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  1. Helen L. Williams, Martin A. Conway & Chris Ja Moulin (2013). Remembering and Knowing: Using Another's Subjective Report to Make Inferences About Memory Strength and Subjective Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):572-588.
    The Remember–Know paradigm is commonly used to examine experiential states during recognition. In this paradigm, whether a Know response is defined as a high-confidence state of certainty or a low-confidence state based on familiarity varies across researchers, and differences in definitions and instructions have been shown to influence participants’ responding. Using a novel approach, in three internet-based questionnaires participants were placed in the role of ‘memory expert’ and classified others’ justifications of recognition decisions. Results demonstrated that participants reliably differentiated between (...)
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  2. Mehdi Bennouna-Greene, Fabrice Berna, Martin A. Conway, Clare J. Rathbone, Pierre Vidailhet & Jean-Marie Danion (2012). Self-Images and Related Autobiographical Memories in Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):247-257.
    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness, which affects sense of identity. While the ability to have a coherent vision of the self relies partly on its reciprocal relationships with autobiographical memories, little is known about how memories ground “self-images” in schizophrenia. Twenty-five patients with schizophrenia and 25 controls were asked to give six autobiographical memories related to four self-statements they considered essential for defining their identity. Results showed that patients’ self-images were more passive than those of controls. Autobiographical memories underlying (...)
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  3. Aikaterini Fotopoulou, Donald Pfaff & Martin A. Conway (eds.) (2012). From the Couch to the Lab: Trends in Psychodynamic Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.
    Can the psychodynamics of the mind be correlated with neurodynamic processes in the brain? The book revisits a question that scientists and psychoanalysts have been asking for more than a century. It brings together experts from Psychology, Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychiatry and Neurology to consider this question.
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  4. Fabrice Berna, Mehdi Bennouna-Greene, Jevita Potheegadoo, Paulina Verry, Martin A. Conway & Jean-Marie Danion (2011). Impaired Ability to Give a Meaning to Personally Significant Events in Patients with Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):703-711.
    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness affecting sense of identity. Autobiographical memory deficits observed in schizophrenia could contribute to this altered sense of identity. The ability to give a meaning to personally significant events is also critical for identity construction and self-coherence. Twenty-four patients with schizophrenia and 24 control participants were asked to recall five self-defining memories. We assessed meaning making in participants’ narratives and afterwards asked them explicitly to give a meaning to their memories . We found that both (...)
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  5. Clare J. Rathbone, Martin A. Conway & Chris J. A. Moulin (2011). Remembering and Imagining: The Role of the Self. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1175-1182.
    This study investigated whether temporal clustering of autobiographical memories around periods of self-development would also occur when imagining future events associated with the self. Participants completed an AM task and future thinking task. In both tasks, memories and future events were cued using participant-generated identity statements . Participants then dated their memories and future events, and finally gave an age at which each identity statement was judged to emerge. Dates of memories and future events were recoded as temporal distance from (...)
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  6. Catriona M. Morrison & Martin A. Conway (2010). First Words and First Memories. Cognition 116 (1):23-32.
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  7. Caroline L. Horton, Christopher J. A. Moulin & Martin A. Conway (2009). The Self and Dreams During a Period of Transition. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):710-717.
    The content of dreams and changes to the self were investigated in students moving to University. In study 1, 20 participants completed dream diaries and memory tasks before and after they had left home and moved to university, and generated self images, “I am…” statements , reflective of their current self. Changes in “I ams” were observed, indicating a newly-formed ‘university’ self. These self, images and related autobiographical knowledge were found to be incorporated into recent dreams but not into dreams (...)
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  8. Helen L. Williams & Martin A. Conway (2009). Networks of Autobiographical Memories. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge. 33--61.
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  9. Alan Baddeley, John P. Aggleton & Martin A. Conway (eds.) (2002). Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
    The term 'episodic memory' refers to our memory for unique, personal experiences, that we can date at some point in our past - our first day at school, the day we got married. It has again become a topic of great importance and interest to psychologists, neuroscientists, and philosophers. How are such memories stored in the brain, why do certain memories disappear (especially those from early in childhood), what causes false memories (memories of events we erroneously believe have really taken (...)
     
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  10. Martin A. Conway (2002). Sensory-Perceptual Episodic Memory and its Context: Autobiographical Memory. In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oup Oxford.
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  11. Martin A. Conway (2001). Phenomenological Records and the Self-Memory System. In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormark (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press. 235--255.
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  12. Martin A. Conway, A. F. Collins, Stephen J. Anderson & G. Cohen (1998). Changes in Memory Awareness During Learning: The Acquisition of Knowledge by Psychology Undergraduates. Journal of Experimental Psychology.
  13. Martin A. Conway (1996). What Do Memories Correspond To? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):195.
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  14. Martin A. Conway, Alan F. Collins, Susan E. Gathercole & Stephen J. Anderson (1996). Recollections of True and False Autobiographical Memories. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 125 (1):69.
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  15. Martin A. Conway & S. A. Dewhurst (1995). The Self and Recollective Experience. Applied Cognitive Psychology 9:1-19.
     
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  16. A. Collins, S. Gathercole, Martin A. Conway & P. E. Morris (eds.) (1993). Theories of Memory. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This is a collection of chapters by some of the most influential memory researchers.
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  17. Martin A. Conway & David C. Rubin (1993). The Structure of Autobiographical Memory. In A. Collins, S. Gathercole, Martin A. Conway & P. E. Morris (eds.), Theories of Memory. Lawrence Erlbaum. 103--137.
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  18. Martin A. Conway (1992). A Structural Model of Autobiographical Memory. In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer. 167--193.
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  19. Martin A. Conway (1992). Making Sense of the Past. In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer. 3--10.
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  20. Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.) (1992). Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer.
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  21. Peter Hayes, Martin A. Conway & Peter E. Morris (1992). Evaluating “the Cognitive Structure of Emotions” Using Autobiographical Memories of Emotional Events. In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer. 353--374.
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