Search results for 'Marlos Goes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Toby Svoboda, Klaus Keller, Marlos Goes & Nancy Tuana (2011). Sulfate Aerosol Geoengineering: The Question of Justice. Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (3):157-180.
    Some authors have called for increased research on various forms of geoengineering as a means to address global climate change. This paper focuses on the question of whether a particular form of geoengineering, namely deploying sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere to counteract some of the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations, would be a just response to climate change. In particular, we examine problems sulfate aerosol geoengineering (SAG) faces in meeting the requirements of distributive, intergenerational, and procedural justice. (...)
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  2.  15
    Matteo Colombo, Jun Lai & Vincenzo Crupi, Sleeping Beauty Goes to the Lab: The Psychology of Self-Locating Evidence.
    The <span class='Hi'>Sleeping</span> <span class='Hi'>Beauty</span> Problem is a challenging puzzle in probabilistic reasoning, which has attracted enormous attention and still fosters ongoing debate. The problem goes as follows: Suppose that some researchers are going to put you to sleep. During the two days that your sleep will last, they will briefly wake you up either once or twice, depending on the toss of a fair coin. After each waking, they will put you back to sleep with a drug that (...)
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  3.  92
    David L. Gosling (2011). Darwin and the Hindu Tradition: “Does What Goes Around Come Around?”. Zygon 46 (2):345-369.
    Abstract. The introduction of English as the medium of instruction for higher education in India in 1835 created a ferment in society and in the religious beliefs of educated Indians—Hindus, Muslims, and, later, Christians. There was a Hindu renaissance characterized by the emergence of reform movements led by charismatic figures who fastened upon aspects of Western thought, especially science, now available in English. The publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859 was readily assimilated by educated Hindus, and (...)
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  4.  10
    Darian Meacham (2013). What Goes Without Saying: Husserl's Concept of Style. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):3-26.
    The idea of “style” emerges at several important points throughout Husserl’s oeuvre: in the second part of the Crisis of the European Sciences, the lectures on intersubjectivity published in Husserliana XV, and in the analyses of transcendental character and intersubjectivity in the second book of the Ideas. This paper argues that the idea of style, often overlooked, is in fact central to understanding Husserl’s conception of the person and intersubjective relations, its role in the latter captured in his odd turn (...)
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  5.  39
    D. Macbeth (2012). Seeing How It Goes: Paper-and-Pencil Reasoning in Mathematical Practice. Philosophia Mathematica 20 (1):58-85.
    Throughout its long history, mathematics has involved the use ofsystems of written signs, most notably, diagrams in Euclidean geometry and formulae in the symbolic language of arithmetic and algebra in the mathematics of Descartes, Euler, and others. Such systems of signs, I argue, enable one to embody chains of mathematical reasoning. I then show that, properly understood, Frege’s Begriffsschrift or concept-script similarly enables one to write mathematical reasoning. Much as a demonstration in Euclid or in early modern algebra does, a (...)
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  6.  44
    William Fish & Cynthia Macdonald (2009). The Identity Theory of Truth and the Realm of Reference: Where Dodd Goes Wrong. Analysis 69 (2):297-304.
    In ‘On McDowell's identity conception of truth’ , we suggested that McDowell's Identity Theory, according to which a proposition is true if and only if it is identical with a fact, is only fully understood when we realize that there are two identity claims involved. The first is that, when one thinks truly, the content of a whole thought is identical with a Tractarian Tatsachen – a complex fact constituted by simple Sachverhalte – and the second is that these simple (...)
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  7. Chris Freeman & Francisco Louçã (2002). As Time Goes By: From the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolutuion. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Internet and mobile telephones have made everyone more aware than ever of the computer revolution and its effects on the economy and society. As Time Goes By puts this revolution in the perspective of previous waves of technical change: steam-powered mechanization, electrification, and motorization. It argues for a theory of reasoned economic history which assigns a central place to these successive technological revolutions.
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  8.  17
    Christopher Falzon (2007). Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.
    Philosophy Goes to the Movies is a new kind of introduction to philosophy that makes use of the movies to explore philosophical ideas and positions. From art-house movies like Cinema Paradiso to Hollywood blockbusters like The Matrix, the movies we have grown up with provide us with a world of memorable images, events and situations that can be used to illustrate, illuminate and provoke philosophical thought.
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  9.  58
    Adam Morton (2003). Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):332-334.
    review of Falzon *Philosophy goes to the Movies*.
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  10.  2
    Christopher Falzon (2002). Philosophy Goes to the Movies. Routledge.
