Search results for 'Marketing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Janet Borgerson & Jonathan Schroeder (2002). Ethical Issues of Global Marketing: Avoiding Bad Faith in Visual Representation. European Journal of Marketing 36 (5/6):570-594.score: 27.0
    This paper examines visual representation from a distinctive, interdisciplinary perspective that draws on ethics, visual studies and critical race theory. Suggests ways to clarify complex issues of representational ethics in marketing communications and marketing representations, suggesting an analysis that makes identity creation central to societal marketing concerns. Analyzes representations of the exotic Other in disparate marketing campaigns, drawing upon tourist promotions, advertisements, and mundane objects in material culture. Moreover, music is an important force in marketing (...)
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  2. Glen I. Spielmans & Peter I. Parry (2010). From Evidence-Based Medicine to Marketing-Based Medicine: Evidence From Internal Industry Documents. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):13-29.score: 24.0
    While much excitement has been generated surrounding evidence-based medicine, internal documents from the pharmaceutical industry suggest that the publicly available evidence base may not accurately represent the underlying data regarding its products. The industry and its associated medical communication firms state that publications in the medical literature primarily serve marketing interests. Suppression and spinning of negative data and ghostwriting have emerged as tools to help manage medical journal publications to best suit product sales, while disease mongering and market segmentation (...)
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  3. Johannes Brinkmann (2002). Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.score: 24.0
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with moral climates, within the above-mentioned (...)
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  4. Paul Lansing & Paul De Vries (2007). Sustainable Tourism: Ethical Alternative or Marketing Ploy? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):77 - 85.score: 24.0
    While tourism is often seen as a welcome source of economic development, conventional mass tourism is associated with numerous negative effects, such as the destruction of ecological systems and loss of cultural heritage. In response to these concerns, a term that has surfaced recently is, sustainable tourism. This article attempts to define sustainable tourism and asks the question of whether this new term is an acceptable criteria or is merely a marketing ploy to attract the morally conscious tourist.
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  5. Khosro S. Jahdi & Gaye Acikdilli (2009). Marketing Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr): Marriage of Convenience or Shotgun Wedding? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):103 - 113.score: 24.0
    This paper aims to examine the role(s) that the various vehicles of marketing communications can play with respect to communicating, publicising and highlighting organisational CSR policies to its various stakeholders. It will further endeavour to evaluate the impact of such communications on an organisation's corporate reputation and brand image. The proliferation of unsubstantiated ethical claims and so-called 'green washing' by some companies has resulted in increasing consumer cynicism and mistrust. This has made the task of communicating with, and more (...)
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  6. Mohammad Saeed, Zafar U. Ahmed & Syeda-Masooda Mukhtar (2001). International Marketing Ethics From an Islamic Perspective: A Value-Maximization Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):127 - 142.score: 24.0
    International marketing practices, embedded in a strong ethical doctrine, can play a vital role in raising the standards of business conduct worldwide, while in no way compromising the quality of services or products offered to customers, or surrendering the profit margins of businesses. Adherence to such ethical practices can help to elevate the standards of behavior and thus of living, of traders and consumers alike. Against this background, this paper endeavors to identify the salient features of the Islamic framework (...)
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  7. M. Joseph Sirgy & Dong-Jin Lee (2008). Well-Being Marketing: An Ethical Business Philosophy for Consumer Goods Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):377 - 403.score: 24.0
    In this article we build on the program of research in well-being marketing by further conceptualizing and refining the conceptual domain of the concept of consumer well-being (CWB). We then argue that well-being marketing is a business philosophy grounded in business ethics. We show how this philosophy is an ethical extension of relationship marketing (stakeholder theory in business ethics) and is superior to transactional marketing (a business philosophy grounded in the principles of consumer sovereignty). Additionally, we (...)
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  8. Naresh K. Malhotra & Gina L. Miller (1998). An Integrated Model for Ethical Decisions in Marketing Research. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (3):263-280.score: 24.0
    While many models of ethical decision-making in marketing have been presented in the literature, no recent attempts have been made to explicitly account for ethical decision-making from a marketing research perspective. We present an ethical framework for marketing research, the various philosophies of ethics, and a few enduring marketing ethical decision-making models, thus laying the foundation for a descriptive model for ethics in marketing research. The authors then develop an integrated model of ethical decision-making that (...)
