Search results for 'Martial arts Zen Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Graham Priest (2013). The Martial Arts and Buddhist Philosophy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:17-28.score: 438.8
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  2. S. K. Wertz (1984). The Zen Way to the Martial Arts (Zen Et Arts Martiaux). Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 11 (1):94-103.score: 438.8
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  3. Jean Taisen Deshimaru (1985). Review Essay The Zen Way to the Martial Arts (Zen Et Arts Martiawc). Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 11:94-103.score: 438.8
     
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  4. Stewart McFarlane (2001). Buddhism and the New Warriors: Eastern Martial Arts in Western Contexts. Contemporary Buddhism 2 (2):153-168.score: 436.5
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  5. Stephen Addiss (2001). Book Review: Joseph D. Parker, Zen Buddhist Landscape Arts of Early Muromachi Japan (1336-1573). [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28:184-186.score: 427.5
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  6. Takuan Sōhō (1986/2012). The Unfettered Mind. Shambhala.score: 408.0
    Introduction -- The Mysterious record of immovable wisdom -- The clear sound of jewels -- Annals of the Sword Taia.
     
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  7. Chozan Niwa (2006). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts and Other Tales. Kodansha International.score: 369.0
    The Demon said to the swordsman, "Fundamentally, man's mind is not without good. It is simply that from the moment he has life, he is always being brought up with perversity. Thus, having no idea that he has gotten used to being soaked in it, he harms his self-nature and falls into evil. Human desire is the root of this perversity." Woven deeply into the martial traditions and folklore of Japan, the fearsome Tengu dwell in the country's mountain forest. (...)
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  8. Leesa S. Davis (2010). Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism: Deconstructive Modes of Spiritual Inquiry. Continuum.score: 267.0
    Introduction: Experiential deconstructive inquiry -- Foundational philosophies and spiritual methods -- Non-duality in Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism -- Ontological differences and non-duality -- Meditative inquiry, questioning, and dialoguing as a means to spiritual insight -- The undoing or deconstruction of dualistic conceptions -- Advaita Vedanta : philosophical foundations and deconstructive strategies -- Sources of the tradition -- Upaniads that art thou (Tat Tvam Asi) -- Gauapda (c.7th century) : no bondage, no liberation -- Aakara (c.7th-8th century) : there (...)
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  9. Toshihiko Izutsu (1977/1982). Toward a Philosophy of Zen Buddhism. Prajñā Press.score: 267.0
    The true man without any rank.--Two dimensions of ego consciousness.--Sense and nonsense in Zen Buddhism.--The philosophical problem of articulation.--Thinking and a-thinking through kōan.--The interior and exterior in Zen.--The elimination of color in Far Eastern art and photography.
     
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  10. Mara Miller (2010). Muroji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple by Fowler, Sherry D. Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery by Levine, Gregory P. A. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):176-179.score: 218.0
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  11. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Review of Sherry D. Fowler's Muroji: Rearranging Art and History at a Japanese Buddhist Temple and Gregory Levine's Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.score: 218.0
     
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  12. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.score: 216.0
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because it operates (...)
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  13. Mark T. Unno (1999). Questions in the Making: A Review Essay on Zen Buddhist Ethics in the Context of Buddhist and Comparative Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507 - 536.score: 216.0
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed works and identifies issues and problems (...)
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  14. Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.score: 216.0
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial (...)
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  15. Jacob Raz (2006). Zen Budhizm: Filosofyah Ṿe-Esteṭiḳah. Miśrad Ha-Biṭaḥon.score: 216.0
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  16. Dale Stuart Wright (1998). Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    This book is the first to engage Zen Buddhism philosophically on crucial issues from a perspective that is informed by the traditions of western philosophy and religion. It focuses on one renowned Zen master, Huang Po, whose recorded sayings exemplify the spirit of the 'golden age' of Zen in medieval China, and on the transmission of these writings to the West. The author makes a bold attempt to articulate a post-romantic understanding of Zen applicable to contemporary world culture. While (...)
     
