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Profile: Mark Sainsbury (University of Texas at Austin)
  1. Mark Sainsbury (2013). Fishy Business. Analysis 74 (1):ant098.
    There are problems both with the supposition that ‘fish’ was once used with a meaning that includes whales, and with the supposition that it has always been used with a meaning that excludes them. The problems are illustrated by a trial in 1818 in which the jury ruled that whales are fish.
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  2. Mark Sainsbury (2013). Lessons for Vagueness From Scrambled Sorites. Metaphysica 14 (2):225-237.
    Vagueness demands many boundaries. Each is permissible, in that a thinker may without error use it to distinguish objects, though none is mandatory. This is revealed by a thought experiment—scrambled sorites—in which objects from a sorites series are presented in a random order, and subjects are required to make their judgments without access to any previous objects or their judgments concerning them.
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  3. Mark Sainsbury (2013). The Reference Book. By Hawthorne and Manley. Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. 280, £30. ISBN: 978-0-19-969367-2. [REVIEW] Philosophy 88 (3):475-478.
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  4. Mark Sainsbury & Michael Tye (2013). Seven Puzzles of Thought: And How to Solve Them: An Originalist Theory of Concepts. Oup Oxford.
    Sainsbury and Tye present a new theory, 'originalism', which provides natural, simple solutions to puzzles about thought that have troubled philosophers for centuries. They argue that concepts are to be individuated by their origin, rather than epistemically or semantically. Although thought is special, no special mystery attaches to its nature.
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  5. Mark Sainsbury (2012). A Very Large Fly in the Ointment: Davidsonian Truth Theory Contextualized. In Richard Schantz (ed.), Prospects for Meaning.
    one hand, it raises fundamental doubts about the Davidsonian project, which seems to involve isolating specifically semantic knowledge from any other knowledge or skill in a way reflected by the ideal of homophony. Indexicality forces a departure from this ideal, and so from the aspiration of deriving the truth conditions of an arbitrary utterance on the basis simply of axioms which could hope to represent purely semantic knowledge. In defence of Davidson, I argue that once his original idea for dealing (...)
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  6. Mark Sainsbury (2012). Jody Azzouni , Talking About Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations and Fictions . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (3):154-157.
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  7. Mark Sainsbury (2012). 'Of Course There Are Fictional Characters'. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:615-40.
    There is no straightforward inference from there being fictional characters to any interesting form of realism. One reason is that “fictional” may be an intensional operator with wide scope, depriving the quantifier of its usual force. Another is that not all uses of “there are” are ontologically committing. A realist needs to show that neither of these phenomena are present in “There are fictional characters”. Other roads to realism run into difficulties when negotiating the role that presupposition plays when we (...)
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  8. Mark Sainsbury (2012). Representing Unicorns: How to Think About Intensionality. In G. Currie, P. Kotatko & M. Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications.
    The paper focuses on two apparent paradoxes arising from our use of intensional verbs: first, their object can be something which does not exist, i.e. something which is nothing; second, the fact that entailment from a qualified to a non-qualified object is not guaranteed. In this paper, I suggest that the problems share a solution, insofar as they arise in connection with intensional verbs that ascribe mental states. The solution turns on (I) a properly intensional or nonrelational notion of representation (...)
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  9. Mark Sainsbury (2011). English Speakers Should Use "I" to Refer to Themselves. In Anthony Hatzimoysis (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oup Oxford.
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  10. Mark Sainsbury (2010). Intentionality Without Exotica. In Robin Jeshion (ed.), New Essays on Singular Thought. Oup Oxford.
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  11. Mark Sainsbury (2009). Language and Meaning. In John Shand (ed.), Central Issues in Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  12. Mark Sainsbury (2009). Moral Dilemmas. Think 8 (22):57-63.
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  13. Mark Sainsbury (2008). A Puzzle About How Things Look. In Mm Mccabe & Mark Textor (eds.), Perspectives on Perception.
    Differently illuminated, things in one sense look different, but in another sense look the same.
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  14. Mark Sainsbury, Review of Soames Vol. [REVIEW]
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  15. Mark Sainsbury (2007). Hume's Idea of Necessary Connection/A Idéia de Conexão Necessária Em Hume. Manuscrito 30 (2).
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  16. Mark Sainsbury (2007). Logika filozoficzna. Roczniki Filozoficzne 55 (2):155-222.
