Search results for 'Market Clients' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.score: 48.0
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key components of Brenkert’s (...)
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  2. Nanna Mik-Meyer (2006). Identities and Organisations. Evaluating the Personality Traits of Clients in Two Danish Rehabilitation Organizations. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (1):32-48.score: 23.0
    This article explores how the guidelines for personality assessments in two Danish rehabilitation organizations influence the actual evaluation of clients. The analysis shows how staff members produce institutional identities corresponding to organizational categories, which very often have little or no relevance for the clients evaluated. The goal of the article is to demonstrate how the institutional complex that frames the work of the organizations produces the client types pertaining to that organization. The rehabilitation organizations’ local history, legislation, along (...)
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  3. Annilee M. Game & Andros Gregoriou (2014). Do Brokers Act in the Best Interests of Their Clients? New Evidence From Electronic Trading Systems. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3).score: 21.0
    Prior research suggests brokers do not always act in the best interests of clients, although morally obligated to do so. We empirically investigated this issue focusing on trades executed at best execution price, before and after the introduction of electronic limit-order trading, on the London Stock Exchange. As a result of limit-order trading, the proportion of trades executed at the best execution price for the customer significantly increased. We attribute this to a sustained increase in the liquidity of stocks (...)
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  4. John T. Sanders (1977). The Free Market Model Versus Government: A Reply to Nozick. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):35-44.score: 18.0
    In Anarchy, State and Utopia, Robert Nozick argues, first, that free-market anarchism is unstable -that it will inevitably lead back to the state; and, second, that without a certain "redistributive" proviso, the model is unjust. If either of these things is the case, the model defeats itself, for its justification purports to be that it provides a morally acceptable alternative to government (and therefore to the state). I argue, against Nozick's contention, that his "dominant protection agency" neither meets his (...)
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  5. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Why the 'Black Market' Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail. Res Publica 12 (2):163-178.score: 18.0
    One of the most widespread objections to legalizing a market in human organs is that such legalization would stimulate the black market in human organs. Unfortunately, the proponents of this argument fail to explain how such stimulation will occur. To remedy thus, two accounts of how legalizing markets in human organs could stimulate the black market in them are developed in this paper. Yet although these accounts remedy the lacuna in the anti-market argument from the black (...)
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  6. Danny Frederick (2010). A Competitive Market in Human Organs. Libertarian Papers 2 (27):1-21.score: 18.0
    I offer consequentialist and deontological arguments for a competitive market in human organs, from live as well as dead donors. I consider the objections that a market in organs will frustrate altruism, coerce the desperate, expose under-informed agents to unacceptable risks, exacerbate inequality, degrade those who participate in it, involve a kind of slavery, impose invidious costs, and impair third-party choice sets. I show that each of these objections is without merit and that, in consequence, the opposition to (...)
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  7. Tony Smith (1995). The Case Against Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):126-144.score: 18.0
    Free market environmentalists believe that the extension of private property rights and market transactions is sufficient to address environmental difficulties. But there is no invisible hand operating in markets that ensures that environmentally sound practices will be employed just because property rights are in private hands. Also, liability laws and the court systems cannot be relied upon to force polluters to internalize the social costs of pollution. Third, market prices do not provide an objective measure of environmental (...)
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  8. Jan Narveson (1995). The Case for Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):145-156.score: 18.0
    Environmental Ethics is the ethics of how we humans are to relate to each other about the environment we live in. The best way to adjust inevitable differences among us in this respect is by private property. Each person takes the best care of what he owns, and ownership entails the free market, which enables people to make mutually advantageous trades with those who might use it even better. Public regulation, by contrast, becomes management in the interests of the (...)
