Search results for 'Market Clients' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  55
    David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key components of Brenkert’s (...)
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  2.  1
    Annilee M. Game & Andros Gregoriou (2016). Do Brokers Act in the Best Interests of Their Clients? New Evidence From Electronic Trading Systems. Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (2):187-197.
    Prior research suggests brokers do not always act in the best interests of clients, although morally obligated to do so. We empirically investigated this issue focusing on trades executed at best execution price, before and after the introduction of electronic limit-order trading, on the London Stock Exchange. As a result of limit-order trading, the proportion of trades executed at the best execution price for the customer significantly increased. We attribute this to a sustained increase in the liquidity of stocks (...)
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  3.  1
    Nanna Mik-Meyer (2006). Identities and Organisations. Evaluating the Personality Traits of Clients in Two Danish Rehabilitation Organizations. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 8 (1):32-48.
    This article explores how the guidelines for personality assessments in two Danish rehabilitation organizations influence the actual evaluation of clients. The analysis shows how staff members produce institutional identities corresponding to organizational categories, which very often have little or no relevance for the clients evaluated. The goal of the article is to demonstrate how the institutional complex that frames the work of the organizations produces the client types pertaining to that organization. The rehabilitation organizations’ local history, legislation, along (...)
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  4.  8
    Bob Brecher, Complicity and Modularization: How Universities Were Made Safe for the Market.
    Education has always occupied a contradictory position in society, expected to ensure compliance and continuity and yet to encourage critique and renewal. Since the early 1980s, however, successive UK governments have directly mobilised education, and higher education in particular, as an ideological tool in the task of embedding neo-liberalism as ‘common sense’. Modularisation has been in the vanguard, first in the universities, more latterly at secondary level. The effect has been disastrous: here as elsewhere, choice has become depressingly fetishised; knowledge, (...)
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  5.  11
    Julian Baggini (2010). Floated on the Ideas Market. The Philosophers' Magazine 49:75-76.
    “I would go into a lunch of stockbrokers who would be coming to listen to the business philosopher, and I felt so nervous because I thought I was supposed to tell them where they should be putting their clients’ money on the basis of my knowledge of the history of ideas. I felt such a failure because I didn’t know what they should do with their clients’ funds.”.
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  6. Sandro Castaldo, Francesco Perrini, Nicola Misani & Antonio Tencati (2009). The Missing Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Trust: The Case of Fair Trade Products. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):1 - 15.
    This paper investigates the link between the consumer perception that a company is socially oriented and the consumer intention to buy products marketed by that company. We suggest that this link exists when at least two conditions prevail: (1) the products sold by that company comply with ethical and social requirements; (2) the company has an acknowledged commitment to protect consumer rights and interests. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a survey among the clients of retail chains offering Fair (...)
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  7.  16
    Devin G. Pope (2016). Exploring Psychology in the Field: Steps and Examples From the Used‐Car Market. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2).
    The growing availability of large datasets in a variety of domains presents an opportunity for researchers to use field data to better understand psychological concepts. I discuss, from an empirical economics point of view, steps for how to study cognition in large datasets. I use two recent papers that explore psychology in the used-car market as motivating examples. These examples help illustrate the potential importance of big data as a way to explore human psychology and cognition.
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  8.  37
    Leonardo Becchetti & Benjamin Huybrechts (2008). The Dynamics of Fair Trade as a Mixed-Form Market. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):733 - 750.
    This article analyses the Fair Trade sector as a “mixed-form market,” i.e., a market in which different types of players (in this case, nonprofit, co-operative and for-profit organizations) coexist and compete. The purposes of this article are (1) to understand the factors that have led Fair Trade to become a mixed-form market and (2) to propose some trails to understand the market dynamics that result from the interactions between the different types of players. We start by (...)
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  9.  28
    S. Prakash Sethi (2005). Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds – Because There is No Better Alternative. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99 - 129.
    >With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporations long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a companys long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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  10.  16
    Dennis M. Patten (2008). Does the Market Value Corporate Philanthropy? Evidence From the Response to the 2004 Tsunami Relief Effort. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):599 - 607.
    This study investigates the market reaction to corporate press releases announcing donations to the relief effort following the December, 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia. Based on a sample of 79 U.S. companies, results indicate a statistically significant positive 5-day cumulative abnormal return. While differences in the timing of the press releases do not appear to have influenced market reactions, the amount of the donations did. Overall, the results appear to support Godfrey’s (Academy of Management Review 30, 777–798; 2005) (...)