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  17. Faustino Luiz Couto Teixeira (2012). A espiritualidade zen budista (Zen Buddhist Spirituality) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p704. Horizonte 10 (27):704-727.score: 210.0
    The comparative study of mysticism and inter-religious spirituality has gained more space in universities and research centers that radiate everywhere. They are also research involving Eastern religions, in its peculiar mystical trait. Also in the context of Buddhism one can talk on spirituality, understood as a search path of liberation. This article presents the theme of Zen Buddhist spirituality based on the reflection of Eihei Dogen Zenji (1200 – 1253), one of the most important and prominent teachers of the (...)
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  18. Damon A. Young (2009). Bowing to Your Enemies: Courtesy, Budō , and Japan. Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 188-215.score: 198.0
    Courtesy seems to be an essential part of budō , the Japanese martial ways. Yet there is no prima facie relationship between fighting and courtesy. Indeed, we might think that violence and aggression are antithetical to etiquette and care. By situating budō within the three great Japanese traditions of Shintō, Confucianism, and Zen Buddhism, this article reveals the intimate relationship between courtesy and the martial arts. It suggests that courtesy cultivates, and is cultivated by, purity of (...)
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  19. Robert Aitken (1984). The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. North Point Press.score: 195.0
    In Taking the Path of Zen , Robert Aitken provided a concise guide to zazen (Zen meditation) and other aspects of the practice of Zen. In The Mind of Clover he addresses the world beyond the zazen cushions, illuminating issues of appropriate personal and social action through an exploration of the philosophical complexities of Zen ethics. Aitken's approach is clear and sure as he shows how our minds can be as nurturing as clover, which enriches the soil and benefits the (...)
     
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  20. Gillian Russell (forthcoming). Epistemic Viciousness in the Martial Arts. In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Martial Arts and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 189.0
    When I was eleven, my form teacher, Mr Howard, showed some of my class how to punch. We were waiting for the rest of the class to finish changing after gym, and he took a stance that I would now call shizentai yoi and snapped his right fist forward into a head-level straight punch, pulling his left back to his side at the same time. Then he punched with his left, pulling back on his right. We all lined up in (...)
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  21. Erich Fromm (1960/1986). Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism. Unwin Paperbacks.score: 189.0
  22. Herman P. Kauz (1992). A Path to Liberation: A Spiritual and Philosophical Approach to the Martial Arts. Overlook Press.score: 189.0
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  23. Herman Kauz (1977). The Martial Spirit: An Introduction to the Origin, Philosophy, and Psychology of the Martial Arts. Overlook Press.score: 189.0
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  24. Jhoon Rhee (2000). Jhoon Rhee Martial Arts: Philosophy & Life Skills. Jhoon Rhee Foundation for International Leadership.score: 189.0
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  25. Seán Michael Wilson (2013). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts: A Graphic Novel. Shambhala.score: 189.0
    Transformation of the sparrow and the butterfly -- Meeting the gods of poverty in a dream -- The greatest joys of the cicada and its cast-off shell -- The owl's understanding -- The centipede questions the snake -- The toad's way of the gods -- The mysterious technique of the cat -- Afterword by William Scott Wilson.
     
