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  1. Martin Lipscomb (2014). Research Report Appraisal: How Much Understanding is Enough? Nursing Philosophy 15 (3):157-170.
    When appraising research papers, how much understanding is enough? More specifically, in deciding whether research results can inform practice, do appraisers need to substantively understand how findings are derived or is it sufficient simply to grasp that suitable analytic techniques were chosen and used by researchers? The degree or depth of understanding that research appraisers need to attain before findings can legitimately/sensibly inform practice is underexplored. In this paper it is argued that, where knowledge/justified beliefs derived from research evidence prompt (...)
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  2. Martin Lipscomb (2013). Some May Beg to Differ: Individual Beliefs and Group Political Claims. Nursing Philosophy 14 (4):254-270.
    While nurses can and do behave as intentional political agents, claims that nurses collectively do , should or must act to advance political objectives lack credibility. This paper challenges the coherence and legitimacy of political demands placed upon nurses. It is not suggested that nurses ought not to contribute to political discourse and activity. That would be foolish. However, the idea that nursing can own or exhibit a general political will is discarded. It is suggested that to protect and advance (...)
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  3. Martin Lipscomb (2012). Abductive Reasoning and Qualitative Research. Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):244-256.
    Abduction, deduction and induction describe forms of reasoning. Deduction and induction are discussed in the nursing literature. However, abduction has been largely neglected by nurse scholars. In this paper it is proposed that abduction may play a part in qualitative data analysis – specifically, in the identification of themes, codes, and categories. Abduction is not, in research, restricted to or associated with any particular methodology. Nevertheless, situating abduction in qualitative research facilitates the identification of three interlinked issues. First, it is (...)
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  4. Martin Lipscomb (2012). Questioning the Use Value of Qualitative Research Findings. Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):112-125.
    In this paper the use value of qualitative research findings to nurses in practice is questioned. More precisely it is argued that, insofar as action follows belief then, in all but the rarest of cases, the beliefs that nurses in practice can justifiably derive from or form on the basis of qualitative research findings do not sanction action in the world and the assumption, apparently widely held, that qualitative research can as evidence productively inform practice collapses. If qualitative research does (...)
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  5. Martin Lipscomb (2012). Social Justice - Special Issue. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):1-5.
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  6. Martin Lipscomb (2011). Challenging the Coherence of Social Justice as a Shared Nursing Value. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):4-11.
    Normative and prescriptive claims regarding social justice are often inadequately developed in the nursing literature and, in consequence, they must be rejected in their current form. Thus, claims regarding social justice are frequently presented as mere assertion or, alternatively, when assertions are supported that support may be weak . This paper challenges the coherence of social justice as a shared nursing value and it is suggested that claims regarding the concept should be tempered.
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  7. Martin Lipscomb (2010). Events and Event Identity: Under-Explored Topics in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):88-99.
    Theoretic interest in the nature of events and event identity is apparent across a wide range of fields. However, this interest has not yet made itself known in nursing. In this paper, it is asserted that nurse theoreticians and researchers should consider the problematic of events and event identity. It is suggested that engagement with these issues is important because the manner in which this component of explanation is integrated into argument has concrete implications for our understanding of healthcare practice. (...)
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  8. Martin Lipscomb (2008). Mixed Method Nursing Studies: A Critical Realist Critique. Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):32-45.
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  9. Martin Lipscomb (2007). Ageing, Spirituality and Well-Being. Nursing Philosophy 8 (1):68–70.
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  10. Martin Lipscomb (2007). Maintaining Patient Hopefulness: A Critique. Nursing Inquiry 14 (4):335-342.
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  11. Martin Lipscomb (2006). Critical Realism, Post-Positivism and the Possibility of Knowledge. Nursing Philosophy 7 (2):104–105.
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  12. Martin Lipscomb (2006). Review Essays - Realist Theory in Research Practice. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):362-379.
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  13. Martin Lipscomb (2006). Realist Theory in Research Practice. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):362-379.
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  14. Martin Lipscomb (2006). Rebutting the Suggestion That Anthony Giddens's Structuration Theory Offers a Useful Framework for Sociological Nursing Research: A Critique Based Upon Margaret Archer's Realist Social Theory. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):175-180.
    A recent paper in this journal by Hardcastle et al. in 2005 argued that Anthony Giddens’s Structuration Theory might usefully inform sociological nursing research. In response, a critique of ST based upon the Realist Social Theory of Margaret Archer is presented. Archer maintains that ST is fatally flawed and, in consequence, it has little to offer nursing research. Following an analysis of the concepts epiphenomenalism and elisionism, it is suggested that emergentist Realist Social Theory captures or describes a more coherent (...)
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