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  9. Bodo B. Schlegelmilch (1998). Marketing Ethics: An International Perspective. International Thomson Business Press.score: 24.0
    pt. I. Fundamentals of marketing ethics -- pt. II. Ethics in international marketing practice : cases -- pt. III. Readings in international marketing ethics -- pt. IV. Business ethics resources.
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  10. Simon Knox & Colin Gruar (2007). The Application of Stakeholder Theory to Relationship Marketing Strategy Development in a Non-Profit Organization. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2):115 - 135.score: 24.0
    Non-profit (NP) organizations present complex challenges in managing stakeholder relationships, particularly during times of environmental change. This places a premium on knowing which stakeholders really matter if an effective relationship marketing strategy is to be developed. This article presents the successful application of a model, which combines Mitchell’s theory of stakeholder saliency and Coviello’s framework of contemporary marketing practices in a leading NP organization in the U.K. A cooperative enquiry approach is used to explore stakeholder relationships, dominant (...) practices, and to surface differing perceptions about the organization’s marketing strategy. Resolving these differences sets the scene for developing choices in marketing strategy for the future. (shrink)
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  11. John F. Gaski (1999). Does Marketing Ethics Really Have Anything to Say? – A Critical Inventory of the Literature. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (3):315 - 334.score: 24.0
    The material to follow challenges the conceptual uniqueness and contribution of the content of the field of marketing ethics. Based on a comprehensive inspection of the marketing ethics literature, this "review note" (an uncommon genre of academic manuscript – a briefly-presented review highlighting a specific point) concludes that, in terms of pragmatic behavioral guidance as well as conceptual content, marketing ethics has nothing new nor distinctive to offer. Though an initially unexpected conclusion, perhaps, explanation is provided for (...)
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  12. Bert van de Ven (2008). An Ethical Framework for the Marketing of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):339-352.score: 24.0
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop an ethical framework for the marketing of corporate social responsibility. Methods The approach is a conceptual one based on virtue ethics and on the corporate identity literature. Furthermore, empirical research results are used to describe the opportunities and pitfalls of using marketing communication tools in the strategy of building a virtuous corporate brand. Results/conclusions An ethical framework that addresses the paradoxical relation between the consequentialist perspective many proponents of the (...)
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  13. Laurence Ashworth & Clinton Free (2006). Marketing Dataveillance and Digital Privacy: Using Theories of Justice to Understand Consumers' Online Privacy Concerns. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):107 - 123.score: 24.0
    Technology used in online marketing has advanced to a state where collection, enhancement and aggregation of information are instantaneous. This proliferation of customer information focused technology brings with it a host of issues surrounding customer privacy. This article makes two key contributions to the debate concerning digital privacy. First, we use theories of justice to help understand the way consumers conceive of, and react to, privacy concerns. Specifically, it is argued that an important component of consumers’ privacy concerns relates (...)
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  14. Philemon Oyewole (2001). Social Costs of Environmental Justice Associated with the Practice of Green Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):239 - 251.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a conceptual link among green marketing, environmental justice, and industrial ecology. It argues for greater awareness of environmental justice in the practice of green marketing. In contrast with the type of costs commonly discussed in the literature, the paper identified another type of costs, termed "costs with positive results," that may be associated with the presence of environmental justice in green marketing. A research agenda is finally suggested to determine consumers'' awareness of environmental justice, (...)
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  15. Andy Wible (2011). It's All on Sale: Marketing Ethics and the Perpetually Fooled. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):17-21.score: 24.0
    Discussion of marketing deception has mostly focused on two main areas: first are cases that involve the intentional deception of people who tend to have compromised intelligence, such as children or the elderly, and second are cases that involve intentional falsehoods or the withholding of vital information, such as Madoff’s exploits. This article will differ from most in the field by examining marketing practices that are generally truthful, but deceive almost everyone. These practices do not fool just small (...)