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  11.  4
    Tzu-Kuan Chiu (2013). Putting Responsible Finance to Work for Citi Microfinance. Journal of Business Ethics (2):1-16.
    This paper develops an ethical framework for responsible finance and then applies it to Citigroup (Citi), a major financial actor in the microfinance sector, to see whether it meets with such obligations. The framework consists of two categories of responsibility. The first category is the special social responsibility of financial institutions; and the second is the fundamental principles of ethical behavior in financial services. From Citigroup’s microfinance model, scope of business, and multiple roles in the market, the company seems (...)
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  12.  63
    Michael Fuerstein (2015). Contesting the Market: An Assessment of Capitalism's Threat to Democracy. In Subramanian Rangan (ed.), Performance and Progress: Essays on Capitalism, Business, and Society. Oxford University Press
    I argue that capitalism presents a threat to “democratic contestation”: the egalitarian, socially distributed capacity to affect how, why, and whether power is used. Markets are not susceptible to mechanisms of accountability, nor are they bearers of intentions in the way that political power-holders are. This makes them resistant to the kind of rational, intentional oversight that constitutes one of democracy’s social virtues. I identify four social costs associated with this problem: the vulnerability of citizens to arbitrary interference, the insensitivity (...)
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  13. Danny Frederick (2010). A Competitive Market in Human Organs. Libertarian Papers 2 (27):1-21.
    I offer consequentialist and deontological arguments for a competitive market in human organs, from live as well as dead donors. I consider the objections that a market in organs will frustrate altruism, coerce the desperate, expose under-informed agents to unacceptable risks, exacerbate inequality, degrade those who participate in it, involve a kind of slavery, impose invidious costs, and impair third-party choice sets. I show that each of these objections is without merit and that, in consequence, the opposition to (...)
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  14.  18
    X. D. Xu, S. X. Zeng & C. M. Tam (2012). Stock Market's Reaction to Disclosure of Environmental Violations: Evidence From China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):227-237.
    The stock market’s reaction to information disclosure of environmental violation events (EVEs) is investigated multi-dimensionally for Chinese listed companies, including variables such as pollution types, information disclosure sources, information disclosure levels, modernization levels of the region where the company locates, ultimate ownership of the company, and ownership held by the largest shareholder. Using the method of event study, daily abnormal return (AR) and accumulative abnormal return (CAR) are calculated under different event window for examining the extent to which the (...)
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  15. John T. Sanders (1977). The Free Market Model Versus Government: A Reply to Nozick. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):35-44.
    In Anarchy, State and Utopia, Robert Nozick argues, first, that free-market anarchism is unstable -that it will inevitably lead back to the state; and, second, that without a certain "redistributive" proviso, the model is unjust. If either of these things is the case, the model defeats itself, for its justification purports to be that it provides a morally acceptable alternative to government (and therefore to the state). I argue, against Nozick's contention, that his "dominant protection agency" neither meets his (...)
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  16.  28
    Elizabeth Anderson (2008). How Should Egalitarians Cope with Market Risks? Theoretical Inquiries in Law 9 (1):239-270.
    Individuals in capitalist societies are increasingly exposed to market risks. Luck egalitarian theories, which advocate neutralizing the influence of luck on distribution, fail to cope with this problem, because they focus on the wrong kinds of distributive constraints. Rules of distributive justice can specify (1) acceptable procedures for allocating goods, (2) the range of acceptable variations in distributive outcomes, or (3) which individuals should have which goods, according to individual characteristics such as desert or need. Desert-catering luck egalitarians offer (...)
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  17.  9
    Julia Lackmann, Jürgen Ernstberger & Michael Stich (2012). Market Reactions to Increased Reliability of Sustainability Information. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):111-128.
    This article investigates whether investors consider the reliability of companies’ sustainability information when determining the companies’ market value. Specifically, we examine market reactions (in terms of abnormal returns) to events that increase the reliability of companies’ sustainability information but do not provide markets with additional sustainability information. Controlling for competing effects, we regard companies’ additions to an internationally important sustainability index as such events and consider possible determinants for market reactions. Our results suggest that first, investors take (...)
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  18.  29
    Robert Elliott Allinson (2004). Circles Within a Circle: The Condition for the Possibility of Ethical Business Institutions Within a Market System. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):17-28.