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  9. David Archard (2002). Selling Yourself: Titmuss's Argument Against a Market in Blood. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 6 (1):87-102.score: 18.0
    This article defends Richard Titmuss''s argument, and PeterSinger''s sympathetic support for it, against orthodoxphilosophical criticism. The article specifies thesense in which a market in blood is ``dehumanising'''' ashaving to do with a loss of ``imagined community'''' orsocial ``integration'''', and not with a loss of valued or``deeper'''' liberty. It separates two ``domino arguments''''– the ``contamination of meaning'''' argument and the``erosion of motivation'''' argument which support, indifferent but interrelated ways, the claim that amarket in blood is ``imperialistic.'''' Concentrating onthe first domino (...)
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  10. Xiaohe Lu (2010). Business Ethics and Karl Marx's Theory of Capital – Reflections on Making Use of Capital for Developing China's Socialist Market Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):95 - 111.score: 18.0
    Making use of capital to develop China’s socialist market economy requires China not only to fully recognize the tendency of capital civilization but also to realize its intrinsic limitations and to seek conditions and a path for overcoming contradictions in the mode of capitalist production. Karl Marx’s theory of capital provides us with a key to understanding and dealing properly with problems of capital. At the same time we should also pay heed to Western research on, experience with, and (...)
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  11. Edward J. Romar (2009). Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek's Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.score: 18.0
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently (...)
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  12. J. Lawrence French (2010). Children's Labor Market Involvement, Household Work, and Welfare: A Brazilian Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):63 - 78.score: 18.0
    The large numbers of children working in developing countries continue to provoke calls for an end to such employment. However, many reformers argue that efforts should focus on ending the exploitation of children rather than depriving them of all opportunities to work. This posture reflects recognition of the multiplicity of needs children have and the diversity of situations in which they work. Unfortunately, research typically neglects these complexities and fails to distinguish between types of labor market jobs, dismisses household (...)
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  13. Attila Tanyi (2000). Piac és igazságosság? (Market and Justice?). Napvilág.score: 18.0
    The aim of the book is to uncover the relation between market and justice through the critical examination of the work of Friedrich Hayek. The book argues for the following thesis: the institution of free market is not the only candidate social system; substantial, not merely formal distributive justice must become the central virtue of our social institutions. Notwithstanding its achievements and virtues, the Hayekian theory makes a simple mistake by equivocating possible social systems, dividing them into two (...)
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  14. Robert Elliott Allinson (2004). Circles Within a Circle: The Condition for the Possibility of Ethical Business Institutions Within a Market System. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):17-28.score: 18.0
    How can a business institution function as an ethical institution within a wider system if the context of the wider system is inherently unethical? If the primary goal of an institution, no matter how ethical it sets out to be, is to function successfully within a market system, how can it reconcile making a profit and keeping its ethical goals intact? While it has been argued that some ethical businesses do exist, e.g., Johnson and Johnson, the argument I would (...)
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  15. X. D. Xu, S. X. Zeng & C. M. Tam (2012). Stock Market's Reaction to Disclosure of Environmental Violations: Evidence From China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):227-237.score: 18.0
    The stock market’s reaction to information disclosure of environmental violation events (EVEs) is investigated multi-dimensionally for Chinese listed companies, including variables such as pollution types, information disclosure sources, information disclosure levels, modernization levels of the region where the company locates, ultimate ownership of the company, and ownership held by the largest shareholder. Using the method of event study, daily abnormal return (AR) and accumulative abnormal return (CAR) are calculated under different event window for examining the extent to which the (...)
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  16. Elizabeth Anderson (2008). How Should Egalitarians Cope with Market Risks? Theoretical Inquiries in Law 9 (1):239-270.score: 18.0
    Individuals in capitalist societies are increasingly exposed to market risks. Luck egalitarian theories, which advocate neutralizing the influence of luck on distribution, fail to cope with this problem, because they focus on the wrong kinds of distributive constraints. Rules of distributive justice can specify (1) acceptable procedures for allocating goods, (2) the range of acceptable variations in distributive outcomes, or (3) which individuals should have which goods, according to individual characteristics such as desert or need. Desert-catering luck egalitarians offer (...)