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  16. John M. T. Balmer, Shaun M. Powell & Stephen A. Greyser (2011). Explicating Ethical Corporate Marketing. Insights From the BP Deepwater Horizon Catastrophe: The Ethical Brand That Exploded and Then Imploded. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):1-14.score: 24.0
    Ethical corporate marketing—as an organisational-wide philosophy—transcends the domains of corporate social responsibility, business ethics, stakeholder theory and corporate marketing. This being said, ethical corporate marketing represents a logical development vis-a-vis the nascent domain of corporate marketing has an explicit ethical/CSR dimension and extends stakeholder theory by taking account of an institution’s past, present and (prospective) future stakeholders. In our article, we discuss, scrutinise and elaborate the notion of ethical corporate marketing. We argue that an ethical (...)
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  17. Shlomo Sher (2011). A Framework for Assessing Immorally Manipulative Marketing Tactics. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):97-118.score: 24.0
    A longstanding debate exists in both academic literature and popular culture about whether non-informative marketing tactics are manipulative. However, given that we tend to believe that some marketing tactics are manipulative and some are not, the question that marketers, their critics, and consumers need to ask themselves is that of how to actually determine whether any particular marketing tactic is manipulative and whether a given manipulative tactic is, in fact, immoral. This article proposes to operationalize criteria that (...)
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  18. Daniel E. Palmer (2005). Pop-Ups, Cookies, and Spam: Toward a Deeper Analysis of the Ethical Significance of Internet Marketing Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):271 - 280.score: 24.0
    While e-commerce has grown rapidly in recent years, some of the practices associated with certain aspects of marketing on the Internet, such as pop-ups, cookies, and spam, have raised concerns on the part of Internet users. In this paper I examine the nature of these practices and what I take to be the underlying source of this concern. I argue that the ethical issues surrounding these Internet marketing techniques move us beyond the traditional treatment of the ethics of (...)
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  19. Jae-Eun Kim & Kim K. P. Johnson (2013). The Impact of Moral Emotions on Cause-Related Marketing Campaigns: A Cross-Cultural Examination. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):79-90.score: 24.0
    This research was focused on investigating why some consumers might support cause-related marketing campaigns for reasons other than personal benefit by examining the influence of moral emotions and cultural orientation. The authors investigated the extent to which moral emotions operate differently across a cultural variable (US versus Korea) and an individual difference variable (self-construal). A survey method was utilised. Data were collected from a convenience sample of US ( n = 180) and Korean ( n = 191) undergraduates. Moral (...)
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  20. Bodo B. Schlegelmilch & Magdalena Öberseder (2010). Half a Century of Marketing Ethics: Shifting Perspectives and Emerging Trends. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):1 - 19.score: 24.0
    Faced with an ever-growing number of ethical marketing issues and uncertainty about the impact of specialized ethics journals, researchers are struggling to keep abreast of developments in the field. In order to address these challenges, our paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature on marketing ethics over almost 50 years, offers a citation analysis and develops a unique marketing ethics impact factor (MEIF). We contribute to the field in three important ways. First, we present a state-of-the-art (...)
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  21. Kelly D. Martin & Jean L. Johnson (2008). A Framework for Ethical Conformity in Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):103 - 109.score: 24.0
    The extant marketing literature provides little guidance for theory development or practice with regard to questions of ethical conformity and the resulting market response. To begin to bridge this research gap, we advance a theoretical framework of ethical conformity in marketing, appealing to marketing ethics, management strategy, and sociological foundations. We set the stage for our theoretical arguments by considering the role of normative expectations related to marketing practices and behaviors held by societal constituents. Against this (...)
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  22. Elena Fraj-Andrés, Eva Martinez-Salinas & Jorge Matute-Vallejo (2009). A Multidimensional Approach to the Influence of Environmental Marketing and Orientation on the Firm's Organizational Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):263 - 286.score: 24.0
    Since it implies a reduction in the quality and the quantity of the natural resources, environmental degradation is a present day problem that requires immediate solutions. This situation is driving firms to undertake an environmental transformation process with the purpose of reducing the negative externalities that come from their economic activities. Within this context, environmental marketing is an emerging business philosophy by which organizations can address sustainability issues. Moreover, environmental marketing and orientation are seen as valuable strategies to (...)