    How can a business institution function as an ethical institution within a wider system if the context of the wider system is inherently unethical? If the primary goal of an institution, no matter how ethical it sets out to be, is to function successfully within a market system, how can it reconcile making a profit and keeping its ethical goals intact? While it has been argued that some ethical businesses do exist, e.g., Johnson and Johnson, the argument I would (...)
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  19.  4
    Devin G. Pope (2016). Exploring Psychology in the Field: Steps and Examples From the Used‐Car Market. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):n/a-n/a.
    The growing availability of large datasets in a variety of domains presents an opportunity for researchers to use field data to better understand psychological concepts. I discuss, from an empirical economics point of view, steps for how to study cognition in large datasets. I use two recent papers that explore psychology in the used-car market as motivating examples. These examples help illustrate the potential importance of big data as a way to explore human psychology and cognition.
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  20.  9
    Josée Johnston & Michelle Szabo (2011). Reflexivity and the Whole Foods Market Consumer: The Lived Experience of Shopping for Change. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):303-319.
    There has been widespread academic and popular debate about the transformative potential of consumption choices, particularly food shopping. While popular food media is optimistic about “shopping for change,” food scholars are more critical, drawing attention to fetishist approaches to “local” or “organic,” and suggesting the need for reflexive engagement with food politics. We argue that reflexivity is central to understanding the potential and limitations of consumer-focused food politics, but argue that this concept is often relatively unspecified. The first objective of (...)
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  21.  8
    Anis Ben Brik, Belaid Rettab & Kamel Mellahi (2011). Market Orientation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Business Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (3):307 - 324.
    This study examines the moderating effects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the association between market orientation and firm performance in the context of an emerging economy. The results from a sample of firms that operate in Dubai indicate that CSR has a synergistic effect on the impact of market orientation on business performance. The results of our research on the moderating effects of CSR on market orientation subsets reveal that although CSR moderates the association between customer (...)
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  22.  7
    John Smithers & Alun E. Joseph (2010). The Trouble with Authenticity: Separating Ideology From Practice at the Farmers' Market. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):239-247.
    Farmers’ markets have enjoyed a resurgence in the past two decades in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. This increase in popularity is attributed to a host of environmental, social, and economic factors, often related to the alleged benefits of local food, alternative farming, and producer–consumer interactions. Steeped in tradition, there are also widely held assumptions related to the type of food and food vendors that belong at a farmers’ market in addition to the type of experience (...)
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  23.  60
    Shaun P. Hargreaves Heap, Jonathan Hw Tan & Daniel John Zizzo (2013). Trust, Inequality and the Market. Theory and Decision 74 (3):311-333.
    This article examines, experimentally, whether inequality affects the social capital of trust in non-market and market settings. We consider three experimental treatments, one with equality, one with inequality but no knowledge of the income of other agents, and one with inequality and knowledge. Inequality, particularly when it is known, has a corrosive effect on trusting behaviours in this experiment. Agents appear to be less sensitive to known relative income differentials in markets than they are in the non-market (...)
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  24.  16
    J. Garcia de Madariaga & C. Valor (2007). Stakeholders Management Systems: Empirical Insights From Relationship Marketing and Market Orientation Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):425-439.
    This paper explores the managerial aspects of the relationship with stakeholders, under the assumption that transfer of knowledge is being made from relationship marketing and market orientation perspectives. These marketing tools may prove useful to manage the relationship with other stakeholders, as has been the case with customers. This study focuses on a sample of Spanish companies representing 43% of listed companies with the largest market capitalization. Given that this is the first time that corporate relationship with stakeholders (...)
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  25. James Stacey Taylor (2006). Why the 'Black Market' Arguments Against Legalizing Organ Sales Fail. Res Publica 12 (2):163-178.
    One of the most widespread objections to legalizing a market in human organs is that such legalization would stimulate the black market in human organs. Unfortunately, the proponents of this argument fail to explain how such stimulation will occur. To remedy thus, two accounts of how legalizing markets in human organs could stimulate the black market in them are developed in this paper. Yet although these accounts remedy the lacuna in the anti-market argument from the black (...)
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  26.  51
    David Archard (2002). Selling Yourself: Titmuss's Argument Against a Market in Blood. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 6 (1):87-102.