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  17. Dennis M. Patten (2008). Does the Market Value Corporate Philanthropy? Evidence From the Response to the 2004 Tsunami Relief Effort. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):599 - 607.score: 18.0
    This study investigates the market reaction to corporate press releases announcing donations to the relief effort following the December, 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia. Based on a sample of 79 U.S. companies, results indicate a statistically significant positive 5-day cumulative abnormal return. While differences in the timing of the press releases do not appear to have influenced market reactions, the amount of the donations did. Overall, the results appear to support Godfrey’s (Academy of Management Review 30, 777–798; 2005) (...)
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  18. Leonardo Becchetti & Benjamin Huybrechts (2008). The Dynamics of Fair Trade as a Mixed-Form Market. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):733 - 750.score: 18.0
    This article analyses the Fair Trade sector as a “mixed-form market,” i.e., a market in which different types of players (in this case, nonprofit, co-operative and for-profit organizations) coexist and compete. The purposes of this article are (1) to understand the factors that have led Fair Trade to become a mixed-form market and (2) to propose some trails to understand the market dynamics that result from the interactions between the different types of players. We start by (...)
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  19. Chun-Hsiung Liao & I. -Yu Hsieh (2013). Determinants of Consumer's Willingness to Purchase Gray-Market Smartphones. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):409-424.score: 18.0
    The study analyzes the influential factors of consumers’ willingness to purchase gray-market smartphones by considering the model of novelty seeking, status consumption, integrity, and perceived risk. Attitude toward counterfeit is used as mediation in the model. The causalities in the model of problematic willingness of consumer to purchase gray-market smartphones are hypothesized. A total sample of 350 respondents with 238 effective samples is collected by interviewing with questionnaires at the service counters of telecommunications operators. Structure equation modeling (SEM) (...)
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  20. J. Garcia de Madariaga & C. Valor (2007). Stakeholders Management Systems: Empirical Insights From Relationship Marketing and Market Orientation Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):425-439.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the managerial aspects of the relationship with stakeholders, under the assumption that transfer of knowledge is being made from relationship marketing and market orientation perspectives. These marketing tools may prove useful to manage the relationship with other stakeholders, as has been the case with customers. This study focuses on a sample of Spanish companies representing 43% of listed companies with the largest market capitalization. Given that this is the first time that corporate relationship with stakeholders (...)
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  21. Tassos Michalopoulos, Michiel Korthals & Henk Hogeveen (2008). Trading “Ethical Preferences” in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):3-27.score: 18.0
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, “punishes” in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods (ECHO). The framework applies to “imperceptible,” “pragmatic,” (...)
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  22. Steven E. Kaplan, Pamela B. Roush & Linda Thorne (2007). Andersen and the Market for Lemons in Audit Reports. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):363 - 373.score: 18.0
    Previous accounting ethics research berates auditors for ethical lapses that contribute to the failure of Andersen (e.g., Duska, R.: 2005, Journal of Business Ethics 57, 17–29; Staubus, G.: 2005, Journal of Business Ethics 57, 5–15; however, some of the blame must also fall on regulatory and professional bodies that exist to mitigate auditors’ ethical lapses. In this paper, we consider the ethical and economic context that existed and facilitated Andersen’s failure. Our analysis is grounded in Akerlof’s (1970, Quarterly Journal of (...)
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  23. Felipe Arias Fogliano de Souza Cunha & Carlos Patricio Samanez (2013). Performance Analysis of Sustainable Investments in the Brazilian Stock Market: A Study About the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):19-36.score: 18.0
    In this article, we studied the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE) of the Brazilian Mercantile, Futures and Stock Exchange (BM&FBOVESPA), with the main objective of analyzing the performance of sustainable investments in the Brazilian stock market, during the period from December 2005 to December 2010. To achieve this aim, we characterized ISE portfolios and we compared its performance with the IBOVESPA (representing the market portfolio) and other BM&FBOVESPA sectoral indices. In the performance comparison, we used level of liquidity, return (...)
