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Profile: Martin Shuster (Hamilton College)
  1. Martin Shuster (2014). Autonomy After Auschwitz: Adorno, German Idealism, and Modernity. University of Chicago Press.
    In Autonomy after Auschwitz, Martin Shuster explores this difficult question with astonishing theoretical acumen, examining the precise ways autonomy can lead us down a path of evil and how it might be prevented from doing so.
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  2. Martin Shuster (2014). Kant's Opus Postumum and McDowell's Critique of Kant. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (4):427-444.
    In this article, I have a modest goal: to sketch how Kant can avoid the charge of “subjective idealism” advanced against him by John McDowell and to do so with reference to Kant's last work, the so-called Opus Postumum. I am interested in defending Kant on this point because doing so not only shows how we need not—at least not because of this point about idealism—jump ship from Kant to Hegel , but also suggests that the Opus Postumum is a (...)
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  3. Martin Shuster (2013). Humor as an Optics: Bergson and the Ethics of Humor. Hypatia 28 (3):618-632.
    Although the ethics of humor is a relatively new field, it already seems to have achieved a consensus about ethics in general. In this paper, I implicitly (1) question the view of ethics that stands behind many discussions in the ethics of humor; I do this by explicitly (2) focusing on what has been a chief preoccupation in the ethics of humor: the evaluation of humor. Does the immoral content of a joke make it more or less humorous? Specifically, I (...)
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  4. Martin Shuster (2012). Language and Loneliness: Arendt, Cavell, and Modernity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):473-497.
    Abstract Many have been struck by Hannah Arendt?s remarks on loneliness in the concluding pages of The Origins of Totalitarianism, but very few have attempted to deal with the remarks in any systematic way. What is especially striking about this state of affairs is that the remarks are crucial to the account contained therein, as they betray a view of agency that undergirds the rest of the account. This article develops Arendt?s thinking on loneliness throughout her corpus, showing how loneliness (...)
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