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  1. Mark Siderits (forthcoming). Buddha. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Mark Siderits (2014). Causation, 'Humean' Causation and Emptiness. Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (4):433-449.
    One strategy Mādhyamikas use to support their claim that nothing has intrinsic nature (svabhāva) is to argue that things with intrinsic nature could not enter into causal relations. But it is not clear that there is a good Madhyamaka argument against ultimate causation that understands causation in ‘Humean’ terms and understands dharmas as tropes. After exploring the rationale behind the intrinsic-nature criterion of dharma-hood, I survey the arguments Mādhyamikas actually give for their claim that anything dependently originated must be devoid (...)
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  3. Mark Siderits (2013). Buddhist Paleocompatibilism. Philosophy East and West 63 (1):73-87.
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  4. Mark Siderits (2013). Dan Arnold: Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):237-241.
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  5. Mark Siderits (2013). Does a Table Have Buddha-Nature? Philosophy East and West 63 (3):373-386.
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  6. Mark Siderits (2013). Determinism, Responsibility, and Asian Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 63 (1):1-3.
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  7. Mark Siderits & Jay L. Garfield (2013). Defending the Semantic Interpretation: A Reply to Ferraro. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (6):655-664.
    In a recent article in this journal, Giuseppe Ferraro mounted a sustained attack on the semantic interpretation of the Madhyamaka doctrine of emptiness, an interpretation that has been championed by the authors. The present paper is their reply to that attack.
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  8. Mark Siderits (2012). Note to Self. The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):104-105.
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  9. Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.) (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Shoryu Katsura, Mark Siderits & Kiyotaka Yoshimizu (2011). Editors' Preface. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):351-352.
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  11. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
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  12. Dan Zahavi, Evan Thompson & Mark Siderits (eds.) (2011). Self, No Self? Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Oxford University Press.
    Self, No Self? is the first book of its kind. It brings together leading philosophical scholars of the Indian and Tibetan traditions with leading Western philosophers of mind and phenomenologists to explore issues about consciousness and selfhood from these multiple perspectives.
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  13. Mark Siderits (2010). Buddhas as Zombies: A Buddhist Reduction of Subjectivity. In Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.), Self, No Self?: Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Oup Oxford.
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  14. Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (2010). Introduction. In Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.), Self, No Self?: Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Oup Oxford.
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  15. Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.) (2010). Self, No Self?: Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Oxford University Press.
    It is time to bring the rich resources of these traditions into the contemporary debate about the nature of self. This volume is the first of its kind.
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  16. Mark Siderits (2009). Is Reductionism Expressible? In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 57--69.
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  17. Mark Siderits (2008). Contradiction in Buddhist Argumentation. Argumentation 22 (1):125-133.
    Certain Buddhist texts contain statements that are prima facie contradictions. The scholarly consensus has been that such statements are meant to serve a rhetorical function that depends on the apparent contradictions being resolvable. But recently it has been claimed that such statements are meant to be taken literally: their authors assert as true statements that are of the form ‘p and not p’. This claim has ramifications for our understanding of the role played by the principle of non-contradiction in Buddhist (...)
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  18. Mark Siderits (2008). Paleo-Compatibilism and Buddhist Reductionism. Sophia 47 (1):29-42.
    Paleo-compatibilism is the view that the freedom required for moral responsibility is not incompatible with determinism about the factors relevant to moral assessment, since the claim that we are free and the claim that the psychophysical elements are causally determined are true in distinct and incommensurable ways. This is to be accounted for by appealing to the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth developed by Buddhist Reductionists. Paleo-compatibilists hold that the illusion of incompatibilism only arises when we illegitimately mix (...)
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  19. Mark Siderits (2007). Buddhism as Philosophy: An Introduction. Hackett Pub. Co..
     
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  20. Mark Siderits (2005). Freedom, Caring and Buddhist Philosophy. Contemporary Buddhism 6 (2):87-116.
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  21. Mark Siderits (2005). The Buddhist Unconscious: The Alaya-Vijnana in the Context of Indian Buddhist Thought (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (2):358-363.
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  22. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book applies (...)
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  23. Mark Siderits (2004). Causation and Emptiness in Early Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (4):393-419.