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  24. A. Askland (2002). Floating Maximally Many Boats: A Preference for the Broad Distribution of Market Benefits. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 40 (1):91 - 99.score: 18.0
    Market economics can overreach and reduce all human activities to market-governed activities. More than a market-inspired explanation for human activities, it offers a normative account of how all goods and services should be distributed by private parties negotiating mutually agreeable terms. This paper argues that market values and practices are constrained by other fundamental values and practices. Liberal values are generally consistent with, though they are not reducible to, market values. Democratic and egalitarian values often (...)
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  25. Danielle Costa Leite Borges (2011). European Health Systems and the Internal Market: Reshaping Ideology? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (4):365-387.score: 18.0
    Departing from theories of distributive justice and their relation with the distribution of health care within society, especially egalitarianism and libertarianism, this paper aims at demonstrating that the approach taken by the European Court of Justice regarding the application of the Internal Market principles (or the market freedoms) to the field of health care services has introduced new values which are more concerned with a libertarian view of health care. Moreover, the paper also addresses the question of how (...)
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  26. Julia Lackmann, Jürgen Ernstberger & Michael Stich (2012). Market Reactions to Increased Reliability of Sustainability Information. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):111-128.score: 18.0
    This article investigates whether investors consider the reliability of companies’ sustainability information when determining the companies’ market value. Specifically, we examine market reactions (in terms of abnormal returns) to events that increase the reliability of companies’ sustainability information but do not provide markets with additional sustainability information. Controlling for competing effects, we regard companies’ additions to an internationally important sustainability index as such events and consider possible determinants for market reactions. Our results suggest that first, investors take (...)
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  27. Peter Martin Jaworski (2013). An Absurd Tax on Our Fellow Citizens: The Ethics of Rent Seeking in the Market Failures (or Self-Regulation) Approach. Journal of Business Ethics (3):1-10.score: 18.0
    Joseph Heath lumps in quotas and protectionist measures with cartelization, taking advantage of information asymmetries, seeking a monopoly position, and so on, as all instances of behavior that can lead to market failures in his market failures approach to business ethics. The problem is that this kind of rent and rent seeking, when they fail to deliver desirable outcomes, are better described as government failure. I suggest that this means we will have to expand Heath’s framework to a (...)
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  28. John White (2002). Education, the Market and the Nature of Personal Well-Being. British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (4):442 - 456.score: 18.0
    A central aim of education has to do with the promotion of the pupil's and other people's well-being. Recent work by John O'Neill locates the strongest justification of the market in an individualistic preference-satisfaction notion of well-being. His own preference for an objective theory of well-being allows us to make a clear separation of educational values from those of the market. Problems in O'Neill's account suggest a third notion of well-being which better supports the separation mentioned.
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  29. Jolanda Dwarswaard, Medard Hilhorst & Margo Trappenburg (2011). The Doctor and the Market: About the Influence of Market Reforms on the Professional Medical Ethics of Surgeons and General Practitioners in The Netherlands. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (4):388-402.score: 18.0
    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2–3 years after a major overhaul of the Dutch health care system involving several market reforms. Surgeons now regularly advertise their work (while this was forbidden in the past) and pay more attention to patients with relatively (...)
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  30. Tony Lynch (2009). Legitimating Market Egoism: The Availability Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):89 - 95.score: 18.0
    It is a common enough view that market agents are self-interested, not benevolent or altruistic – call this market egoism – and that this is morally defensible, even morally required. There are two styles of defence – utilitarian and deontological – and while they differ, they confront a common problem. This is the availability problem. The problem is that the more successful the moral justification of self-interested economic activity, the less there is for the justification to draw upon. (...)
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  31. Sally Power, David Halpin & Geoff Whitty (1997). Managing the State and the Market: 'New' Education Management in Five Countries. British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (4):342 - 362.score: 18.0
    Within the field of education management studies, recent reforms promoting devolution and choice are often seen to provide exciting new opportunities. It is claimed that the 'new' education management, with its emphasis on site-based decision-making and consumer accountability, will enable headteachers and principals to 'take control' of their schools and make them more productive environments in which to work and study. However, our review of research findings from five different countries that are putting in place devolution and choice policies suggests (...)