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  23. David Palmer & Trevor Hedberg (2013). The Ethics of Marketing to Vulnerable Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):403-413.score: 24.0
    An orthodox view in marketing ethics is that it is morally impermissible to market goods to specially vulnerable populations in ways that take advantage of their vulnerabilities. In his signature article “Marketing and the Vulnerable,” Brenkert (Bus Ethics Q Ruffin Ser 1:7–20, 1998) provided the first substantive defense of this position, one which has become a well-established view in marketing ethics. In what follows, we throw new light on marketing to the vulnerable by critically evaluating key (...)
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  24. Chong Ju Choi, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty & Sae Won Kim (2007). Consumer Trust, Social Marketing and Ethics of Welfare Exchange. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):17 - 23.score: 24.0
    The global corporate scandals such as Enron, Worldcom and Global Crossing have raised fundamental issues of business ethics as well as economic, social and anthropological questions concerning the nature of business competition and global capitalism. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of "welfare exchange" to the existing notions of economic, social and anthropological notions of business and exchange in markets and society in the 21st century. Global competition and business success in the 21st century continue (...)
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  25. Jennifer D. Chandler & John L. Graham (2010). Relationship-Oriented Cultures, Corruption, and International Marketing Success. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):251 - 267.score: 24.0
    This study explores the general problems associated with marketing across international markets and focuses specifically on the role of corruption in deterring international marketing success. The authors do this by introducing a broader conceptualization of corruption. The dimensions of corruption and their importance in explaining the exporters’ successes in international markets are developed empirically. Partial Least Squares formative indicators are used in a comprehensive model including consumer resources (wealth and information resources), physical distance (kilometers and time zones), and (...)
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  26. Will Low & Eileen Davenport (2009). Organizational Leadership, Ethics and the Challenges of Marketing Fair and Ethical Trade. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):97 - 108.score: 24.0
    This article critically evaluates current developments in marketing fair trade labelled products and "no sweat" manufactured goods, and argues that both the fair trade and ethical trade movements increasingly rely on strategies for bottom-up change, converting consumers "one cup at a time". This individualistic approach, which we call "shopping for a better world", must, we argue, be augmented by more collectivist approaches to affect transformative change. Specifically, we look at the concept of mission-driven organizations pursuing leadership roles in developing (...)
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  27. Leïla Choukroune (2009). "Harmonious" Norms for Global Marketing the Chinese Way. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):411 - 432.score: 24.0
    Whereas the concept of "socialist rule of law" punctuated political discourse in the late 1990s, the idea of a "socialist harmonious society" is today casting a strange light on Chinese legal reform. Is there a Confucian vision of China's marketing law and practice? To what extent have China's norms for marketing, mainly intellectual property and advertising law, been challenged by the new government policy toward a harmonious society? In the post World Trade Organization accession period, the theoretical framework (...)
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  28. Mary Lyn Stoll (2002). The Ethics of Marketing Good Corporate Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):121 - 129.score: 24.0
    Companies that contribute to charitable organizations rightly hope that their philanthropic work will also be good for the bottom line. Marketers of good corporate conduct must be especially careful, however, to market such conduct in a morally acceptable fashion. Although marketers typically engage in mild deception or take artistic license when marketing goods and services, these sorts of practices are far more morally troublesome when used to market good corporate conduct. I argue that although mild deception is not substantially (...)
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  29. Luís Aráujo, John Finch & Hans Kjellberg (eds.) (2010). Reconnecting Marketing to Markets. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This interdisciplinary book brings together theoretical and empirical contributions from marketing and economic sociologists to analyse and develop novel ...
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  30. Roger Lee Mendoza (2012). A Case Study of Infant Health Promotion and Corporate Marketing of Milk Substitutes. Health Care Analysis 20 (2):196-211.score: 24.0
    The mismatch between the demand for, and supply of, health products has led to the increasing involvement of courts worldwide in health promotion and marketing. This study critically examines the implementation of one country’s Milk Code within the framework of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, and the efficacy of the judicial process in balancing corporate marketing and state regulatory objectives. Drawing upon the Philippine experience with its own Milk Code, it evaluates the capacities of (...)