    Philosophy goes to the Movies is a new kind of introduction to philosophy that makes use of movies including The Matrix , Antz , Total Recall and Cinema Paradiso , to explore philosophical ideas. Topics covered include: *the theory of knowledge *the self and personal Identity *moral philosophy *social and political philosophy *philosophy of science and technology *critical thinking. Ideal for the beginner, this book guides the student through philosophy using lively and illuminating cinematic examples. It will also appeal (...)
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  11. Chris Freeman & Francisco Louçã (2001). As Time Goes By: From the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolutuion. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'This is a very good and important book that is must reading for anyone interested in evolutionary economics and/or the relationship between history and economics. In addition, you get a very well documented and argued interpretation of long run capitalist development from the industrial revolution to the present that will be a standard reference... a first rate contribution to the discussion of how evolutionary economics should develop.' -Journal of Evolutionary Economics 'The book offers numerous insights into particular aspects of (...)
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  12.  32
    Kyle Swan (2004). Copping Out on the Anything-Goes Objection. In Philosophia Christi. 289-294.
    I suggest a strategy for defending the Divine Command Theory of morality against the familiar “anything goes” objection. The objection is that this theory of morality has counter-intuitive moral implications. I argue that the objection fails to notice the difference between a first-order expression of a moral proposition and a second-order metaethical account of what justifies moral standards. The objection treats the theory as if it were the former, when it is actually the latter.
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  13.  1
    Howard Hodgens (2014). Betting on Famine: Why the World Still Goes Hungry [Book Review]. Australian Humanist, The 115:22.
    Hodgens, Howard Review of: Betting on famine: Why the world still goes hungry, by Jean Ziegler, The New Press $34.99.
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  14. Noam Chomsky, "What We Say Goes": The Middle East in the New World Order.
    A standard response is that we live in "an era full of promise," "one of those rare transforming moments in history". The United States "has a new credibility," the President announced, and dictators and tyrants everywhere know " that what we say goes." George Bush is "at the height of his powers" and "has made very clear that he wants to breathe light into that hypothetical creature, the Middle East peace process". So things are looking up.
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  15. Christopher Falzon (2014). Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.
    Now emulated in several competing publications, but still unsurpassed in clarity and insight, _Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy, Third Edition_ builds on the approach that made the two earlier editions so successful. Drawing on many popular and some lesser known films from around the world, Christopher Falzon introduces students to key areas in philosophy, like: • Ethics • Social and Political Philosophy • The Theory of Knowledge • The Self and Personal Identity • Critical Thinking (...)
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  16. Christopher Falzon (2014). Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.
    Now emulated in several competing publications, but still unsurpassed in clarity and insight, _Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy, Third Edition_ builds on the approach that made the two earlier editions so successful. Drawing on many popular and some lesser known films from around the world, Christopher Falzon introduces students to key areas in philosophy, like: • Ethics • Social and Political Philosophy • The Theory of Knowledge • The Self and Personal Identity • Critical Thinking (...)
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  17. Christopher Falzon (2012). Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.
    Drawing on a wide range of films from around the world, and the ideas of a diverse selection of thinkers from Plato and Descartes to Marcuse and Foucault, _Philosophy Goes to the Movies_ introduces and discusses central areas of philosophical concern, including: *the theory of knowledge *the self and personal identity *ethics *social and political philosophy *critical thinking Ideal for beginners, this book guides the reader through philosophy using lively and illuminating cinematic examples including _A Clockwork Orange_, _Mulholland Drive_, (...)
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  18. J. Velleman (2006). “So It Goes”. Studies in Social Justice:1-23.
    Buddhists believe that the existence of an enduring self is an illusion and that this illusion is the root of the suffering inherent in the human condition. I want to explore whether this particular Buddhist thought can be understood in terms familiar to analytic philosophy. How might the illusion of an enduring self lie at the root of human suffering? After explaining the sense in which the enduring self is indeed an illusion, I argue that this illusion goes hand-in-hand (...)
     
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  19.  9
    James B. Avey, Michael E. Palanski & Fred O. Walumbwa (2011). When Leadership Goes Unnoticed: The Moderating Role of Follower Self-Esteem on the Relationship Between Ethical Leadership and Follower Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):573 - 582.
    The authors examined the effects of ethical leadership on follower organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and deviant behavior. Drawing upon research related to the behavioral plasticity hypothesis, the authors examined a moderating role of follower self-esteem in these relationships. Results from a field study revealed that ethical leadership is positively related to follower OCB and negatively related to deviance. We found that these relationships are moderated by followers' self-esteem, such that the relationships between ethical leadership and OCB as well (...)
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  20. David Ripley (2015). Anything Goes. Topoi 34 (1):25-36.
    This paper consider Prior's connective Tonk from a particular bilateralist perspective. I show that there is a natural perspective from which we can see Tonk and its ilk as perfectly well-defined pieces of vocabulary; there is no need for restrictions to bar things like Tonk.