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  32. Agnė Tikniūtė & Saulė Milčiuvienė (2012). Legal Regulation of Renewable Energy Market. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1495-1513.score: 18.0
    The aim of this article is to address the regulatory framework as one of the key factors determining the success of creation of single market for renewable energy. No one could possibly argue that non-discriminative and consistent legal regulation plays a big role in the creation of a single market. Therefore, the question of legal capability to create the single market for renewable energy and the overall quality of present regulatory framework is at the centre of this (...)
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  33. Eyal Baharad & Doron Kliger (2013). Market Failure in Light of Non-Expected Utility. Theory and Decision 75 (4):599-619.score: 18.0
    This paper merges the non-expected utility approach (Tversky and Kahneman, J Risk Uncertain 5:297–323, 1992 and Quiggin, J Econ Behav Organ 3:323–343, 1982) into Akerlof’s (Quart J Econ 84:488–500, 1970) model of Market for Lemons. We derive the results for different probability weighting functions and analyze the phenomenon of market failure in light of non-expected utility maximization. Our main finding suggests that when the proportion of traded lemons is high (low), the problem of market failure is mitigated (...)
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  34. Anis Ben Brik, Belaid Rettab & Kamel Mellahi (2011). Market Orientation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Business Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (3):307 - 324.score: 18.0
    This study examines the moderating effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the association between market orientation and firm performance in the context of an emerging economy. The results from a sample of firms that operate in Dubai indicate that CSR has a synergistic effect on the impact of market orientation on business performance. The results of our research on the moderating effects of CSR on market orientation subsets reveal that although CSR moderates the association between customer (...)
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  35. Virginijus Kanapinskas & Algimantas Urmonas (2011). Changes of Legal Regulation on Natural Gas Market in the Context of the Third European Union Energy Package. Jurisprudence 18 (1):233-249.score: 18.0
    The article analyzes the changes of legal regulation on natural gas market in the context of the third European Union (EU) energy package. The paper consists of the introduction, two parts and conclusions. The first part analyses the main provisions on the natural gas market of the Third EU energy package. The second part of the paper focuses on the effect of the Third EU energy package on legal regulation of natural gas market in Lithuania. For this (...)
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  36. Chris Mallin & Kean Ow-Yong (2010). The UK Alternative Investment Market — Ethical Dimensions. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):223 - 239.score: 18.0
    The UK Alternative Investment Market (AIM) was launched in 1995 and has been a great success with over 1200 companies now listed. In this article, we examine the development of AIM as it reaches its 15th year and discuss the potential pitfalls of the light touch regulation that is one of the attractions of AIM and identify potential corporate governance and ethical issues that may arise as a result of light touch regulation. We examine the central role of the (...)
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  37. Dan Eugen Ratiu (2010). The Subsidized Muse or the Market-Oriented Muse? Supporting Artistic Creation in Romania Between State Intervention and Art Market. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (13):106-127.score: 18.0
    The analysis focuses on the manner in which public authorities in Romania have carried out their role of supporting artistic creation, as well as on the institutional and financial instruments put into practice for this purpose. First, it is about exposing the contradictory logics that grounds the public action in supporting arts and artists and understanding the character of the State intervention in the cultural field, pointing up its oscillations between mediator and cultural agent roles, neutral and valorizing instance, artistic (...)
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  38. Rick Welsh (2009). Farm and Market Structure, Industrial Regulation and Rural Community Welfare: Conceptual and Methodological Issues. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):21-28.score: 18.0
    The Goldschmidt Hypothesis posits that rural community welfare is negatively associated with the scale of farms surrounding them. The intervening mechanism that links a farm structure dominated by larger farms to negative rural community welfare outcomes is polarized class structure. There have been a number of studies that have found support for the basic relationship between increasing farm scale and negative rural community outcomes. However, since Walter Goldschmidt’s original study was completed in the 1940s, the agricultural market and farming (...)