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  31. Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen, Jon Reast & Nathalie Popering (2012). To Do Well by Doing Good: Improving Corporate Image Through Cause-Related Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):259-274.score: 24.0
    As part of their corporate social responsibility, many organizations practice cause-related marketing, in which organizations donate to a chosen cause with every consumer purchase. The extant literature has identified the importance of the fit between the organization and the nature of the cause in influencing corporate image, as well as the influence of a connection between the cause and consumer preferences on brand attitudes and brand choice. However, prior research has not addressed which cause composition most appeals to consumers (...)
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  32. Alison Watkins & Ronald Paul Hill (2005). The Impact of Personal and Organizational Moral Philosophies on Marketing Exchange Relationships: A Simulation Using the Prisoner's Dilemma Game. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):253 - 265.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of individual and firm moral philosophies on marketing exchange relationships. Personal moral philosophies range from the extreme forms of true altruists and true egoists, along with three hybrids that represent middle ground (i.e., realistic altruists, tit-for-tats, and realistic egoists). Organizational postures are defined as Ethical Paradigm, Unethical Paradigm, and Neutral Paradigm, which result in changes to personal moral philosophies and company and industry performance. The study context is a simulation (...)
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  33. J. Garcia de Madariaga & C. Valor (2007). Stakeholders Management Systems: Empirical Insights From Relationship Marketing and Market Orientation Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):425-439.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the managerial aspects of the relationship with stakeholders, under the assumption that transfer of knowledge is being made from relationship marketing and market orientation perspectives. These marketing tools may prove useful to manage the relationship with other stakeholders, as has been the case with customers. This study focuses on a sample of Spanish companies representing 43% of listed companies with the largest market capitalization. Given that this is the first time that corporate relationship with stakeholders (...)
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  34. Dirk Roep & Johannes Wiskerke (2012). On Governance, Embedding and Marketing: Reflections on the Construction of Alternative Sustainable Food Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):205-221.score: 24.0
    Based on the reconstruction of the development of 14 food supply chain initiatives in 7 European countries, we developed a conceptual framework that demonstrates that the process of increasing the sustainability of food supply chains is rooted in strategic choices regarding governance , embedding, and marketing and in the coordination of these three dimensions that are inextricably interrelated. The framework also shows that when seeking to further develop an initiative (e.g., through scaling up or product diversification) these interrelations need (...)
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  35. Thomas Boysen Anker, Klemens Kappel & Peter Sandøe (2010). The Liberating Power of Commercial Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):519 - 530.score: 24.0
    The aim of this article is to explore the impact of commercial marketing on personal autonomy. Several philosophers argue that marketing conflicts with ideals of autonomy or, at best, is neutral to these ideals. After qualifying our concept of marketing and introducing the distinctions between (i) divergent and convergent marketing and (ii) being autonomous and acting autonomously, we demonstrate the heretofore unnoticed positive impact of marketing on autonomy. Specifically, we argue that (i) convergent marketing (...)
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  36. Michael John Baker & Michael Saren (eds.) (2010). Marketing Theory: A Student Text. Sage.score: 24.0
    Tackling the roots of marketing theory, and unraveling the many influences and debates that have come to define the discipline, this book is a must-have student text.
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  37. M. Joseph Sirgy, Grace B. Yu, Dong-Jin Lee, Shuqin Wei & Ming-Wei Huang (2012). Does Marketing Activity Contribute to a Society's Well-Being? The Role of Economic Efficiency. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):91-102.score: 24.0
    Does the level of marketing activity in a country contribute to societal well-being or quality of life? Does economic efficiency also play a positive role in societal well-being? Does economic efficiency also moderate or mediate the marketing activity effect on societal well-being? Marketing activity refers to the pervasiveness of promotion expenditures and number of retail outlets per capita in a country. Economic efficiency refers to the extent to which the economy is unhampered by corruption, burdensome government regulation, (...)
