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  1. Irina Cojuharenco, Garriy Shteynberg, Michele Gelfand & Marshall Schminke (2012). Self-Construal and Unethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):447-461.
    We suggest that understanding unethical behavior in organizations involves understanding how people view themselves and their relationships with others, a concept known as self-construal. Across multiple studies, employing both field and laboratory settings, we examine the impact of three dimensions of self-construal (independent, relational, and collective) on unethical behavior. Our results show that higher levels of relational self-construal relate negatively to unethical behavior. We also find that differences in levels of relational self for men and women mediate gender differences in (...)
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  2. Scott R. Colwell, Michael J. Zyphur & Marshall Schminke (2011). When Does Ethical Code Enforcement Matter in the Inter-Organizational Context? The Moderating Role of Switching Costs. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):47-58.
    Drawing on signaling theory, we suggest that a supplier’s enforcement of ethical codes sends signals about the supplier that affect a buyer’s decision to continue their commitment to the supplier. We then draw on side-bet theory to hypothesize how switching costs influence the importance of a supplier’s enforcement of ethical codes in predicting a buyer’s continuance commitment to a supplier. We empirically test our model with data from 158 purchasing managers across three manufacturing industries. Results confirm the connection between ethical (...)
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  3. David De Cremer, David M. Mayer & Marshall Schminke (2010). Guest Editors' Introduction. On Understanding Ethical Behavior and Decision Making: A Behavioral Ethics Approach. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (1).
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  4. David De Cremer, David M. Mayer & Marshall Schminke (2010). Guest Editors' Introduction On Understanding Ethical Behavior and Decision Making. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (1):1-6.
    Behavioral ethics is an emerging field that takes an empirical, social scientific approach to the study of business ethics. In this special issue, we include six articles that fall within the domain of behavioral ethics and that focus on three themes—moral awareness, ethical decision making, and reactions to unethical behavior. Each of the articles sheds additional light on the specific issues addressed. However, we hope this special issue will have an impact beyond that of the new insights offered in these (...)
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  5. David De Cremer, David M. Mayer & Marshall Schminke (2010). Special Issue-Behavioral Ethics: A New Empirical Perspective on Business Ethics Research-Guest Editors' Introduction-on Understanding Ethical Behavior and Decision Making: A Behavioral Ethics Approach. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (1):1.
     
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  6. Marshall Schminke (ed.) (2010). Managerial Ethics: Managing the Psychology of Morality. Routledge.
    This book will combine management theory with ethical theory on a chapter by chapter, topic by topic basis.
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  7. Marshall Schminke & Manuela Priesemuth (2010). Management and Ethics: Revisiting Distant Neighbors. In , Managerial Ethics: Managing the Psychology of Morality. Routledge. 1.
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  8. Marshall Schminke, Alex Vestal & James Caldwell (2010). A Review and Assessment of Ethical Decision Making Models: Is a Garbage Can Approach the Answer? In , Managerial Ethics: Managing the Psychology of Morality. Routledge. 271.
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  9. G. Stoney Alder, Marshall Schminke, Terry W. Noel & Maribeth Kuenzi (2008). Employee Reactions to Internet Monitoring: The Moderating Role of Ethical Orientation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):481 - 498.
    Research has demonstrated that employee reactions to monitoring systems depend on both the characteristics of the monitoring system and how it is implemented. However, little is known about the role individual differences may play in this process. This study proposes that individuals have generalized attitudes toward organizational control and monitoring activities. We examined this argument by assessing the relationship between employees’ baseline attitudes toward a set of monitoring and control techniques that span the employment relationship. We further explore the effects (...)
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  10. Maureen L. Ambrose, Anke Arnaud & Marshall Schminke (2008). Individual Moral Development and Ethical Climate: The Influence of Person–Organization Fit on Job Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):323 - 333.
    This research examines how the fit between employees moral development and the ethical work climate of their organization affects employee attitudes. Person-organization fit was assessed by matching individuals' level of cognitive moral development with the ethical climate of their organization. The influence of P-O fit on employee attitudes was assessed using a sample of 304 individuals from 73 organizations. In general, the findings support our predictions that fit between personal and organizational ethics is related to higher levels of commitment and (...)
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  11. G. Stoney Alder, Marshall Schminke & Terry W. Noel (2007). The Impact of Individual Ethics on Reactions to Potentially Invasive HR Practices. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (2):201 - 214.