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  39. E. Algaba, J. M. Bilbao, J. R. Fernández & A. Jiménez (2004). The Lovász Extension of Market Games. Theory and Decision 56 (1-2):229-238.score: 18.0
    The multilinear extension of a cooperative game was introduced by Owen in 1972. In this contribution we study the Lovász extension for cooperative games by using the marginal worth vectors and the dividends. First, we prove a formula for the marginal worth vectors with respect to compatible orderings. Next, we consider the direct market generated by a game. This model of utility function, proposed by Shapley and Shubik in 1969, is the concave biconjugate extension of the game. Then we (...)
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  40. Carolien de Blok, Bert Meijboom, Katrien Luijkx & Jos Schols (2009). Demand-Based Provision of Housing, Welfare and Care Services to Elderly Clients: From Policy to Daily Practice Through Operations Management. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (1):68-84.score: 18.0
    Practical implementation of notions such as patient-orientation, client-centredness, and demand-driven care is far from straightforward in care and service supply to elderly clients living independently. This paper aims to provide preliminary insights into how it is possible to bridge the gap between policy intent, which reflects an increasing client orientation, and actual practice of care and service provision. Differences in personal objectives and characteristics generate different sets of needs among elderly clients that must have an appropriate response in (...)
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  41. Josée Johnston & Michelle Szabo (2011). Reflexivity and the Whole Foods Market Consumer: The Lived Experience of Shopping for Change. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):303-319.score: 18.0
    There has been widespread academic and popular debate about the transformative potential of consumption choices, particularly food shopping. While popular food media is optimistic about “shopping for change,” food scholars are more critical, drawing attention to fetishist approaches to “local” or “organic,” and suggesting the need for reflexive engagement with food politics. We argue that reflexivity is central to understanding the potential and limitations of consumer-focused food politics, but argue that this concept is often relatively unspecified. The first objective of (...)
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  42. John Smithers & Alun E. Joseph (2010). The Trouble with Authenticity: Separating Ideology From Practice at the Farmers' Market. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):239-247.score: 18.0
    Farmers’ markets have enjoyed a resurgence in the past two decades in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. This increase in popularity is attributed to a host of environmental, social, and economic factors, often related to the alleged benefits of local food, alternative farming, and producer–consumer interactions. Steeped in tradition, there are also widely held assumptions related to the type of food and food vendors that belong at a farmers’ market in addition to the type of experience (...)
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  43. Jung Mo Sung (2014). Mercado religioso e mercado como religião (Religious Market and Market as Religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2014v12n34p290. [REVIEW] Horizonte 12 (34):290-315.score: 18.0
    A teoria do mercado religioso parte da constatação do pluralismo religioso e chega à conclusão que, em tal situação, religião se torna um assunto de escolha pessoal ou familiar e se estabelece uma situação de concorrência entre as religiões subordinada à lógica da economia de mercado. Assim, as religiões reduzidas à esfera da vida privada não podem mais realizar a função tradicional das religiões de legitimar a totalidade da ordem social. Este artigo analisa a tese da subordinação da religião à (...)
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  44. Sinivaldo Silva Tavares (2014). Entre a cruz e a espada: religião no mundo da tecnociência, do mercado e da mídia (Between the devil and the deep blue sea: religion in the world of technoscience, market and media) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5811.2014v12n34p382. [REVIEW] Horizonte 12 (34):382-401.score: 18.0
    Vivemos, hoje, sob a hegemonia do paradigma tecnocêntrico, mercadológico e midiático. A Tecnociência, o Mercado e a Mídia se constituem em autênticos horizontes no interior dos quais se desvelam todos os âmbitos da experiência humana. Isso posto, o que o ser humano e a religião se tornam nessa nova situação epocal? A Tecnociência tornou-se horizonte de compreensão do ser humano em relação ao mundo e si próprio. Não apenas nossos estilos de vida, nosso modo de trabalhar e viver, são condicionados (...)
