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  1. Daniel Brian Krupp, Lindsay A. Sewall, Martin L. Lalumière, Craig Sheriff & Grant Harris (2013). Psychopathy, Adaptation, and Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  2. Daniel Brian Krupp, Lindsay A. Sewall, Martin L. Lalumière, Craig Sheriff & Grant T. Harris (2012). Nepotistic Patterns of Violent Psychopathy: Evidence for Adaptation? Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Psychopaths routinely disregard social norms by engaging in selfish, antisocial, often violent behavior. Commonly characterized as mentally disordered, recent evidence suggests that psychopaths are executing a well-functioning, if unscrupulous strategy that historically increased reproductive success at the expense of others. Natural selection ought to have favored strategies that spared close kin from harm, however, because actions affecting the fitness of genetic relatives contribute to an individual’s inclusive fitness. Conversely, there is evidence that mental disorders can disrupt psychological mechanisms designed to (...)
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  3. Pat Barclay & Martin L. Lalumière (2006). Do People Differentially Remember Cheaters? Human Nature 17 (1):98-113.
    The evolution of reciprocal altruism probably involved the evolution of mechanisms to detect cheating and remember cheaters. In a well-known study, Mealey, Daood, and Krage (1996) observed that participants had enhanced memory for faces that had previously been associated with descriptions of acts of cheating. There were, however, problems with the descriptions that were used in that study. We sought to replicate and extend the findings of Mealey and colleagues by using more controlled descriptions and by examining the possibility of (...)
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  4. Karine Côté, Ray Blanchard & Martin L. Lalumiere (2003). The Influence of Birth Order on Birth Weight: Does Sex of the Preceding Siblings Matter? Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (3):455-462.
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  5. Martin L. Lalumière & Vernon L. Quinsey (2000). Good Genes, Mating Effort, and Delinquency. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):608-609.
    High mating effort and antisocial and delinquent behaviors are closely linked. Some delinquent behaviors may honestly signal genetic quality. Men who exhibit high mating effort and who have high genetic quality would be expected to engage in more sexual coercion than other men because its costs to them are lowered by female preferences for them as sexual partners.
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  6. Vernon L. Quinsey, Martin L. Lalumière, Matthew Querée & Jennifer K. McNaughton (1999). Perceived Crime Severity and Biological Kinship. Human Nature 10 (4):399-414.
    Two predictions concerning the perceived severity of crimes can be derived from evolutionary theory. The first, arising from the theory of inclusive fitness, is that crimes in general should be viewed as more serious to the degree that the victim is genetically related to the perpetrator. The second, arising from the deleterious effects of inbreeding depression, is that heterosexual sexual coercion should be perceived as more serious the closer the genetic relationship of victim and perpetrator, particularly when the victim is (...)
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  7. Martin L. Lalumière, Vernon L. Quinsey & Wendy M. Craig (1996). Why Children From the Same Family Are so Different From One Another. Human Nature 7 (3):281-290.
    The well-established finding that siblings growing up in the same family turn out to be very different from one another has puzzled psychologists and behavior geneticists alike. In this theoretical note we describe the possible ontogeny and phylogeny of a sibling differentiation mechanism. We suggest that sibling competition for parental investment results in sibling differentiation on a number of characteristics, producing different developmental trajectories within families. Variations in developmental trajectories within families may have had fitness advantages in ancestral environments because(a) (...)
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  8. Vernon L. Quinsey & Martin L. Lalumière (1995). Psychopathy is a Nonarbitrary Class. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):571-571.
    Recent evidence that psychopathy is a nonarbitrary population, such that the trait may be categorical rather than continuous, is consistent with Mealey's distinction between primary and secondary psychopaths. Thus, there are likely to be at least two routes to criminality, and psychopathic and nonpsychopathic criminals are likely to respond differently to interventions.
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