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  21. Timothy Chappell (2009). Infinity Goes Up on Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless? European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):30-44.
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  22. Patricia Crifo & Vanina D. Forget (2013). Think Global, Invest Responsible: Why the Private Equity Industry Goes Green. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):21-48.
    The growth of socially responsible investment (SRI) on public financial markets has drawn considerable academic attention over the last decade. Discarding from the previous literature, this article sets up to analyze the Private Equity channel, which is shown to have the potentiality to foster sustainable practices in unlisted companies. The fast integration of the environmental, social and governance issues by mainstream Private Equity investors is unveiled and appears to have benefited from the maturation of SRI on public financial markets (...)
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  23.  36
    Matthew Lipman (1988). Philosophy Goes to School. Temple University Press.
    Author note: Matthew Lipman, Professor of Philosophy at Montclair State College and Director of the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children, is ...
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  24. Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza (2007). Kant Goes Skydiving : Understanding the Extreme by Way of the Sublime. In M. J. McNamee (ed.), Philosophy, Risk, and Adventure Sports. London ;Routledge
     
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  25.  9
    Brian Wynne (2011). Lab Work Goes Social, and Vice Versa: Strategising Public Engagement Processes. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):791-800.
    Midstream modulation is a form of public engagement with science which benefits from strategic application of science and technology studies (STS) insights accumulated over nearly 20 years. These have been developed from STS researchers’ involvement in practical engagement processes and research with scientists, science funders, policy and other public stakeholders. The strategic aim of this specific method, to develop what is termed second-order reflexivity amongst scientist-technologists, builds upon and advances earlier more general STS work. However this method is focused and (...)
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  26. David Velleman, So It Goes.
    Derek Parfit finally meets the Buddha -- on Tralfamadore! This paper is also archived at SSRN.
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  27.  44
    Marianne Grove Ditlevsen & Peter Kastberg (2007). When Corporate Communication Goes Public-Communication Policies in Public Communication. Hermes 38:11-40.
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  28.  33
    Giuliana A. L. Mazzoni, Elizabeth F. Loftus & Irving Kirsch (2001). Changing Beliefs About Implausible Autobiographical Events: A Little Plausibility Goes a Long Way. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7 (1):51.
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  29.  91
    Hans-Johann Glock (2009). Concepts: Where Subjectivism Goes Wrong. Philosophy 84 (1):5-29.
    The debate about concepts has always been shaped by a contrast between subjectivism, which treats them as phenomena in the mind or head of individuals, and objectivism, which insists that they exist independently of individual minds. The most prominent contemporary version of subjectivism is Fodor's RTM. The Fregean charge against subjectivism is that it cannot do justice to the fact that different individuals can share the same concepts. Proponents of RTM have accepted shareability as a 'non-negotiable constraint'. At the same (...)
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  30.  4
    Keith Stenning & Michiel Lambalgen (2004). A Little Logic Goes a Long Way: Basing Experiment on Semantic Theory in the Cognitive Science of Conditional Reasoning. Cognitive Science 28 (4):481-529.
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  31.  46
    Maarten Boudry & Bert Leuridan (2011). Where the Design Argument Goes Wrong: Auxiliary Assumptions and Unification. Philosophy of Science 78 (4):558-578.
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  32.  1
    Gerald P. Koocher (forthcoming). Niki Goes to School: Autonomy, Control, and Psychiatric Hospitalization. Ethics and Behavior.
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  33.  11
    Carl Elliott (2004). Pharma Goes to the Laundry: Public Relations and the Business of Medical Education. Hastings Center Report 34 (5):18.
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  34. Floyd Merrell (forthcoming). As Signs Grow, so Life Goes. Biosemiotics. A Semiotic Web 1991.
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  35.  2
    Brooke Blevins, Karon LeCompte & Sunny Wells (2014). Citizenship Education Goes Digital. Journal of Social Studies Research 38 (1):33-44.
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  36.  96
    Carl Hoefer (1998). Absolute Versus Relational Spacetime: For Better or Worse, the Debate Goes On. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):451-467.
    The traditional absolutist-relationist debate is still clearly formulable in the context of General Relativity Theory (GTR), despite the important differences between Einstein's theory and the earlier context of Newtonian physics. This paper answers recent arguments by Robert Rynasiewicz against the significance of the debate in the GTR context. In his (1996) (‘Absolute vs. Relational Spacetime: An Outmoded Debate?’), Rynasiewicz argues that already in the late nineteenth century, and even more so in the context of General Relativity theory, the terms of (...)
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  37.  10
    Hans Johann Glock, Concepts: Where Subjectivism Goes Wrong.