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  38. M. Joseph Sirgy, J. S. Johar & Tao Gao (2006). Toward a Code of Ethics for Marketing Educators. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):1 - 20.score: 24.0
    This paper builds on previous work by Sirgy, M. J. (1999), Journal of Business Ethics 19, 193–206, dealing with issues of code of conduct of marketing educators. Sirgy developed a discussion document outlining a semblance of what might be construed as a code of ethics for marketing educators. The discussion document was debated and accompanied by three commentaries (Ferrell, O. C.: 1999, Journal of Business Ethics 19, 225–228; Kurtz, D. L.: 1999, Journal of Business Ethics 19, (...)
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  39. Praveen Aggarwal, Rajiv Vaidyanathan & Stephen Castleberry (2012). Managerial and Public Attitudes Toward Ethics in Marketing Research. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):463-481.score: 24.0
    This research updates and significantly extends Akaah and Riordon’s (J Market Res 26:112–120, 1989 ) evaluation of ethical perceptions of marketing research misconduct among marketing research professionals. In addition to examining changes in perceptions toward key marketing research practices over time, we assess professionals’ judgments on the ethicality, importance, and occurrence of a variety of new marketing research ethics situations in both online and offline contexts. In a second study, we assess ethical judgments of the public (...)
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  40. Leslie J. Vermillion, Walfried M. Lassar & Robert D. Winsor (2002). The Hunt–Vitell General Theoryof Marketing Ethics: Can It Enhance Our Understanding of Principal-Agent Relationships in Channels of Distribution? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (3):267 - 285.score: 24.0
    This paper advances the Hunt–Vitell General Theory of Marketing Ethics as a framework for enriching current understanding of both long-term marketing relationships in general, and principal-agent associations specifically. Under economic models of agency theory, manufacturer-distributor relationships are conceptualized as principal-agent associations where both parties are assumed be motivated exclusively by short-term financial self-interest within the logical constraints of zero-sum game conditions. As a general model of ethical decision making and behavior in marketing, the Hunt–Vitell theory illustrates how (...)
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  41. Gordon Liu (2013). Impacts of Instrumental Versus Relational Centered Logic on Cause-Related Marketing Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):243-263.score: 24.0
    The purpose of cause-related marketing is to capitalise on a firm’s social engagement initiatives to achieve a positive return on a firm’s social investment. This article discusses two strategic perspectives of cause-related marketing and their impact on a firm’s decision-making regarding campaign development. The instrumental dominant logic of cause-related marketing focuses on attracting customers’ attention in order to generate sales. The relational dominant logic of cause-related marketing focuses on building relationships with the target stakeholders through the (...)
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  42. Daulatram B. Lund (2008). Gender Differences in Ethics Judgment of Marketing Professionals in the United States. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):501 - 515.score: 24.0
    This empirical investigation reexamines the impact of gender on ethics judgment of marketing professionals in a cross-section of firms in the United States. In the study, gender differences in ethics judgment focus on decisions in the context of marketing-mix elements (product, promotion, pricing, and distribution). The results of statistical analyses indicate that men and women marketing professionals differ significantly in their ethics judgment. Overall, female marketing professionals evinced significantly higher ethics judgment than their male counterparts. Given (...)
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  43. Pierre Guillet de Monthoux (2004). The Art Firm: Aesthetic Management and Metaphysical Marketing. Stanford Business Books.score: 24.0
    The Art Firm explores the seemingly unorthodox alliance of the arts, management, and marketing. Art firms—as avant-garde enterprises and arts corporations—have existed for at least two hundred years, using texts, images, and other types of art to create corporate wealth. This book investigates how to apply the methods artists use in creating value to the methods more traditional managers use in running their businesses. Guillet de Monthoux offers a crash course in aesthetics from Kant to Gadamer, showing how aesthetic (...)
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  44. Eleanor O.’Higgins & Bairbre Kelleher (2005). Comparative Perspectives on the Ethical Orientations of Human Resources, Marketing and Finance Functional Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):275 - 288.score: 24.0
    The human resources profession emphasizes the personal and interpersonal aspects of work, that make it conscious of complex ethical issues in relationships in the workplace, while finance specialists are conversant with routine compliance with regulations. Marketing professionals are under pressure to produce revenue results. Thus, this research hypothesized that human resources managers would be more disapproving of unethical conduct than both finance and marketing functional managers, and that finance managers would be more disapproving than marketing managers. When (...)
