Search results for 'Marvin Frankel' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Howard C. Rachlin & Marvin Frankel (1969). Choice, Rate of Response, and Rate of Gambling. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3p1):444.
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  2.  36
    Howard Rachlin & Marvin Frankel (1997). The Uses of Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):124-125.
    The essence of a mental event such as self-deception lies in its function – its place in the life of an animal. But the function of self-deception corresponds to that of interpersonal deception. Therefore self-deception, contrary to Mele's thesis, is essentially isomorphic with interpersonal deception.
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  3. Fred Frankel, Marvin Levine & David Karpf (1970). Human Discrimination Learning: A Test of the Blank-Trials Assumption. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):342-348.
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  4.  1
    Walter T. Marvin (1901). Marvin, Die Giltigkeit unserer Erkenntnis der objektiven Welt. Kant-Studien 5 (1-3).
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  5. W. T. Marvin (1918). MARVIN, W. T. -The History of European Thought: An Introductory Book. [REVIEW] Mind 27:248.
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  6. Richard Frankel (1998). The Adolescent Psyche: Jungian and Winnicottian Perspectives. Routledge.
    Adolescence is recognised as a turbulent period of human development. Along with the physical changes of puberty, adolescents undergo significant transformations in the way they think, act, feel and perceive the world. The disruption that is manifest in their behaviour is upsetting and often incomprehensible to the adults surrounding them. In _The Adolescent Psyche_ Richard Frankel shows how this unique stage of human development expresses through its traumas and fantasies the adolescent's urge towards self-realization. The impact of contemporary culture (...)
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  7. Boris Frankel (1982). Identifying Dominant Misconceptions of States. Thesis Eleven 4 (1):97-123.
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  8. Mark S. Frankel (1989). Professional Codes: Why, How, and with What Impact? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):109 - 115.
    A tension between the professions' pursuit of autonomy and the public's demand for accountability has led to the development of codes of ethics as both a foundation and guide for professional conduct in the face of morally ambiguous situations. The profession as an institution serves as a normative reference group for individual practitioners and through a code of ethics clarifies, for both its members and outsiders, the norms that ought to govern professional behavior. Three types of codes can be identified (...)
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  9. Garry Marvin (2005). Guest Editor's Introduction: Seeing, Looking, Watching, Observing Nonhuman Animals. Society and Animals 13 (1):1-12.
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  10. Mark S. Frankel (2003). Inheritable Genetic Modification and a Brave New World: Did Huxley Have It Wrong? Hastings Center Report 33 (2):31-36.
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  11. Mark S. Frankel (forthcoming). Scientific Societies as Sentinels of Responsible Research Conduct2 (Msssd). Research Ethics.
     
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  12. Oz Frankel (2003). The Predicament of Racial Knowledge: Government Studies of the Freedmen During the US Civil War. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (1):45-81.
     
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  13. Edwin B. Holt, Walter T. Marvin, William Pepperrell Montague, Ralph Barton Perry, Walter B. Pitkin & Edward Gleason Spaulding (1913). The New Realism: Coöperative Studies in Philosophy. Philosophical Review 22 (1):57-65.
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  14. Jean Jacques Rousseau & Charles Frankel (1948). The Social Contract. Journal of Philosophy 45 (24):666-667.
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  15.  59
    Garry Marvin (2001). Cultured Killers: Creating and Representing Foxhounds. Society and Animals 9 (3):273-292.
    This article concerns the related ideas of "presentation" and "representation" with regard to animals and suggests that the prefix "re" indicates a directing agent with its own concerns about the nature and status of animal presence. It further suggests that the representation of animals is perhaps always an expression of human concerns, desires, and imaginings. As with other domesticated nonhuman animals, foxhounds are not present in the world to fulfill their own purposes but there to fulfill these human desires and (...)
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  16.  50
    Melissa Frankel (2012). Berkeley and God in the Quad. Philosophy Compass 7 (6):388-396.
    In a familiar limerick attributed to Ronald Knox, the narrator asks how a “tree/should continue to be/when there’s no one about in the Quad,” and is subsequently reassured that its continuous existence is guaranteed by God’s being “always about in the Quad” observing it. This is meant to capture Berkeley’s so‐called ‘continuity argument’ for the existence of God, on which the claim that objects exist continuously over time is supposed to entail the existence of a Divine Mind that continuously perceives (...)
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  17. Therese Boos Dykeman, Eve Browning, Judith Chelius Stark, Jane Duran, Marilyn Fischer, Lois Frankel, Edward Fullbrook, Jo Ellen Jacobs, Vicki Harper, Joy Laine, Kate Lindemann, Elizabeth Minnich, Andrea Nye, Margaret Simons, Audun Solli, Catherine Villanueva Gardner, Mary Ellen Waithe, Karen J. Warren & Henry West (eds.) (2008). An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This is a unique, groundbreaking study in the history of philosophy, combining leading men and women philosophers across 2600 years of Western philosophy, covering key foundational topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Introductory essays, primary source readings, and commentaries comprise each chapter to offer a rich and accessible introduction to and evaluation of these vital philosophical contributions. A helpful appendix canvasses an extraordinary number of women philosophers throughout history for further discovery and study.
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  18. Walter T. Marvin (1907). The Nature of Explanation. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (5):113-118.
  19.  18
    Charles Frankel (1948). Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):48-50.
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  20.  8
    Melissa Frankel (forthcoming). Berkeley on the “Twofold State of Things”. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    Berkeley writes in his Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous that he “acknowledge[s] a twofold state of things, the one ectypal or natural, the other archetypal and eternal[.] The former was created in time; the latter existed from everlasting in the mind of God”. On a straightforward reading of this passage, it looks as though Berkeley is an indirect perception theorist, who thinks that our sensory ideas are copies or resemblances of archetypal divine ideas. But this is problematic because Berkeley’s (...)
