PhilPapers is currently in read-only mode while we are performing some maintenance. You can use the site normally except that you cannot sign in. This shouldn't last long.
98 found
Sort by:
  1. Richard Bellamy & Martin Hollis (eds.) (1999). Pluralism and Liberal Neutrality. F. Cass.
    Michel Foucault (1926-84) was one of the most renowned of late 20th century social philosophers. He covered an enormous range: from sexuality to prisons; from identity to power; from knowledge to politics. The essays written for this book range over all of Foucault's work, but their main critical focus is upon objectivity, power and knowledge. The very possibility of a critical stance is a recurring theme in all of Foucault's works, and the contributors vary in the ways that they relate (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard Bellamy & Martin Hollis (1998). Consensus, Neutrality and Compromise. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (3):54-78.
    (1998). Consensus, neutrality and compromise. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 1, Pluralsim and Liberal Neutrality, pp. 54-78. doi: 10.1080/13698239808403248.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Martin Hollis (1996). Reason in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of Social Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Did Adam and Eve act rationally in eating the fruit of the forbidden tree? That can seem to depend solely on whether they had found the best means to their ends, in the spirit of the 'economic' theories of rationality. Martin Hollis respects the elegance and power of these theories but judges their paradoxes endemic. He argues that social action cannot be understood by viewing human beings as abstract individuals with preferences in search of satisfaction, nor by divorcing practical reason (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard Bellamy & Martin Hollis (1995). Liberal Justice: Political and Metaphysical. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):1-19.
  5. Raymond Geuss & Martin Hollis (1995). Freedom as an Ideal. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 69:87 - 112.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Martin Hollis (1994). The Gingerbread Game. Analysis 54 (4):196 - 200.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Martin Hollis (1994). The Philosophy of Social Science: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This textbook by Martin Hollis offers an exceptionally clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of social science. It examines questions which give rise to fundamental philosophical issues. Are social structures better conceived of as systems of laws and forces, or as webs of meanings and practices? Is social action better viewed as rational behaviour, or as self-expression? By exploring such questions, the reader is led to reflect upon the nature of scientific method in social science. Is the aim to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Martin Hollis (1993). Understanding Action: An Essay on Reasons by Frederic Schick. Journal of Philosophy 90 (10):531-533.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Martin Hollis & Robert Sugden (1993). Rationality in Action. Mind 102 (405):1-35.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Martin Hollis (1992). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 101 (403):553-554.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Martin Hollis (1992). Book Review:Philosophy of Social Science. David Braybrooke. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):665-.
  12. Martin Hollis (1992). Trouble with Leprechauns. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 33:25-39.
    The impulse to philosophy is often provided by leprechauns, mischievous little sprites who lurk at the end of fine chains of reasoning and make trouble. They delight in absurdity and paradox, and are especially happy to help ambitious thinkers dig their own graves. Philosophers spend much of their lives trying to put a stop to leprechauns or fencing them out with the aid of reason. But in truth the relationship is symbiotic. If a realm of thought can be made fully (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Martin Hollis (1992). Puzzles and Posers. Cogito 6 (1):45-45.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robin P. Cubitt & Martin Hollis (1991). The Mutual Investment Game: Peculiarities of Indifference. Analysis 51 (3):113 - 120.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Martin Hollis (1991). Friends, Romans, and Consumers. Ethics 102 (1):27-41.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Martin Hollis (1991). Penny Pinching and Backward Induction. Journal of Philosophy 88 (9):473-488.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Martin Hollis & Wilhelm Vossenkuhl (1991). Rationalitèat Und Soziales Verstehen Wittgenstein-Vorlesungen der Universitèat Bayreuth.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Martin Hollis (1990). HURLEY, S. L. Natural Reasons: Personality and Polity. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65:528.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Martin Hollis (1990). Moves and Motives in the Games We Play. Analysis 50 (2):49 - 62.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Martin Hollis (1990). Puzzles and Posers. Cogito 4 (2):30-30.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Martin Hollis (1990). Market Equality and Social Freedom. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):15-24.
    ABSTRACT Conflicts between the good of each and the good of all are often presented in terms of freedom versus equality, with liberals pulled one way by libertarians and the other by social democrats. When we distinguish between negative and positive notions not only of freedom but also of equality, the liberal freedom ‘to pursue our own good in our own way’is a positive freedom involving a negative idea of equality . Yet ‘equity’is not strong enough to deal with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Martin Hollis (1990). Natural Reasons: Personality and Polity By S. L. Hurley Oxford University Press, 1990, Xii + 462 Pp., £40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (254):528-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Martin Hollis & Steve Smith (1990). Explaining and Understanding International Relations. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Martin Hollis (1989). Atomic Energy and Moral Glue. Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (2):185–193.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Martin Hollis (1989). Honour Among Thieves. Proceedings of the British Academy 75:163-180.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Martin Hollis (1989). No Title Available: New Books. [REVIEW] Philosophy 64 (247):113-114.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Martin Hollis (1989). SPRIGGE, T. L. S. The Rational Foundations of Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy 64:113.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Martin Hollis (1989). Three Men in a Muddle. Cogito 3 (3):255-256.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Martin Hollis (1989). The Rational Foundations of Ethics By T. L. S. Sprigge Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1988, 283 Pp., £25.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 64 (247):113-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Martin Hollis (1988). A Death of One's Own. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:1-15.
