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Mark Walker [25]Mark Thomas Walker [12]Mark A. Walker [2]
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Profile: Mark Thomas Walker (University of Birmingham)
Profile: Mark Walker
Profile: Mark Walker (New Mexico State University)
  1. Mark Walker, Uninsured: Heal Thyself.
    on writing prescriptions.[2] These two reasons indicate why there are obvious repercussions for those who do not have reasonable access to physicians’ services. Of course, the word ‘reasonable’ is important here. After all, there is the old joke—for those who enjoy gallows humor—that the U.S. has universal access to healthcare so long as one is willing to commit a crime to see the county jail’s physician, or make one’s self sick enough to qualify for emergency services. Putting aside such extraordinary (...)
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  2. Mark Thomas Walker (forthcoming). The Real Reason Why the Prisoner's Dilemma is Not a Newcomb Problem. Philosophia:1-19.
    It is commonly thought, in line with the position defended in an influential paper by David Lewis, that the decision problems faced in the prisoner’s dilemma and the Newcomb situation are essentially the same problem. José Luis Bermúdez has recently attacked the case Lewis makes for this claim. While I think the claim is false, I contend that Bermúdez’s reason for rejecting Lewis’s argument is inadequate, and then outline what I take to be a better reason for doing so.
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  3. Mark Walker (2014). Eugenic Selection Benefits Embryos. Bioethics 28 (5):214-224.
    The primary question to be addressed here is whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), used for both negative and positive trait selection, benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The phrase ‘potential supernumerary embryos’ is used to indicate that PGD is typically performed on a set of embryos, only some of which will be implanted. Prior to any testing, each embryo in the set is potentially supernumerary in the sense that it may not be selected for implantation. Those embryos that are not selected, and (...)
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  4. Mark Thomas Walker (2012). Kant, Schopenhauer and Morality: Recovering the Categorical Imperative. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction : a great reversal? -- Justifying morality -- Groundwork 3 : an enigmatic text -- The second critique -- Groundwork 2 : rational nature as an end-in-itself? -- From rational agency to freedom -- From freedom to non-phenomenal -- From non-phenomenality to universality -- The identity of persons -- Recovering the categorical imperative.
     
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  5. Mark Walker (2011). Das Deutsche Museum in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus. Eine Bestandaufnahme. Annals of Science 71 (1):1-4.
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  6. Mark Walker (2011). Personal Identity and Uploading. Journal of Evolution and Technology 22 (1):37-52.
    Objections to uploading may be parsed into substrate issues, dealing with the computer platform of upload and personal identity. This paper argues that the personal identity issues of uploading are no more or less challenging than those of bodily transfer often discussed in the philosophical literature. It is argued that what is important in personal identity involves both token and type identity. While uploading does not preserve token identity, it does save type identity; and even qua token, one may have (...)
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  7. Mark Walker (2010). New Light on Science, Medicine, and Engineering Under Hitler. Metascience 19 (3):421-431.
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  8. Mark Walker (2010). Roberto Scazzieri and Raffaella Simili (Eds.): The Migration of Ideas. [REVIEW] Minerva 48 (1):101-104.
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  9. Mark Walker (2009). The Anthropic Argument Against the Existence of God. Sophia 48 (4):351 - 378.
    If God is morally perfect then He must perform the morally best actions, but creating humans is not the morally best action. If this line of reasoning can be maintained then the mere fact that humans exist contradicts the claim that God exists. This is the ‘anthropic argument’. The anthropic argument, is related to, but distinct from, the traditional argument from evil. The anthropic argument forces us to consider the ‘creation question’: why did God not create other gods rather than (...)
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  10. Mark Walker (2009). The Case for Happy-People Pills. Free Inquiry 29 (5):33-36.
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  11. Mark Walker (2009). The Case for Maternity Compensation. Social Theory and Practice 35 (2):279-302.
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  12. Mark Walker (2008). Cognitive Enhancement and the Identity Objection. Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1):108-115.
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  13. Mark Walker (2008). Censorship, Logocracy and Democracy. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence (1):199-226.
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  14. Mark Walker (2008). "Designer Babies" and Harm to Supernumerary Embryos. American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):349 - 364.
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  15. Mark Walker (2008). The Angelic Hierarchy: Aligning Ethical Push and Pull. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
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  16. Mark Walker (2007). Happy-People-Pills and Prosocial Behaviour. Philosophica 79 (1):93-11.
    There is evidence from the empirical sciences that >happiness= B understood in the social scientists= sense of >positive affect=B leads to prosocial behaviour: the happiest amongst us are more likely to help others. There is also scientific evidence of a genetic component to positive affect: genetic differences can account for some of the observed variances in positive affect. Let us think of >happy-people-pills= as pharmacological agents, modeled on those with a genetic predisposition for high levels of positive affect, which will (...)
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  17. Mark Walker (2007). Superlongevity and Utilitarianism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):581 – 595.
    Peter Singer has argued that there are good utilitarian reasons for rejecting the prospect of superlongevity: developing technology to double (or more) the average human lifespan. I argue against Singer's view on two fronts. First, empirical research on happiness indicates that the later years of life are (on average) the happiest, and there is no reason to suppose that this trend would not continue if superlongevity were realized. Second, it is argued that there are good reasons to suppose that there (...)
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  18. Mark Walker (2006). Mark Walker. Minerva 44 (3):241-250.
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  19. Mark A. Walker & Milan M. Ćirković (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285-307.
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  20. Mark A. Walker & M. Milan (2006). Astrophysical Fine Tuning, Naturalism, and the Contemporary Design Argument. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (3):285 – 307.