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  45. Pedro Assis Ribeiro de Oliveira (2014). Religião e Sacralidade nas sociedades de mercado (Religion and sacredness in market-based societies) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2014v12n34p316. [REVIEW] Horizonte 12 (34):316-338.score: 18.0
    Este artigo tem por objeto o estudo do lugar da religião nas sociedades de mercado. Para isso coloca em questão o conceito de religião como a expressão de fé em entes transcendentes ou sobrenaturais, porque ele se aplica bem a religiões deístas como o cristianismo, mas deixa em segundo plano o fundamento mesmo do fenômeno religioso: a sacralidade. Recuperando a teoria de Durkheim, este artigo parte da hipótese de que a sacralidade é fundamental também nas sociedades de mercado. Abandonando o (...)
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  46. Sandu Frunza & Mihaela Frunza (2010). Philosophy and the Labor Market in Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):28-58.score: 18.0
    One of the problems the institutional crisis of philosophy is facing in Romania is the difficulty of philosophy graduates to find a suitable place on the complex labor market. The article attempts to elucidate whether philosophy graduates subsequently teach what they study during their university education and to find solutions for a better integration on the labor market of these graduates. An important part of the article is dedicated to analyzing the institutional offer vis-à-vis the challenges that philosophy (...)
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  47. Shaun P. Hargreaves Heap, Jonathan Hw Tan & Daniel John Zizzo (2013). Trust, Inequality and the Market. Theory and Decision 74 (3):311-333.score: 18.0
    This article examines, experimentally, whether inequality affects the social capital of trust in non-market and market settings. We consider three experimental treatments, one with equality, one with inequality but no knowledge of the income of other agents, and one with inequality and knowledge. Inequality, particularly when it is known, has a corrosive effect on trusting behaviours in this experiment. Agents appear to be less sensitive to known relative income differentials in markets than they are in the non-market (...)
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  48. Inga Jessica Nkusi, Semhar Habtezghi & Harald Dolles (forthcoming). Entrepreneurship and the Carbon Market: Opportunities and Challenges for South African Entrepreneurs. [REVIEW] AI and Society:1-19.score: 18.0
    The Kyoto Protocol and its implementation brought forward issues of climate change and its mitigation strategy by national measures through the creation of market mechanisms in carbon trading. The trading of emission certificates has become an important trade commodity worldwide, and its markets have diversified. While this opportunity has created new markets for entrepreneurs and actors that range from farmers to brokers, unequal involvement in most developing countries is noted. This has been mostly observed in those countries where entrepreneurship (...)
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  49. Algimantas Urmonas & Virginijus Kanapinskas (2010). Key Elements of the Legal Status of the Natural Gas Market Regulatory Institutions in Lithuania and in the European Union Member States: A Comparative Analysis. Jurisprudence 120 (2):379-395.score: 18.0
    The article analyses the legal status of the natural gas market regulatory institutions in Lithuania and in the member states of the European Union. First, the authors assess the most important elements of the legal status of the natural gas market regulators in the EU member states, namely, the degree of autonomy (type of institution, appointment and dismissal procedures of management, duration of the terms of office, sources of funding) and the measures aimed at ensuring accountability, transparency, and (...)
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  50. Peer Zumbansen (2003). Public Values, Private Contractsand the Colliding Worlds of Family and Market:German Federal Constitutional Court,`Marital Agreement' Decisions of 6 February2001 and 29 March 2001. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (1):71-84.score: 18.0
    In two decisions delivered inFebruary and March 2001, the German FederalConstitutional Court voided the maritalagreements struck between a man and a pregnantwoman on the grounds that they were the productof an inequality of bargaining power betweenthe parties. These findings, involving anapplication of the fundamental rightsprovisions of the German Basic Law to privateagreements, demonstrate the creeping competenceof the F.C.C. into the sphere of contractualrelations and an ongoing questioning ofthe traditional public/private law divide. Exploring some of the implications of applyingpublic values and (...)
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