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  1. Mark Weaver (2012). The Rule of Saint Francis: What Was Really Lost? Franciscan Studies 69 (1):31-52.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Eleven brothers and sisters followed me in quick succession and the old farm house was bursting at the seams. So Mom and Dad put on a new dining room. Somehow it didn’t fit. It was built differently than the rest of the house. It was out of place, like a new patch on an old shirt. Some parts of the Later Rule of Saint Francis just don’t fit either. (...)
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  2. Mark Weaver (2008). Three Pairs of Brothers and Sisters in Francis's Canticle of the Creatures. Miscellanea Francescana 108 (1-2):260-271.
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  3. David A. Schwartz, Mark Weaver & Stephen Kaplan (1999). A Little Mechanism Can Go a Long Way. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):631-632.
    We propose a way in which Barsalou could strengthen his position and at the same time make a considerable dent in the category/abstraction problem (that he suggests remains unsolved). There exists a class of connectionist models that solves this problem parsimoniously and provides a mechanistic underpinning for the promising high-level architecture he proposes.
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  4. Robert M. French & Mark Weaver (1998). New-Feature Learning: How Common is It? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):26-26.
    The fixed-feature viewpoint Schyns et al. are opposing is not a widely held theoretical position but rather a working assumption of cognitive psychologists – and thus a straw man. We accept their demonstration of new-feature acquisition, but question its ubiquity in category learning. We suggest that new-feature learning (at least in adults) is rarer and more difficult than the authors suggest.
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  5. Michael Hucka, Mark Weaver & Stephen Kaplan (1995). Hebb's Accomplishments Misunderstood. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):635.
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  6. Mark Weaver & Stephen Kaplan (1990). Connectionist Learning and the Challenge of Real Environments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):510-511.
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