    Evidence for instances of astrophysical 'fine tuning' (or 'coincidences') is thought by some to lend support to the design argument (i.e. the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). We assess some of the relevant empirical and conceptual issues. We argue that astrophysical fine tuning calls for some explanation, but this explanation need not appeal to the design argument. A clear and strict separation of the issue of anthropic fine tuning on one hand and any form of (...)
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  21. Heidi Campbell & Mark Walker (2005). Religion and Transhumanism: Introducing a Conversation. Journal of Evolution and Technology 14 (2).
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  22. Mark Walker (2004). Skepticism and Nataturalism: Can Philosophical Skepticisim Be Scientifically Tested? Theoria 70 (1):62-97.
    It may be possible to scientifically test philosophical skepticism; at least this is what I shall maintain. The argument develops the naturalistic insight that there may be no particular reason to suppose that nature has selected Homo sapiens’ epistemic capacities such that we are ideally suited to forming a true theory of everything, or indeed, a true theory of much of anything. Just as chimpanzees are cognitively limited - there are many concepts, ideas, and theories beyond their grasp - so (...)
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  23. Mark Thomas Walker (2004). Philosophy Of Language. Philosophical Books 45 (3):241-245.
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  24. Mark Thomas Walker (2003). The Freedom of Judgment. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (1):63-92.
    This is the sequel to my paper 'Against One Form of Judgment-Determinism' ( IJPS , May 2001), wherein I argued that theoretical rationalization, that is, the forming of judgments by way of inference from other judgments, cannot simply be identified with any kind of predetermination of conclusion-judgments by premise-judgments. Taking 'free' to mean 'neither mechanistically explicable nor random' (where something is mechanistically explicable if and only if it is either predetermined or probabilified in a certain way, and is random if (...)
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  25. Mark Thomas Walker (2003). A Problem for Causal Theories of Action. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):84–108.
    Philosophical accounts of "action" standardly take an action to be a doing which _satisfies some description that is semantically related to the content of a propositional attitude of the subject's which _explains why that doing occurred. Causal theories of action require that the explanation in question must involve the causation of action-doings by propositional attitudes (typically intentions, volitions, or combinations of belief and desire). I argue that there are actions whose status, as such, cannot be acknowledged by any causal theory, (...)
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  26. Mark Walker & Milan Cirkovic, Anthropic Reasoning and the Contemporary Design Argument in Astrophysics: A Reply to Robert Klee.
    In a recent study of astrophysical “fine-tunings” (or “coincidences”), Robert Klee critically assesses the support that such astrophysical evidence might be thought to lend to the design argument (i.e., the argument that our universe has been designed by some deity). Klee argues that a proper assessment indicates that the universe is not as “fine-tuned” as advertised by proponents of the design arguments. We argue (i) that Klee’s assessment of the data is, to a certain extent, problematic; and (ii) even if (...)
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  27. Mark Walker (2002). The Fourfold Root of Philosophical Skepticism. Sorites 14 (1):85-109.
    Knowledge may be defined in terms of four necessary conditions: belief, justification, truth and gettier. I argue that a form of philosophical skepticism may be raised with respect to each.
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  28. Mark Thomas Walker (2001). Against One Form of Judgment-Determinism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (2):199 – 227.
    Taking 'rationalized judgments' to be those formed by inference from other judgments, I argue against 'Extreme Determinism': the thesis that theoretical rationalization just is a kind of predetermination of 'conclusion-judgments' by 'premise-judgments'. The argument rests upon two key lemmas: firstly, that a deliberator - in this case, his/her assent to some proposition - to be predetermined (I call this the 'Openness Requirement'): secondly, that a subject's logical insight into his/her premise-judgments must enter into the explanation of any judgment s/he forms (...)
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  29. Mark Thomas Walker (2001). Williams, Truth-Aimedness and the Voluntariness of Judgement. Ratio 14 (1):68–83.
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  30. Mark Thomas Walker (2000). Nietzsche. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (4):509-510.
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  31. Mark Walker (1998). The Voluntariness of Judgment: Reply to Stein. Inquiry 41 (3):333 – 339.
    I have maintained that judgments must be voluntary since, as truth-aimed, they may be represented as responses to practical reasons. Christian Stein has objected that this argument cannot apply to judgments which are not the outcomes of theoretical reasoning. Furthermore, he contends that I have not succeeded in overcoming an argument of H. H. Price's to the effect that judgments which are such outcomes cannot be voluntary. I argue below that neither of these objections can be sustained.
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  32. Mark Thomas Walker (1996). Kant'S Compatibilism. Philosophical Books 37 (4):256-258.
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  33. Mark Thomas Walker (1996). The Voluntariness of Judgment. Inquiry 39 (1):97 – 119.
    While various items closely associated with belief, such as speech?acts of assertion, or what have recently been termed acts of ?acceptance?, can clearly be voluntary, it is commonly supposed that belief itself, being intrinsically truth?directed, is essentially passive. I argue that while this may be true of belief proper, understood as a kind of disposition, it is not true of acts of assent or ?judgment?. Judgments, I contend, must be deemed voluntary precisely because of their truth?aimedness, for in their case (...)
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  34. Mark Walker & W. D. Hackmann (1994). German National Socialism and the Quest for Nuclear Power 1939-1949. Annals of Science 51 (4):448-448.
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  35. Mark Thomas Walker (1993). Punishment - a Tale of Two Islands. Ratio 6 (1):63-71.
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  36. Teresa A. Meade & Mark Walker (eds.) (1991). Science, Medicine, and Cultural Imperialism. St. Martin's Press.
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