    This article defends Richard Titmuss''s argument, and PeterSinger''s sympathetic support for it, against orthodoxphilosophical criticism. The article specifies thesense in which a market in blood is ``dehumanising'''' ashaving to do with a loss of ``imagined community'''' orsocial ``integration'''', and not with a loss of valued or``deeper'''' liberty. It separates two ``domino arguments''''– the ``contamination of meaning'''' argument and the``erosion of motivation'''' argument which support, indifferent but interrelated ways, the claim that amarket in blood is ``imperialistic.'''' Concentrating onthe first domino (...)
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  27.  11
    Peter Martin Jaworski (2013). An Absurd Tax on Our Fellow Citizens: The Ethics of Rent Seeking in the Market Failures (or Self-Regulation) Approach. Journal of Business Ethics (3):1-10.
    Joseph Heath lumps in quotas and protectionist measures with cartelization, taking advantage of information asymmetries, seeking a monopoly position, and so on, as all instances of behavior that can lead to market failures in his market failures approach to business ethics. The problem is that this kind of rent and rent seeking, when they fail to deliver desirable outcomes, are better described as government failure. I suggest that this means we will have to expand Heath’s framework to a (...)
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  28.  9
    K. Grit & A. de Bont (2010). Tailor-Made Finance Versus Tailor-Made Care. Can the State Strengthen Consumer Choice in Healthcare by Reforming the Financial Structure of Long-Term Care? Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):79-83.
    Background Policy instruments based on the working of markets have been introduced to empower consumers of healthcare. However, it is still not easy to become a critical consumer of healthcare. Objectives The aim of this study is to analyse the possibilities of the state to strengthen the position of patients with the aid of a new financial regime, such as personal health budgets. Methods Data were collected through in-depth interviews with executives, managers, professionals and client representatives of six long-term care (...)
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  29. Tony Smith (1995). The Case Against Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):126-144.
    Free market environmentalists believe that the extension of private property rights and market transactions is sufficient to address environmental difficulties. But there is no invisible hand operating in markets that ensures that environmentally sound practices will be employed just because property rights are in private hands. Also, liability laws and the court systems cannot be relied upon to force polluters to internalize the social costs of pollution. Third, market prices do not provide an objective measure of environmental (...)
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  30.  36
    J. Lawrence French (2010). Children's Labor Market Involvement, Household Work, and Welfare: A Brazilian Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):63-78.
    The large numbers of children working in developing countries continue to provoke calls for an end to such employment. However, many reformers argue that efforts should focus on ending the exploitation of children rather than depriving them of all opportunities to work. This posture reflects recognition of the multiplicity of needs children have and the diversity of situations in which they work. Unfortunately, research typically neglects these complexities and fails to distinguish between types of labor market jobs, dismisses household (...)
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  31.  8
    John White (2002). Education, the Market and the Nature of Personal Well-Being. British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (4):442 - 456.
    A central aim of education has to do with the promotion of the pupil's and other people's well-being. Recent work by John O'Neill locates the strongest justification of the market in an individualistic preference-satisfaction notion of well-being. His own preference for an objective theory of well-being allows us to make a clear separation of educational values from those of the market. Problems in O'Neill's account suggest a third notion of well-being which better supports the separation mentioned.
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  32.  11
    Rick Welsh (2009). Farm and Market Structure, Industrial Regulation and Rural Community Welfare: Conceptual and Methodological Issues. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):21-28.
    The Goldschmidt Hypothesis posits that rural community welfare is negatively associated with the scale of farms surrounding them. The intervening mechanism that links a farm structure dominated by larger farms to negative rural community welfare outcomes is polarized class structure. There have been a number of studies that have found support for the basic relationship between increasing farm scale and negative rural community outcomes. However, since Walter Goldschmidt’s original study was completed in the 1940s, the agricultural market and farming (...)
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  33.  91
    Jan Narveson (1995). The Case for Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):145-156.
    Environmental Ethics is the ethics of how we humans are to relate to each other about the environment we live in. The best way to adjust inevitable differences among us in this respect is by private property. Each person takes the best care of what he owns, and ownership entails the free market, which enables people to make mutually advantageous trades with those who might use it even better. Public regulation, by contrast, becomes management in the interests of the (...)
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  34.  1
    Nicky Jacobs & David Harvey (2010). The Extent to Which Teacher Attitudes and Expectations Predict Academic Achievement of Final Year Students. Educational Studies 36 (2):195-206.