    The debate about concepts has always been shaped by a contrast between subjectivism, which treats them as phenomena in the mind or head of individuals, and objectivism, which insists that they exist independently of individual minds. The most prominent contemporary version of subjectivism is Fodor's RTM. The Fregean charge against subjectivism is that it cannot do justice to the fact that different individuals can share the same concepts. Proponents of RTM have accepted shareability as a ‘non-negotiable constraint’. At the same (...)
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  38.  46
    Amy J. Fitzgerald (2009). What Goes Into Pet Food Goes Public. Society and Animals 17 (4):361-362.
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  39.  57
    Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. III. Schwinger Goes to Berkeley. Foundations of Physics 29 (6):931-966.
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger is explored. After a brilliant beginning at Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D., Schwinger went to work with J. Robert Oppenheimer in Berkeley. His stay, work, and interactions with Oppenheimer are discussed.
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  40.  32
    Joseph G. Moore (2010). Artistic Expression Goes Green. Acta Analytica 25 (1):89-103.
    The paper is a critical discussion of the rich and insightful final chapter of Mitchell Green’s Self-Expression . There, Green seeks to elucidate the compelling, but inchoate intuition that when we’re fully and most expertly expressing ourselves, we can ‘push out’ from within not just our inner representations, but also the ways that we feel. I question, first, whether this type of ‘qualitative expression’ is really distinct from the other expressive forms that Green explores, and also whether it’s genuinely ‘expressive’. (...)
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  41.  2
    Paul J. Smith (2015). Folly Goes French. Erasmus Studies 35 (1):35-60.
    _ Source: _Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 35 - 60 The early-modern French translations of Erasmus’ Praise of Folly show an astonishing adaptability to its ever changing readerships. Much attention has been paid recently to the two sixteenth-century translations and their intended readers—royal and bourgeois respectively. The three French translations of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are less known but all the more intriguing. In 1642 Folly addresses herself to the French pre-classicist readers, adepts of Richelieu’s new Académie Française—although her (...)
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  42.  1
    Stephen Thierman (2010). Apparatuses of Animality: Foucault Goes to a Slaughterhouse. Foucault Studies 9:89-110.
    The work of Michel Foucault is not often considered in animal ethics discussions, but I believe that many of his insights can be fruitfully extended into this area of philosophical inquiry. In this paper, I present the slaughterhouse as a technology of power that is complicit in the domination and objectification of both human and nonhuman animal subjects. I begin by arguing that Foucault’s notion of an “apparatus” is a useful methodological tool for thinking about the constellation of spaces and (...)
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  43.  48
    Cressida J. Heyes (2006). Foucault Goes to Weight Watchers. Hypatia 21 (2):126-149.
    : This article argues that commercial weight-loss organizations appropriate and debase the askeses—practices of care of the self—that Michel Foucault theorized, increasing members' capacities at the same time as they encourage participation in ever-tightening webs of power. Weight Watchers, for example, claims to promote self-knowledge, cultivate new capacities and pleasures, foster self-care in face of gendered exploitation, and encourage wisdom and flexibility. The hupomnemata of these organizations thus use asketic language to conceal their implication in normalization.
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  44.  6
    Keith Stenning & Michiel van Lambalgen (2004). A Little Logic Goes a Long Way: Basing Experiment on Semantic Theory in the Cognitive Science of Conditional Reasoning. Cognitive Science 28 (4):481-529.
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  45.  6
    Carl Lemmens (2004). Pharma Goes to the Laundry: Public Relations and the Business of Medical Education. Hastings Center Report 34 (5):18-23.
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  46.  22
    Christian Dahlman (2011). When Conventionalism Goes Too Far. Ratio Juris 24 (3):335-346.
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  47.  68
    Joseph Almog (1981). Dthis and Dthat: Indexicality Goes Beyond That. Philosophical Studies 39 (4):347 - 381.
  48.  31
    Robert E. Goodin (2006). Volenti Goes to Market. Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):53 - 74.
    If free markets consist in nothing more than “capitalist acts between consenting adults,” and if in the old legal maxim “volenti non fit injuria,” then it seems to follow that free markets do no wrongs. But that defense of free markets wrenches the “volenti” maxim out of context. In common law adjudication of disputes between two parties, it is perfectly appropriate to cast standards of “volenti” narrowly, and largely ignore “duress via third parties” (wrongs done to or by others who (...)
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  49.  84
    Colin Lyas (1983). Anything Goes: The Intentional Fallacy Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (4):291-305.
  50.  14
    Peter Schuster (2007). A Beginning of the End of the Holism Versus Reductionism Debate?: Molecular Biology Goes Cellular and Organismic. Complexity 13 (1):10-13.
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