6 found
Sort by:
  1. Markus L. A. Heinimaa (2005). Past Personal Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (1):25-26.
  2. Markus Heinimaa (2003). Incomprehensibility. In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. 217--30.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Markus Heinimaa (2002). Incomprehensibility: The Role of the Concept in DSM-IV Definition of Schizophrenic Delusions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):291-295.
    In this paper the role of incomprehensibility in the conceptualization of the DSM-IV definition of delusion is discussed. According to the analysis, the conceptual dependence of DSM-IV definition of delusion on incomprehensibility is manifested in several ways and infested with ambiguity. Definition of bizarre delusions is contradictory and gives room for two incompatible readings. Also the definition of delusion manifests internal inconsistencies and its tendency to account for delusions in terms of misinterpretation is bound to miss the content of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Markus Heinimaa (2000). Ambiguities in the Psychiatric Use of the Concepts of the Person: An Analysis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (2):125-136.
  5. Markus L. A. Heinimaa (2000). On the Grammar of ``Psychosis''. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):39-46.
    This study in the philosophy of psychiatrydeals with the concept `psychosis'. Methodologicallyit follows Wittgenstein's proposal to `dissolve'philosophical problems by studying the actual use ofthe relevant concepts. Philosophical problemsconcerning both identification of psychosis and themeaning of this concept are pointed out. The logicaldependencies between `psychosis' and `understanding'and between `understanding' and the concept ofperson are demonstrated. Studying theinterdependence of these concepts in the light ofthe actual uses of `madness' shows how the use of`psychosis' implies a radical loss of understanding.The status and legitimacy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Markus La Heinimaa (2000). Broken Language and Broken Lives: A Response to the Commentary. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (2):139-140.