    In recent years, the practices of work organizations have raised increasing concerns regarding individual privacy at work. It is clear that people expect and value privacy in their personal lives. However, the extent to which privacy perceptions influence individuals’ work attitudes is less clear. Research has explored the extent to which employee perceptions of privacy derive from characteristics of the programs themselves. However, there is a paucity of research that examines how the characteristics of the individual employee may influence perceptions (...)
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  12. Donald Neubaum, Marie Mitchell & Marshall Schminke (2004). Firm Newness, Entrepreneurial Orientation, and Ethical Climate. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):335 - 347.
    Faced with the liability of newness, a scarcity of resources, and concerns of survival, new firms frequently encounter difficult ethical decisions and might be pressured to make choices that run counter to the tenets of more developed ethical and moral reasoning. This study explores the impact of newness and entrepreneurial orientation on the ethical climate of firms. Data collected from 304 individuals across 37 firms indicated that firm newness was more strongly related to ethical climate than was an entrepreneurial orientation. (...)
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  13. Mark A. Seabright & Marshall Schminke (2002). Immoral Imagination and Revenge in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):19 - 31.
    Malevolence and cruelty are commonly attributed to a failure of moral reasoning or a lack of moral imagination. We present the contrasting viewpoint – immorality as an active, creative, or resourceful act. More specifically, we develop the concept of "immoral imagination" (Jacobs, 1991) and explore how it can enter into Rest's (1986) four processes of decision making: sensitivity, judgment, intention, and implementation. The literature on revenge and workplace deviance illustrates these processes.
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  14. Marshall Schminke (2001). Considering the Business in Business Ethics: An Exploratory Study of the Influence of Organizational Size and Structure on Individual Ethical Predispositions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):375 - 390.
    This paper explores the relationship between organizational size, structure and the strength of organization members'' ethical predispositions. It is hypothesized that individuals in smaller, more flexible, organic organizations will display stronger ethical predispositions. Survey results from 209 individuals across eleven organizations indicate that contrary to expectations, larger, more rigid, mechanistic structures were associated with higher levels of ethical formalism and utilitarianism. Implications of these findings are discussed.
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  15. Marshall Schminke & Deborah Wells (1999). Group Processes and Performance and Their Effects on Individuals' Ethical Frameworks. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):367 - 381.
    This paper explores the influence of group context on the ethical predispositions of group members. Results indicate that groups exert a powerful influence on individuals' ethical frameworks, and that the patterns of these influences differ depending on the type of ethical framework involved. Individuals' ethical utilitarianism was affected by both leadership style and group cohesiveness. Ethical formalism was most affected by the leadership style in the group.
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  16. Marshall Schminke (ed.) (1998). Managerial Ethics: Moral Management of People and Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum Assocs..
    This volumes presents better ways to integrate research on management and ethics. The need for better communication and meaningful ways to change the pattern of thinking in complex organizational settings is discussed and explored.
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  17. Marshall Schminke (1998). The Magic Punchbowl: A Nonrational Model of Ethical Management. In , Managerial Ethics: Moral Management of People and Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum Assocs.. 197--214.
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  18. Marshall Schminke (1997). Gender Differences in Ethical Frameworks and Evaluation of Others' Choices in Ethical Dilemmas. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):55-65.
    This paper examines the relationship between gender and ethical decision models employed by managers. Subjects completed a survey that measured the extent to which they focused on actions or the outcomes of those actions in determining whether a behavior was ethical or not. The study also examined subjects' reactions to other managers' responses to ethical dilemmas. Results suggest that men and women do not differ in their underlying ethical models, that they do differ in the way in which they evaluate (...)
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  19. Marshall Schminke & Maureen L. Ambrose (1997). Asymmetric Perceptions of Ethical Frameworks of Men and Women in Business and Nonbusiness Settings. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):719-729.
    This paper examines the relationship between individuals' gender and their ethical decision models. The study seeks to identify asymmetries in men's and women's approaches to ethical decision making and differences in their perceptions of how same-sex and other-sex managers would likely act in business and nonbusiness situations that present an ethical dilemma. Results indicate that the models employed by men and women differ in both business and nonbusiness settings, that both sexes report changing models when leaving business settings, and that (...)
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  20. Marshall Schminke (1991). Ethics in Declining Organizations. Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (3):235-248.
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