    Competition in the market is a perennial and ever‐increasing problem for independent schools. How schools can meet this pressure and find ways to attract students is a continuing question and one that will get more onerous as the government funding for education is, in relative terms, decreasing. One of the ways in which schools can show their worth is the attraction of the best teachers and being able to show potential clients how their staff contribute to the academic (...)
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  35.  21
    Tassos Michalopoulos, Michiel Korthals & Henk Hogeveen (2008). Trading “Ethical Preferences” in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):3-27.
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, “punishes” in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods (ECHO). The framework applies to “imperceptible,” “pragmatic,” (...)
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  36.  12
    Anna Zarkada-Fraser (2000). A Classification of Factors Influencing Participating in Collusive Tendering Agreements. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (3):269 - 282.
    The morality of tendering practices is an issue of economic and social significance, especially when large government contracts are involved. Criticisms are mostly concentrated around collusive tendering: illegal agreements between tenderers that result in seemingly competitive bids, price fixing or market distribution schemes that circumvent the spirit of free competition and defraud clients. Although collusion has been identified as an endemic malaise of tendering, its behavioural and moral dimensions have not been systematically studied before. The paper addresses this (...)
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  37.  7
    Tony Lynch (2009). Legitimating Market Egoism: The Availability Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):89 - 95.
    It is a common enough view that market agents are self-interested, not benevolent or altruistic – call this market egoism – and that this is morally defensible, even morally required. There are two styles of defence – utilitarian and deontological – and while they differ, they confront a common problem. This is the availability problem. The problem is that the more successful the moral justification of self-interested economic activity, the less there is for the justification to draw upon. (...)
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  38.  17
    Steven E. Kaplan, Pamela B. Roush & Linda Thorne (2007). Andersen and the Market for Lemons in Audit Reports. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):363 - 373.
    Previous accounting ethics research berates auditors for ethical lapses that contribute to the failure of Andersen (e.g., Duska, R.: 2005, Journal of Business Ethics 57, 17–29; Staubus, G.: 2005, Journal of Business Ethics 57, 5–15; however, some of the blame must also fall on regulatory and professional bodies that exist to mitigate auditors’ ethical lapses. In this paper, we consider the ethical and economic context that existed and facilitated Andersen’s failure. Our analysis is grounded in Akerlof’s (1970, Quarterly Journal of (...)
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  39.  7
    Kor Grit & Teun Zuiderent-Jerak (forthcoming). Making Markets in Long-Term Care: Or How a Market Can Work by Being Invisible. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    Many Western countries have introduced market principles in healthcare. The newly introduced financial instrument of “care-intensity packages” in the Dutch long-term care sector fit this development since they have some characteristics of a market device. However, policy makers and care providers positioned these instruments as explicitly not belonging to the general trend of marketisation in healthcare. Using a qualitative case study approach, we study the work that the two providers have done to fit these instruments to their organisations (...)
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  40.  4
    Malcolm Carey (2007). Some Ethical Dilemmas for Agency Social Workers. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):342-347.
    This article considers some ethical consequences which are linked to the more recent rapid expansion in contingency social work. It is noted that increased privatisation within state social work has led to a much greater reliance upon flexible labour. Consequentially, the relationship between temporary workers and clients has altered, and new beliefs and attitudes have formed amongst some employees who lack permanency. With reference to Nietzsche, Marx and Hobbes, it is suggested that if this political process of market-led (...)
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  41.  8
    G. Mayagoitia & José Barragán (2010). Inventario: Factor Determinante En la Competitividad de Los Negocios (Inventory: Key Element on Business Competitiveness). Daena 5 (2):219-238.
    . All personal that belong to a company, has to be consider into their daily agenda theoptimization of the inventory, in matter of create a cost reduction into the organization, an finallyincrement the productivity.The inventory is the element that gives “live” to the companies, in the moment to be manufacturedinto a product, through the works stations, is the case, that the excess of inventory will force thecompany not invert into development, research, training, technology, etc., and this situation willaffect competiveness, and (...)
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  42.  52
    Xiaohe Lu (2010). Business Ethics and Karl Marx's Theory of Capital – Reflections on Making Use of Capital for Developing China's Socialist Market Economy. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):95 - 111.
