematic, consistent, descriptively (...)
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  33.  20
    Kayley Vernallis (2008). The Gendered-Genre Hierarchy in Mark Tansey's and Vija Celmins' Realist Monochromes. Angelaki 13 (2):125 – 138.
    (2008). the gendered-genre hierarchy in mark tansey's and vija celmins’ realist monochromes. Angelaki: Vol. 13, re-coupling gender and genre, pp. 125-138.
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  34.  10
    John Shoemaker (2003). Epistemological Naturalism and Mark Kaplan's Decision Theory. Philo 6 (2):249-262.
    In Decision Theory as Philosophy, Mark Kaplan reissues a number of perennial questions within decision theory and epistemology, particularly regarding the relevance of decision theory to epistemology and the scope of an epistemology informed by a “modest” Bayesian decision theory. Much of Kaplan’s book represents a challenge to what he calls the “Orthodox” Bayesian theory of decision and evidence. His arguments turn positive in the fourth chapter, in which he argues for the “Assertion View” of belief---an attempted reconciliation of (...)
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  35.  9
    Thomas E. Doyle (2011). Ethics, Nuclear Terrorism, and Counter-Terrorist Nuclear Reprisals – a Response to John Mark Mattox's 'Nuclear Terrorism: The Other Extreme of Irregular Warfare'. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (4):296-308.
    This paper critically examines John Mark Mattox's view of the nature of the moral appropriateness of particular response options. By so doing, I aim to engage the wider readership in a debate, which I hope leads to greater clarity and precision of thinking on these topics. After summarizing Mattox's view, I argue first that in order for Mattox's ultimate conclusion to hold in moral terms, he must abandon the argument on the permissibility of nuclear reprisal to re-establish nuclear deterrence (...)
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  36.  8
    John T. Ramsey (1994). The Senate, Mark Antony, and Caesar's Legislative Legacy. Classical Quarterly 44 (01):130-.
    This paper seeks to dispel the notion that Mark Antony and the Senate indulged in a cat-and-mouse game over the control of Caesar's archives in the weeks immediately following the Ides of March. At stake was whether unpublished documents drawn up by Caesar before his death should be ratified and put into force. The belief that the Senate and Antony contended over this issue and that Antony got the upper hand rests primarily on what I hope to show is (...)
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  37.  39
    Tat-Siong Benny Liew (forthcoming). Book Review: The Temptations of Jesus in Mark's Gospel. [REVIEW] Interpretation 53 (1):89-89.
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  38.  50
    Jennifer Wallis (2010). Book Review: Mark S. Micale, Hysterical Men: The Hidden History of Male Nervous Illness. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):113-116.
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  39.  36
    V. Larcher (2000). Disordered Mother or Disordered Diagnosis? Munchausen By Proxy Syndrome: David B Allison and Mark S Roberts, New Jersey, USA, The Analytic Press Inc, 1998, 279 Pages, Pound31.95. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):145-145.
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  40.  4
    Virginia W. Gerde (2013). Corporate Social Responsibility: An Ethical Approach by Mark S. Schwartz. Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:361-364.
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  41.  3
    Julian Willard (1995). Mark S. McLeod. Rationality and Theistic Belief. Cornell Studies in the Philosophy of Religion. Pp. Xiv + 260. $41.25 Hb. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 31 (2):272.
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  42.  16
    Marilyn Perry (1977). Saint Mark's Trophies: Legend, Superstition, and Archaeology in Renaissance Venice. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 40:27-49.
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  43.  14
    Guy Lancaster (2010). Repairing Eden: Humility, Mysticism, and the Existential Problem of Religious Diversity. By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison and Paradise Mislaid: How We Lost Heaven and How We Can Regain It. ByJeffrey Burton Russell. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (3):540-542.
  44.  4
    Duane Windsor (2013). "Corporate Social Responsibility: An Ethical Approach," by Mark S. Schwartz. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (4):628-632.
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  45.  9
    George W. Harris (1990). Book Review:Integrity: A Philosophical Inquiry. Mark S. Halfon. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (1):188-.
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  46.  6
    Kim Moody (2003). On Seymour Martin Lipset's and Gary Mark's It Didn't Happen Here: Why Socialism Failed in the United States. Historical Materialism 11 (4):347-362.
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  47.  10
    Brian Gregor (2007). Conspiracy and Imprisonment: 1940–1945. By Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Ed. Mark S. Brocker. Transl. Lisa E. Dahillthe Bonhoeffer Legacy: Post-Holocaust Perspectives. By Stephen R. Haynes. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1027–1030.
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  48.  3
    Paul-Émile Langevin (1976). Aloysius M. Ambrozic, The Hidden Kingdom. A Redaction-Critical Study of the References to the Kingdom of God in Mark's Gospel. Washington, D.C., The Catholic Biblical Association of America, 1972 , 280 Pages. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique et Philosophique 32 (1):100.
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  49.  8
    Elizabeth Brake (2002). Book Review: Joram G. Haber and Mark S. Halfon. Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):200-203.
  50.  6
    Anita Silvers (1999). Joram G. Haber and Mark S. Halfon, Eds., Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held:Norms and Values: Essays on the Work of Virginia Held. [REVIEW] Ethics 110 (1):198-201.
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