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  1. Martha Wagner Alibali & Kenneth R. Koedinger (1999). The Developmental Progression From Implicit to Explicit Knowledge: A Computational Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):755-756.
    Dienes & Perner (D&P) argue that nondeclarative knowledge can take multiple forms. We provide empirical support for this from two related lines of research about the development of mathematical reasoning. We then describe how different forms of procedural and declarative knowledge can be effectively modeled in Anderson's ACT-R theory, contrasting this computational approach with D&P's logical approach. The computational approach suggests that the commonly observed developmental progression from more implicit to more explicit knowledge can be viewed as a consequence of (...)
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  2. Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali (1999). Does the Hand Reflect Implicit Knowledge? Yes and No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):766-767.
    Gesture does not have a fixed position in the Dienes & Perner framework. Its status depends on the way knowledge is expressed. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be fully implicit (neither factuality nor predication is explicit) if the goal is simply to move a pointing hand to a target. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be explicit (both factuality and predication are explicit) if the goal is to indicate an object. However, gesture is not restricted to these two extreme positions. When (...)
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  3. Martha Wagner Alibali, Nicole M. McNeil & Michael A. Perrott (1998). What Makes Children Change Their Minds? Changes in Problem Encoding Lead to Changes in Strategy Selection. In M. A. Gernsbacher & S. J. Derry (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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  4. Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali (1994). Do You Have to Be Right to Redescribe? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):718.
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