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  1. Martin Voracek, Ulrich S. Tran & Maryanne L. Fisher (2010). Evolutionary Psychology's Notion of Differential Grandparental Investment and the Dodo Bird Phenomenon: Not Everyone Can Be Right. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):39-40.
    Integration of different lines of research concerning grandparental investment appears to be both promising and necessary. However, it must stop short when confronted with incommensurate arguments and hypotheses, either within or between disciplines. Further, some hypotheses have less plausibility and veridicality than others. This point is illustrated with results that conflict previous conclusions from evolutionary psychology about differential grandparental investment.
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  2. Martin Voracek (2008). Digit Ratio (2d:4d) as a Marker for Mental Disorders: Low (Masculinized) 2d:4d in Autism-Spectrum Disorders, High (Feminized) 2d:4d in Schizophrenic-Spectrum Disorders. [REVIEW] Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):283-284.
    Augmenting and supplementing the arguments of Crespi & Badcock (C&B), I show that digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action, indeed appears differentially altered in autism-spectrum disorders (lower/masculinized) versus schizophrenic-spectrum disorders (higher/feminized). Consistent with C&B's framework, some evidence (substantial heritability, assortative mating, sex-specific familial transmission) points to possible sex chromosome and imprinted genes effects on 2D:4D expression.
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  3. Martin Voracek, Stefan G. Dressler & John T. Manning (2007). Evidence for Assortative Mating on Digit Ratio (2d:4d), a Biomarker for Prenatal Androgen Exposure. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (4):599-612.
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  4. Martin Voracek (2006). Phlogiston, Fluid Intelligence, and the Lynn–Flynn Effect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):142-143.
    Blair's assertion that fluid intelligence (gF) is distinct from general intelligence (g) is contradictory to cumulative evidence from intelligence research, including extant and novel evidence about generational IQ gains (Lynn–Flynn effect). Because of the near unity of gF and g, his hypothetical concept of gF' (gF “purged” of g variance) may well be a phlogiston theory. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  5. Martin Voracek (2006). Population Genetical Musings on Suicidal Behavior as a Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):423-424.
    Suicidal behavior is an interesting blank space in Keller & Miller's (K&M's) population genetical account on explaining the existence and persistence of common, harmful, heritable mental disorders. I argue that suicidal behavior is yet another of these disorders. It may well be consistent with all three evolutionary models considered by K&M. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  6. Martin Voracek (2005). National Intelligence, Suicide Rate in the Elderly, and a Threshold Intelligence for Suicidality: An Ecological Study of 48 Eurasian Countries. Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (6):721.
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  7. Martin Voracek (2005). Shortcomings of the Sociosexual Orientation Inventory: Can Psychometrics Inform Evolutionary Psychology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):296-297.
    Simpson and Gangestad's (1991) Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (SOI) is pivotal in Schmitt's cross-national study on sociosexuality. Here I elaborate on psychometric shortcomings of the SOI that are crucial in this research context.
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  8. Martin Voracek, Oliver Bernecker & Gemot Sonneck (2005). Suicide Myths and Misconceptions in Medical Students. Preliminary Report. In Friedrich Wallner, Martin J. Jandl & Kurt Greiner (eds.), Science, Medicine, and Culture: Festschrift for Fritz G. Wallner. Peter Lang. 217.
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  9. Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski (2004). Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life. Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex difference (...)
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  10. Martin Voracek & Maryanne L. Fisher (2004). The Birth of a Confounded Idea: The Joys and Pitfalls of Self-Experimentation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):273-274.
    According to Roberts, self-experimentation is a viable tool for idea generation in the behavioral sciences. Here we discuss some limitations of this assertion, as well as particular design and data-analytic shortcomings of his experiments.
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  11. Martin Voracek & Todd K. Shackelford (2002). An Evolutionary Theory of Pain Must Consider Sex Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):474-475.
    According to Williams, human facially expressed pain, and its perception by conspecifics, is generated by evolved mechanisms. We argue that a key variable – sex (male, female) – needs to be considered for a complete theory of pain expression and perception. To illustrate, we cite findings on sex differences in pain and pain perception, and in crying and crying responsiveness.
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