1. Martin Stuart-Fox (forthcoming). The Origins of Causal Cognition in Early Hominins. Biology and Philosophy:1-20.
    Studies of primate cognition have conclusively shown that humans and apes share a range of basic cognitive abilities. As a corollary, these same studies have also focussed attention on what makes humans unique, and on when and how specifically human cognitive skills evolved. There is widespread agreement that a major distinguishing feature of the human mind is its capacity for causal reasoning. This paper argues that causal cognition originated with the use made of indirect natural signs by early hominins forced (...)
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  2. Martin Stuart-Fox (1999). Evolutionary Theory of History. History and Theory 38 (4):33–51.
    Several attempts have been made recently to apply Darwinian evolutionary theory to the study of culture change and social history. The essential elements in such a theory are that variations occur in population, and that a process of selective retention operates during their replication and transmission. Location of such variable units in the semantic structure of cognition provides the individual psychological basis for an evolutionary theory of history. Selection operates on both the level of cognition and on its phenotypic expression (...)
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  3. Roderick Bucknell & Martin Stuart-Fox (1989). Response to Lou Nordstrom's Review of "the Twilight Language: Explorations in Buddhist Meditation and Symbolism". Philosophy East and West 39 (2):191-196.
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