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  24. Mark Siderits (2004). Perceiving Particulars: A Buddhist Defense. Philosophy East and West 54 (3):367-382.
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  25. Mark Siderits (2003). On the Soteriological Significance of Emptiness. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (1):9-23.
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  26. Mark Siderits (2003). Deductive, Inductive, Both or Neither? Journal of Indian Philosophy 31 (1/3):303-321.
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  27. Mark Siderits (2003). Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy: Empty Persons. Ashgate.
    This book initiates a conversation between the two traditions showing how concepts and tools drawn from one philosophical tradition can help solve problems ...
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  28. Mark Siderits (2001). Buddhism and Techno-Physicalism: Is the Eightfold Path a Program? Philosophy East and West 51 (3):307-314.
    Recent developments in technology and material culture suggest that physicalism may come to be accepted as the commonsense view of the constitution of persons. Like many other spiritual practices, Buddhism has traditionally relied on a dualist understanding of human nature, according to which persons are made up of both physical and nonphysical entities and events. Would anything central to the Buddhist project be lost if that were replaced by physicalism? Clearly the Yogācāra doctrine of consciousness-only would be undermined. But it (...)
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  29. Bina Gupta, Purushottama Bilimoria, Arindam Chakrabarti, David Carr, Eliot Deutsch, Lester Embree, Amedeo Giorgi, Gereon Kopf, Rudolph A. Makkreel, Joseph Margolis, J. N. Mohanty, Günther Patzig, Stephen Philips, Tom Rockmore, Christina Schües, Mark Siderits, David Woodruff Smith & Donn Welton (2000). The Empirical and the Transcendental: A Fusion of Horizons. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this work, a distinguished international group of philosophers offers critical assessments of eminent philosopher J. N. Mohanty's work on phenomenology and Indian philosophy.
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  30. Mark Siderits (2000). Reply to Paul Williams. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 50 (3):453 - 459.
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  31. Mark Siderits (2000). Review: The Reality of Altruism: Reconstructing Śāntideva. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 50 (3):412 - 424.
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  32. Mark Siderits (1997). Buddhist Reductionism. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):455-478.
    While Derek Parfit is aware that his reductionism about persons is anticipated in early Buddhism and Abhidharma, he has not explored that tradition for any clues it might yield concerning the consequences of adopting the position. In this essay, the tradition is used to construct a taxonomy of possible views about persons, and then examine the meta-physical commitments that Buddhist reductionists claim are entailed by their view. While these turn out to be significant, it is argued here that this is (...)
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  33. Mark Siderits (1988). Ehring on Parfit's Relation R. Analysis 48 (January):29-32.
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  34. Mark Siderits (1988). Nāgārjuna as Anti-Realist. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4):311-325.
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  35. Mark Siderits (1988). N?G?Rjuna as Anti-Realist. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (4):311-325.
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  36. Mark Siderits (1987). Beyond Compatibilism: A Buddhist Approach to Freedom and Determinism. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (April):149-59.
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  37. Mark Siderits (1986). The Sense-Reference Distinction in Indian Philosophy of Language. Synthese 69 (1):331-355.
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  38. Mark Siderits (1985). The Prabhakara Mımam. Sa Theory of Related Designation. In B. K. Matilal & J. L. Shaw (eds.), Analytical Philosophy in Comparative Perspective. D. Reidel.
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  39. Mark Siderits (1985). Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning, and Apoha. Journal of Indian Philosophy 13 (2):133-151.
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  40. Mark Siderits (1982). More Things in Heaven and Earth. Journal of Indian Philosophy 10 (2):187-208.
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  41. Mark Siderits (1981). The Madhyamaka Critique of Epistemology II. Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (2):121-160.
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  42. Mark Siderits (1980). Book Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (2).
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  43. Mark Siderits (1980). The Madhyamaka Critique of Epistemology. I. Journal of Indian Philosophy 8 (4):307-335.
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  44. Mark Siderits (1979). A Note on the Early Buddhist Theory of Truth. Philosophy East and West 29 (4):491-499.
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  45. Mark Siderits & J. Dervin O'Brien (1976). Zeno and Nāgārjuna on Motion. Philosophy East and West 26 (3):281-299.
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