    Rilke's remark conjures up an officious array of well-meaning persons bent on completing our orderly passage from cradle to grave. They tidy our files cosily about us, inject us with extreme unction and slide us into the warm embrace of the undertaker. At the forefront of the array stands the doctor, part mechanic and part priest. His main task is to repair the living with resources whose effective and impartial allocation is a chief topic of medical ethics. But his role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Martin Hollis (1988). Puzzles & Posers. Cogito 2 (3):28-28.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Martin Hollis (1988). Say It with Flowers. In James Tully (ed.), Meaning and Context: Quentin Skinner and His Critics. Polity Press
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Martin Hollis (1987). Puzzles & Posers: Hell Of A Gamble. Cogito 1 (3):28-28.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Martin Hollis (1987). The Cunning of Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, the author is attempting to make sense, as a philosopher, of the ideas of rationality put forward by economists, sociologists, and political theorists. The book intervenes in intense current debates within and among several disciplines. Its concern is with the true nature of social actors and the proper character of social science. Its arguments are the more challenging for being presented in simple, incisive, and lucid prose.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Martin Hollis & David Howe (1987). Moral Risks in Social Work. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):123-133.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Martin Hollis (1986). More Paradoxical Epistemics. Analysis 46 (4):217 - 218.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Martin Hollis (1986). The Presidential Address: Reasons of Honour. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 87:1 - 19.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Lamarque, Martin Hollis & Anthony O'Hear (1986). Two IntroductionsInvitation to Philosophy.What Philosophy Is: An Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (145):540.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Martin Hollis (1985). Invitation to Philosophy. Blackwell.
  40. Martin Hollis (1985). Of Masks and Men. In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Martin Hollis (1985). Of Masks and Men Martin Hollis. In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press 217.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Martin Hollis (1985). Report on Analysis 'Problem' No. 20. Analysis 45 (4):177 - 178.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Martin Hollis (1985). The Emperor's Newest Clothes. Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):128-133.
    There is a simple joy in finding that the emperor has positively no clothes and especially when the finger is pointed in ribald good English. Donald McCloskey does this service in “The Rhetoric of Economics”, where he argues with force and wit that “modernism” (meaning, roughly, positivism, as in “Positive Economics”) will do as an account neither of what economists do nor of what it makes philosophical sense for them to attempt. Instead they should recognize that models are always metaphors (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Martin Hollis (1984). A Paradoxical Train of Thought. Analysis 44 (4):205 - 206.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Martin Hollis (1984). Positional Goods. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:97-110.
    In days gone by, when we had something called Rapid Economic Growth, we used to worry about it. We worried especially about its social costs and its technical limits. If growth meant gearing people to efficient production, we would have to be geographically and socially mobile. That threatened our old ways of community life, with their neighbourhood values and extended families. There were more obvious costs too, like chemicals in the air and highways through the landscape. Furthermore, the cornucopia need (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Martin Hollis (1983). Beiträge zur Philosophie von Stephan Körner. Grazer Philosophische Studien 20:3-15.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Martin Hollis (1983). Categorial Imprisonment. Grazer Philosophische Studien 20:3-15.
    Stephan Körner is a noble guardian of the grand tradition in philosophy and has given us many reasons to wish him well. But here I take him admiringly to task for doubting that there are eternal verities. The conceptual puzzles of anthropology yield a case for the epistemological unity of mankind. In understanding the thought of other cultures, we cannot fail to find in it some of our own categories, constitutive principles and maximal kinds. Their logic must be, at heart, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Martin Hollis (1983). Jim and the Indians. Analysis 43 (1):36 - 39.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Martin Hollis (1983). Rational Preferences. Philosophical Forum 14 (3):246.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Martin Hollis (1983). The Social Liberty Game. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 15:31-44.
    It might surprise someone, who knew only On Liberty , to hear J. S. Mill called the father of British socialism. That would sound a careless bid for a respectable pedigree, on a par with hailing King Canute as father of the British seaside holiday. Mill is passionate there about making the individual a protected species, not to be interfered with even for his own good, unless to prevent harm to others. He is so passionate that government seems at times (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 98