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  17. Mark Sainsbury, Cory Juhl, Nicholas Asher, Hans Halvorson, Lawrence Sklar & Jim Hankinson (2006). Tracy Lupher. In Borchert (ed.), Philosophy of Science. Macmillan. 164-202.
     
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  18. Mark Sainsbury (2005). Names in Free Logical Truth Theory. In José Luis Bermúdez (ed.), Thought, Reference, and Experience: Themes From the Philosophy of Gareth Evans. Clarendon Press.
    Evans envisaged a language containing both Russellian and descriptive names. A language with descriptive names, which can contribute to truth conditions even if they have no bearer, needs a free logical truth theory. But a metalanguage with this logic threatens to emasculate Russellian names. The paper details this problem and shows, on Evans's behalf, how it might be resolved.
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  19. Mark Sainsbury (2005). Pleonastic Explanations. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (453):97-111.
    Review of Schiffer, S., "The Things We Mean".
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  20. Mark Sainsbury (2005). Review: Pleonastic Explanations. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (453):97 - 111.
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  21. Mark Sainsbury (2005). Reference Without Referents. Clarendon Press.
    Reference is a central topic in philosophy of language, and has been the main focus of discussion about how language relates to the world. R. M. Sainsbury sets out a new approach to the concept, which promises to bring to an end some long-standing debates in semantic theory. Lucid and accessible, and written with a minimum of technicality, Sainsbury's book also includes a useful historical survey. It will be of interest to those working in logic, mind, and metaphysics as well (...)
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  22. Mark Sainsbury (2004). Referring Descriptions. In Marga Reimer & Anne Bezuidenhout (eds.), Descriptions and Beyond. Clarendon Press.
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  23. Mark Sainsbury (2002). Departing From Frege: Essays in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
    Frege is now regarded as one of the world's greatest philosophers, and the founder of modern logic. Mark Sainsbury argues that we must depart considerably from Frege's views if we are to work towards an adequate conception of natural language. This is an outstanding contribution to philosophy of language and logic and will be invaluable to all those interested in Frege and the philosophy of language.
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  24. Mark Sainsbury (2002). Realism Vs Nominalism About theDispositional-Non-Dispositional Distinction. In Michele Marsonet (ed.), The Problem of Realism. Ashgate. 160.
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  25. Mark Sainsbury (2001). Book Review. Think. A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy Simon Blackburn. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):430-432.
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  26. Mark Sainsbury (1999). Russell. In Ted Honderich (ed.), The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oup Oxford.
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  27. Mark Sainsbury (1997). Humes Idea of Necessary Connection. Manuscrito 20:213-230.
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  28. Jorge Gracia, Terence Horgan, Victoria Iturralde, Manuel Liz, Peter Menzies, Carlos Moya, Philip Pettit, Graham Priest, Mark Sainsbury & Peter Simons (1995). Call for Papers for'SORITES'SORITES is a New Refereed All-English Electronic International Quarterly of Analytical Philosophy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2).
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  29. Mark Sainsbury (1995). Philosophical Logic. In A. C. Grayling (ed.), Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. Oxford University Press.
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  30. T. S. Champlin & Mark Sainsbury (1992). Logical Forms: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):243.
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  31. Kai Nielsen, Michael Pendlebury, Philip Percival, Mark Sainsbury, David Sapire, Charles Sayward, Philip Hugly, Mark Timmons & Terence Horgan (1992). MILLER, Seumas Joint Action. Philosophical Papers 1 (259):65.
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  32. Mark Sainsbury (1992). Sorites Paradoxes and the Transition Question. Philosophical Papers 21 (3):177-190.
    This discusses the kind of paradox that has since become known as "the forced march sorites", here called "the transition question". The question is whether this is really a new kind of paradox, or the familiar sorites in unfamiliar garb. The author argues that resources adequate to deal with ordinary sorites are sufficient to deal with the transition question, and tentatively proposes an affirmative answer.
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  33. Mark Sainsbury (1991). Is There Higher-Order Vagueness? Philosophical Quarterly 41 (163):167-182.
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  34. Mark Sainsbury (1990). Russell Et l'Expérience Directe. Hermès 7:119.
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  35. Mark Sainsbury (1984). Saying and Conveying. Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (4):415 - 432.
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