    Making use of capital to develop China’s socialist market economy requires China not only to fully recognize the tendency of capital civilization but also to realize its intrinsic limitations and to seek conditions and a path for overcoming contradictions in the mode of capitalist production. Karl Marx’s theory of capital provides us with a key to understanding and dealing properly with problems of capital. At the same time we should also pay heed to Western research on, experience with, and (...)
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  43.  44
    Edward J. Romar (2009). Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek's Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently (...)
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  44.  11
    Amy Snow Landa & Carl Elliott (2013). From Community to Commodity: The Ethics of Pharma‐Funded Social Networking Sites for Physicians. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (3):673-679.
    A growing number of doctors in the United States are joining online professional networks that cater exclusively to licensed physicians. The most popular are Sermo, with more than 135,000 members, and Doximity, with more than 100,000. Both companies claim to offer a valuable service by enabling doctors to “connect” in a secure online environment. But their business models raise ethical concerns. The sites generate revenue by selling access to their large networks of physician-users to clients that include global pharmaceutical (...)
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  45.  4
    Andrew Samuels (1993). The Political Psyche. Routledge.
    A radical and original study, The Political Psyche joins together depth psychology with politics in a way that fully reflects the discoveries made in analysis and therapy. In an attempt to show that an inner journey and a desire to fashion something practical out of passionate political convictions are linked projects, author Andrew Samuels brings an acute psychological perspective to political issues such as the distribution of wealth, the market economy, Third World development, environmentalism, and nationalism--expanding and enhancing our (...)
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  46.  5
    Patricia Shipley (2000). Is Practical Philosophy for Private Profit or Public Good? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (4):65-74.
    This paper takes a critical look at the rise of the practice of philosophy in the market place in late modernity. Two main forms of such practice are identified: the practice of Socratic Dialogue in small groups in organisations and one-to-one philosophical counselling of individual 'clients'. The relevance of professionalism for commercialised applied practical philosophy is discussed. Philosophical counsellors in particular may be at risk of engaging with vulnerable individuals who are in need of protection from practitioners who (...)
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  47.  10
    Eyal Baharad & Doron Kliger (2013). Market Failure in Light of Non-Expected Utility. Theory and Decision 75 (4):599-619.
    This paper merges the non-expected utility approach (Tversky and Kahneman, J Risk Uncertain 5:297–323, 1992 and Quiggin, J Econ Behav Organ 3:323–343, 1982) into Akerlof’s (Quart J Econ 84:488–500, 1970) model of Market for Lemons. We derive the results for different probability weighting functions and analyze the phenomenon of market failure in light of non-expected utility maximization. Our main finding suggests that when the proportion of traded lemons is high (low), the problem of market failure is mitigated (...)
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  48.  19
    Joanne Stagg-Taylor (2011). Lawyers' Business: Conflicts of Duties Arising From Lawyers' Business Models. Legal Ethics 14 (2):173-192.
    In Australia, since 2004, there has been a move to expand the range of models for legal practice. Lawyers may now incorporate a legal practice, which may have non-legal directors and shareholders. They may also enter into a partnership with a range of non-legal professional partners. This change is happening at the same time that legal practice culture is moving from a professional service model to a business-oriented model. Increased pressures have been thrown into the mix by the global financial (...)
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  49.  12
    Felipe Arias Fogliano de Souza Cunha & Carlos Patricio Samanez (2013). Performance Analysis of Sustainable Investments in the Brazilian Stock Market: A Study About the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):19-36.
    In this article, we studied the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE) of the Brazilian Mercantile, Futures and Stock Exchange (BM&FBOVESPA), with the main objective of analyzing the performance of sustainable investments in the Brazilian stock market, during the period from December 2005 to December 2010. To achieve this aim, we characterized ISE portfolios and we compared its performance with the IBOVESPA (representing the market portfolio) and other BM&FBOVESPA sectoral indices. In the performance comparison, we used level of liquidity, return (...)
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  50.  1
    J. Bickley (1997). The Limits of Language: Ethical Aspects of Strike Action From a New Zealand Perspective. Nursing Ethics 4 (4):303-312.
    Over the last decade, successive New Zealand governments have instituted social, political and economic changes that have fundamentally challenged nurses’ sense of themselves and their position in society. Major upheavals in the health service have occurred as a result of reforms promoting competition and contestability. This paper deals with the impact of one aspect of the reforms, that of the deregulation of the labour market through the Employment Contracts Act 1991. More specifically, the way in which discussions and decisions (...)
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