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  1. Martin Gunderson (forthcoming). A Millian Analysis of Rights. Ideas y Valores.
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  2. Martin Gunderson (2013). Human Rights and the Virtue of Democratic Civility. Social Philosophy Today 29:61-74.
    Democratic civility is a core civic virtue of persons engaged in democratic deliberation. It is a complex trait that includes tolerance of diverse political views, openness regarding civic matters to reasons offered by others, willingness to seek compromise in an effort to find workable political solutions, and willingness to limit one’s individual interests for the public good when there are adequate reasons for doing so. Various writers have noted a tension between rights and civility. Insofar as rights trump general considerations (...)
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  3. Martin Gunderson (2011). Does the Human Right to Health Lack Content? Social Philosophy Today 27:49-62.
    The human right to health is crucial in the fight against global poverty. Health and an adequate standard of living are intimately connected. Poor health can make it difficult to overcome poverty, and poverty can make it difficult to attain good health. For the human right to health to be effective, however, it must have sufficient content to do the important normative work of rights. In the first part of this paper I give plausible arguments against the very existence of (...)
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  4. Martin Gunderson (2009). The Virtues of Scholarship and the Virtues of Political Action. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):pp. 171-184.
  5. Martin Gunderson (2008). Enhancing Human Rights: How the Use of Human Rights Treaties to Prohibit Genetic Engineering Weakens Human Rights. Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1):27-34.
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  6. Martin Gunderson (2007). Seeking Perfection: A Kantian Look at Human Genetic Engineering. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2):87-102.
    It is tempting to argue that Kantian moral philosophy justifies prohibiting both human germ-line genetic engineering and non-therapeutic genetic engineering because they fail to respect human dignity. There are, however, good reasons for resisting this temptation. In fact, Kant’s moral philosophy provides reasons that support genetic engineering—even germ-line and non-therapeutic. This is true of Kant’s imperfect duties to seek one’s own perfection and the happiness of others. It is also true of the categorical imperative. Kant’s moral philosophy does, however, provide (...)
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  7. Jeffrey T. Berger & Martin Gunderson (2006). Say What You Mean and Mean What You Say: A Patient's Conflicting Preferences for Care. Hastings Center Report 36 (1):14-15.
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  8. Martin Gunderson (2006). Human Rights, Dignity, and the Science of Genetic Engineering. Social Philosophy Today 22:43-57.
    In the past decade several international declarations have called for banning reproductive non-therapeutic and germ-line engineering. Article 11 of UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights states that practices that are contrary to human dignity such as cloning of human beings should not be permitted. Article 12 of the same declaration restricts genetic applications to the relief from suffering and the improvement of health. The European Council has also taken a strong stand on germ-line genetic engineering in (...)
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  9. Martin Gunderson (2004). A Kantian View of Suicide and End-of-Life Treatment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):277–287.
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  10. Martin Gunderson (2004). Being a Burden: Reflections on Refusing Medical Care. Hastings Center Report 34 (5):37-43.
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  11. Martin Gunderson (2004). The Centrality of Normative Ethical Theory. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):271-272.
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  12. David J. Mayo & Martin Gunderson (2002). Vitalism Revitalized: Vulnerable Populations, Prejudice, and Physician‐Assisted Death. Hastings Center Report 32 (4):14-21.
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  13. Martin Gunderson & David J. Mayo (2000). Restricting Physician‐Assisted Death to the Terminally Ill. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):17-23.
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  14. David J. Mayo & Martin Gunderson (2000). The Right to Same-Sex Marriage: A Critique of the Leftist Critique. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):326–337.
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  15. Martin Gunderson (1997). Eliminating Conflicts of Interest in Managed Care Organizations Through Disclosure and Consent. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (2-3):192-198.
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  16. Martin Gunderson, David J. Mayo & Frank S. Rhame (1996). Routine HIV Testing of Hospital Patients and Pregnant Women: Informed Consent in the Real World. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (2):161-182.
    : The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that HIV testing be routinely offered to certain patients in hospitals with a high prevalence of HIV infection and on all pregnant women. The CDC does not, however, offer implementation level guidelines for obtaining informed consent. We provide a moral justification for requiring informed consent for HIV testing and propose guidelines for securing such consent. In particular we argue that genuine informed consent can be secured without elaborate counseling, such (...)
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  17. David J. Mayo, Frank S. Rhame & Martin Gunderson (1996). Routine HIV Testing of Hospital Patients and Pregnant Women: Informed Consent in the Real World. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (2):161-182.
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  18. Martin Gunderson (1993). Physician Assisted Death and Hard Choices. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):329-341.
    We argue that after the passage of a physician assisted death law some inequities in the health care system which prevent people from getting the medical care they need will become reasons for choosing assisted death. This raises the issue of whether there is compelling moral reason to change those inequities after the passage of an assisted death law. We argue that the passage of an assisted death law will not create additional moral reasons for eliminating inequities simply because they (...)
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  19. Karen J. Warren & Martin Gunderson (1991). The Feminist Critique of Liberalism. Social Philosophy Today 5:387-410.
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  20. Martin Gunderson (1990). Justifying a Principle of Informed Consent: A Case Study in Autonomy-Based Ethics. Public Affairs Quarterly 4 (3):249-265.
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  21. Martin Gunderson (1989). Protecting Commerical Speech. Social Philosophy Today 2:231-239.
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  22. Martin Gunderson (1979). Threats and Coercion. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):247 - 259.
    There is nearly universal agreement that coercion is an evil. Even when it is necessary to avoid a greater evil or to attain some good, it is still a necessary evil. There is also nearly universal agreement that, other things being equal, one ought not to exercise coercion. Here the agreement ends. There is little agreement about just when coercion is justified. More surprisingly, there is little agreement about what coercion is. This latter controversy is more fundamental, and this paper (...)
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