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  45. Jason Pridmore (2010). Reflexive Marketing: The Cultural Circuit of Loyalty Programs. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):565-581.score: 24.0
    The amount of personal data now collected through contemporary marketing practices is indicative of the shifting landscape of contemporary capitalism. Loyalty programs can be seen as one exemplar of this, using the ‘add-ons’ of ‘points’ and ‘miles’ to entice consumers into divulging a range of personal information. These consumers are subject to surveillance practices that have digitally identified them as significant in the eyes of a corporation, yet they are also part of a feedback loop subject to ongoing analysis. (...)
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  46. Sebnem Burnaz, M. G. Serap Atakan, Y. Ilker Topcu & Anusorn Singhapakdi (2009). An Exploratory Cross-Cultural Analysis of Marketing Ethics: The Case of Turkish, Thai, and American Businesspeople. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):371 - 382.score: 24.0
    This study compares the ethical decisionmaking processes of Turkish, Thai, and American businesspeople, considering perceived moral intensity (PMI), corporate ethical values (CEV), and perceived importance of ethics (PIE). PMI describes the ethical decision making at the individual level, CEV assesses the influences of the organization's ethical culture on the decisions of the individual, and PIE reveals what the businesspeople believe about the relationships among business, ethics, and long-run profitability. The survey respondents are professional marketers and businesspeople currently enrolled in or (...)
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  47. Georges Enderle & Qibin Niu (2012). Discerning Ethical Challenges for Marketing in China. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):143 - 162.score: 24.0
    Abstract Along with China’s stunning economic growth, marketing has become a multi-billion dollar business, afflicted by a plethora of marketing scandals. However, little attention has been paid, until now, to a more systematic approach to marketing ethics in China. This essay attempts to provide a broad and timely, but far from complete, view on marketing issues in China. It uses four ethical guidelines which capture the fundamental features particularly relevant to marketing activities: practicing honest communication; (...)
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  48. Eduardo Meinberg de Albuquerque Maranhão Filho (2012). Marketing de Guerra Santa”: da oferta e atendimento de demandas religiosas à conquista de fiéis-consumidores (Holy War's Marketing: supply and meeting of religious demands to the conquest of the faithful-consumers).DOI:10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n25p201. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (25):201-232.score: 24.0
    O artigo apresenta apontamentos sobre “marketing de guerra santa ” , o planejamento estratégico de gerenciamento de mercado religioso aplicado por algumas das igrejas cristãs da contemporaneidade. Vale-se de reflexões a partir de observação participante e de consulta a bibliografia especializada. Apontam-se algumas das formas com as quais essas igrejas se midiatizam e se inserem num contexto de espetacularização e mercadorização próprios da sociedade do tempo presente e imediato. O mercado religioso no qual se inserem as agências que praticam (...)
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  49. Gordon Liu, Catherine Liston-Heyes & Wai-Wai Ko (2010). Employee Participation in Cause-Related Marketing Strategies: A Study of Management Perceptions From British Consumer Service Industries. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):195 - 210.score: 24.0
    The purpose of cause-related marketing (CRM) is to publicise and capitalise on a firm's corporate social performance (CSP) by enhancing its legitimacy in the eyes of its stakeholders. This study focuses on the firm's internal stakeholders - i.e. its employees - and the extent of their involvement in the selection of social campaigns. Whilst the difficulties of managing a firm that has lost or damaged its legitimacy in the eyes of its employees are well known, little is understood about (...)
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  50. Bryn Williams-Jones & Vural Ozdemir (2008). Challenges for Corporate Ethics in Marketing Genetic Tests. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (1):33 - 44.score: 24.0
    Public discussions of ethical issues related to the biotechnology industry tend to treat “biotechnology” as a single, undifferentiated technology. Similarly, the pros and cons associated with this entire sector tend to get lumped together, such that individuals and groups often situate themselves as either “pro-” or “anti-” biotechnology as a whole. But different biotechnologies and their particular application context pose very different challenges for ethical corporate decision-making. Even within a single product category, different specialty products can pose strikingly different ethical (...)
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