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  26. Christopher Ives (2009). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 174.0
    Despite the importance of Ichikawa's writings, this volume is the first by any scholar to outline his critique.
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  27. Heesoon Bai & Avraham Cohen (2014). Zen and the Art of Storytelling. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):597-608.score: 171.0
    This paper explores the contribution of Zen storytelling to moral education. First, an understanding of Zen practice, what it is and how it is achieved, is established. Second, the connection between Zen practice and ethics is shown in terms of the former’s ability to cultivate moral emotions and actions. It is shown that Zen practice works at the roots of consciousness where, according to the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, the possibility of human goodness, known as bodhicitta (awakened heartmind), lies. (...)
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  28. Sŏnggak (ed.) (2005). Sŏn Yesul Ŭi Ihae. Kyŏngin Munhwasa.score: 171.0
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  29. Henry Rosemont Jr (1970). Is Zen Buddhism a Philosophy? Philosophy East and West 20 (1):63-72.score: 162.0
    Following the lead of daisetz t. Suzuki, The authors of almost all english-Language commentaries on zen buddhism are in general agreement that zen is not a philosophy. The primary purpose of this paper is to show how and why this view is fundamentally mistaken and that the continued espousal of it is counterproductive for furthering an understanding of any facet of zen, Philosophical or otherwise.
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  30. Barry Allen (2013). Games of Sport, Works of Art, and the Striking Beauty of Asian Martial Arts. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):241 - 254.score: 162.0
    Martial-arts practice is not quite anything else: it is like sport, but is not sport; it constantly refers to and as it were cohabits with violence, but is not violent; it is dance-like but not dance. It shares a common athleticism with sports and dance, yet stands apart from both, especially through its paradoxical commitment to the external value of being an instrument of violence. My discussion seeks to illuminate martial arts practice by systematic contrast to (...)
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  31. Dick Garner (1977). Skepticism, Ordinary Language and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 27 (2):165-181.score: 162.0
    The goal of tranquility through non-Assertion, Advocated by sextus empiricus, Is examined and his method criticized. His understanding of non-Assertion is compared with that of seng-Chao (383-414) and chi-Tsang (549-623). Zen buddhism shares the quest for tranquility, But offers more than sextus did to help us attain it, And avoids the excessively metaphysical thought of these two chinese buddhists. Wittgenstein, Whose goal was that philosophical problems completely disappear, And austin, Who rejected many standard western dichotomies, Offer a method superior (...)
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  32. Jacob Raz (2010). “Kill the Buddha” Quietism in Action and Quietism as Action in Zen Buddhist Thought and Practice. Common Knowledge 16 (3):439-456.score: 162.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article proposes that, despite endless debates within Zen Buddhism between quietist tendencies (“sitting quietly, doing nothing”) and the instruction to act in the world (“go wash the dishes”), Zen has always held a nondualist approach that denies any contradiction between these seemingly distinct ways. Zen has never really seen them as distinct. The article does survey, however, several quietist sources for Zen in early Indian (...)
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  33. Donald W. Mitchell (1980). Faith in Zen Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):183-197.score: 162.0
    There is an impression among western students of zen buddhism that faith does not play an important role in the zen tradition. This paper argues that in fact faith does have an important function in zen. The analysis relates this function to both the distinctly intuitive nature of enlightenment and the practice of meditation. The thesis is that these two phenomena can be more fully understood when related to the phenomenon of faith rather than simply distinguished from faith. Faith (...)
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  34. Yong Zhi (2013). The Poetic Transmission of Zen Buddhism. Asian Culture and History 5 (2):p25.score: 162.0
    This paper intends to understand the experience of enlightenment in Zen Buddhism from a perspective of poetics. Enlightenment is understood as an existential breakthrough, which delivers people from the habitual or conventional mind set into new horizon of consciousness. This breakthrough takes place in one’s overall consciousness rather than only in cognitive thought. Therefore, it cannot be adequately described on an abstract level with a conceptual paradigm. The poetic language provides a significant alternative for capturing this leap and revealing (...)
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  35. Charles Muller, Zen Buddhism and Western Scholarship: Will the Twain Ever Meet?score: 159.0
    If we reflect on the history of Buddhism, we should be able to acknowledge as an anomaly the present yawning chasm to be seen between North American / Japanese academic scholarship that deals with Zen/Chan and the corresponding practice community. We have on one hand a religious tradition that has, due to a combination of its own rhetorical choices and various historical turns, become largely bereft of the ongoing production of significant scholarship concerning its own history and doctrine (...)
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  36. Steven Heine (2013). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Koan in Zen Buddhism. Oup Usa.score: 159.0
    Steven Heine offers a compelling examination of the Mu Koan, widely considered to be the single best known and most widely circulated and transmitted koan record of the Zen school of Buddhism.
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  37. Steve Odin (2013). Illuminations Of The Quotidian in Nishida, Chan/Zen Buddhism, and Sino‐Japanese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (S1):135-145.score: 159.0
    Return to the ordinary as extraordinary has become the signature motif for the Emersonian perfectionism of Stanley Cavell in contemporary American philosophy. In this article I develop Cavell's notion of “the ordinary” as an intercultural theme for exploring aspects of traditional Chinese philosophy, especially Confucianism and Chan Buddhism. I further use Cavell's philosophy of the ordinary to examine Sino-Japanese thought as found in the Zen tradition of Japan and its reformulation by Nishida Kitarô in modern Japanese philosophy. It will (...)
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  38. Jerry Grenard (2008). The Phenomenology of Koan Meditation in Zen Buddhism. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (2):151-188.score: 153.0
    Zen students described their experiences when working with koans, and a phenomenological method was used to identify the structure of those experiences. Zen koans are statements or stories developed in China and Japan by Zen masters in order to help students transform their conscious awareness of the world. Eight participants including 3 females and 5 males from Southern California with 1 to 30 years of experience in Zen answered open-ended questions about koan practice in one tape-recorded session for each participant. (...)
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  39. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1938). Zen Buddhism and its Influence on Japanese Culture. Kyoto, the Eastern Buddhist Society.score: 147.0
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  40. James Mark Shields (2012). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):128-130.score: 144.0
    While there has been a surge in scholarship on Imperial Way Buddhism (kōdō Bukkyō) in the past several decades, little attention has been paid, particularly in Western scholarship, to the life and work of Ichikawa Hakugen (1902–1986), the most prominent and sophisticated postwar critic of the role of Buddhism, and particularly Zen, in modern Japanese militarism. By way of a thorough and critical investigation of Ichikawa’s critique, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen’s Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics by (...)
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  41. Jin Park (2010). Buddhism and Postmodernity: Zen, Huayan, and the Possibility of Buddhist Postmodern Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 144.0
    Through a close analysis of Zen encounter dialogues (gong'ans) and Huayan Buddhist philosophy, Buddhism and Postmodernity offers a new ethical paradigm for Buddhist-postmodern philosophy.
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  42. John Steffney (1977). Transmetaphysical Thinking in Heidegger and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 27 (3):323-335.score: 141.0
    In heidegger's philosophy, Getting back to the ground of metaphysics--Transcending metaphysics--Entails a transcendence of the ordinary function of human consciousness. Zen's transcendence however--Especially with regard to subject-Object duality--Is much more radical than heidegger's. Even the late heidegger, Heidegger iii, Presents his "ereignis" as a third, Appropriating ontological link, Existing beyond being and nonbeing. But in zen this would be classified as "relative" "sunyata", Not "absolute" "sunyata", Which is neither relative nor relational but paradoxical to the extent that it does not (...)
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  43. Simon P. James (2003). Zen Buddhism and the Intrinsic Value of Nature. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):143-157.score: 141.0
    It is a perennial theme in the literature on environmental ethics that the exploitation of the environment is the result of a blindness to (or perhaps a refusal to recognize) the intrinsic value of natural beings. The general story here is that Western traditions of thought have tended to accord natural beings value only to the extent that they prove useful to humans, that they have tended to see nature as only instrumentally valuable. By contrast, it is said that a (...)
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  44. Eiko Kawamura-Hanaoka (forthcoming). The Significance of Luke-Acts for Zen Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 141.0
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  45. Rupert Read (2009). Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism: One Practice, No Dogma. In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 13--23.score: 141.0
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  46. Dharma Bell, Dharan ı Pillar, Li Po’S. Buddhist Inscriptions By & Paul W. Kroll (2003). At the Eleventh Hour: The Biography of Swami Rama. By Pandit Rajmani Tigu-Nait, Ph. D. Honesdale, Pennsylvania: Himalayan Institute Press, 2002. Pp. 427. Hardcover $18.95. Awakening and Insight: Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy. Edited by Polly Young-Eisendrath and Shoji Muramoto. Hove, England: Brunner-Routledge, 2002. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 53 (3):431-434.score: 141.0
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  47. Maria Reis Habito (2005). The Voice of God on Mount Sinai: Rabbinic Commentaries on Exodus 20:1 in Light of Sufi and Zen-Buddhist Texts (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):278-283.score: 141.0
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  48. Eric Sean Nelson (2005). Opening a Mountain: Koans of the Zen Masters, And: The Koan: Texts and Contexts in Zen Buddhism (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):284-288.score: 141.0
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  49. Elisabetta Porcu (forthcoming). Staging Zen Buddhism: Image Creation in Contemporary Films. Contemporary Buddhism:1-16.score: 141.0
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  50. Robert Aitken (2009). Who Hears?: A Zen Buddhist Perspective. Buddhist-Christian Studies 29 (1):89-94.score: 141.0
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