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  21. Henry Frankel (1976). Harre on Causation. Philosophy of Science 43 (4):560-569.
  22.  90
    Melissa Frankel (2009). Something-We-Know-Not-What, Something-We-Know-Not-Why: Berkeley, Meaning and Minds. Philosophia 37 (3):381-402.
    It is sometimes suggested that Berkeley adheres to an empirical criterion of meaning, on which a term is meaningful just in case it signifies an idea (i.e., an immediate object of perceptual experience). This criterion is thought to underlie his rejection of the term ‘matter’ as meaningless. As is well known, Berkeley thinks that it is impossible to perceive matter. If one cannot perceive matter, then, per Berkeley, one can have no idea of it; if one can have no idea (...)
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  23.  26
    Mark S. Frankel & Stephanie J. Bird (2003). The Role of Scientific Societies in Promoting Research Integrity. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):139-140.
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  24.  18
    Carl Frankel (2001). A Council of Environmental Elders. Business Ethics 15 (2):5-5.
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  25.  28
    Richard M. Frankel, Timothy E. Quill & Susan H. McDaniel (eds.) (2003). The Biopsychosocial Approach: Past, Present, and Future. University of Rochester Press.
    According to the biopsychosocial model, developed by the late Dr. George Engel, how physicians approach patients and the problems they present is very much ...
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  26.  12
    Charles Frankel (1950). Decadence. A Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 47 (22):637-643.
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  27.  12
    Charles Frankel (1950). Essays in Political Theory. Presented to George H. Sabine. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 47 (24):712-717.
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  28.  12
    Charles Frankel (1948). Freedom and Experience. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 45 (13):356-363.
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  29.  12
    Charles Frankel (1948). Studies on Voltaire. With Some Unpublished Papers of Mme. Du Ch'telet. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):105-107.
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  30.  12
    Charles Frankel (1947). The Censoring of Diderot's Encyclopédie and the Re-Established Text. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 44 (26):721-723.
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  31.  11
    Walter T. Marvin (1927). The Making of the Modern Mind. A Survey of the Intellectual Background of the Present Age. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 24 (8):210-212.
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  32.  10
    Charles Frankel (1952). Leviathan and Natural Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 49 (1):24-24.
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  33.  55
    Charles Frankel (1971). Equality of Opportunity. Ethics 81 (3):191-211.
  34.  12
    Henry Frankel (1979). The Career of Continental Drift Theory: An Application of Imre Lakatos' Analysis of Scientific Growth to the Rise of Drift Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 10 (1):21-66.
  35.  13
    T. W. Bynum, R. Chadwick, S. de ChubinClark, R. L. Fischbach, M. S. Frankel, P. A. Gaist, P. J. Gilmer, I. Haiduc & R. D. Hollander (1998). Science and Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):51-64.
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  36.  12
    F. S. Marvin (1928). The Restoration of Science. The Monist 38 (1):1-17.
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  37.  12
    Mark S. Frankel (2009). Private Interests Count Too. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):367-373.
    Along with concerns about the deleterious effects of politically driven government intervention on science are the intrusion of private sector interests into the conduct of research and the reporting of its results. Scientists are generally unprepared for the challenges posed by private interests seeking to advance their economic, political, or ideological agendas. They must educate and prepare themselves for assaults on scientific freedom, not because it is a legal right, but rather because social progress depends on it.
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  38.  10
    Mark Frankel (2008). Book. Philosophy Now 70:43-43.
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  39.  10
    Margherita Frankel (1983). Vico's 'Discovery of the True Homer'. New Vico Studies 1:95-96.
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  40.  10
    Margherita Frankel (1983). Inquiries Into the Origin of Language. New Vico Studies 1:111-112.
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  41.  6
    Boris Frankel (1974). Habermas Talking: An Interview. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 1 (1):37-58.
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  42.  1
    Felice Frankel (2004). Envisioning Science: The Design and Craft of the Science Image. The MIT Press.
    A complete guide to the creation of compelling science photographs.
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  43.  13
    Robert Evans & Simon Marvin, Researching the Sustainable City : Three Modes of Interdisciplinarity.
    In this paper we explore the practice of interdisciplinarity by examining how the UK research councils addressed the problem of the sustainable city during the 1990s. In developing their research programmes, the councils recognised that the problems of the sustainable city transcended conventional disciplinary boundaries and that an interdisciplinary approach was needed. In practice, however, initially radical proposals to research the city as a complex combination of science and technology and society contracted into more cognate collaborations that emphasised either science (...)
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  44.  16
    Lois Frankel (1987). Causation and the Self. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (3):325-327.
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  45.  6
    Boris Frankel (1974). The “Gulag Archipelago” and the Left. Theory and Society 1 (4):477-496.
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  46.  21
    Margot Iverson, Mark S. Frankel & Sanyin Siang (2003). Scientific Societies and Research Integrity: What Are They Doing and How Well Are They Doing It? Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):141-158.
    Scientific societies can play an important role in promoting ethical research practices among their members, and over the past two decades several studies have addressed how societies perform this role. This survey continues this research by examining current efforts by scientific societies to promote research integrity among their members. The data indicate that although many of the societies are working to promote research integrity through ethics codes and activities, they lack rigorous assessment methods to determine the effectiveness of their efforts.
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  47.  41
    Lois Frankel (1986). From a Metaphysical Point of View: Leibniz and the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):321-334.
    The relation between leibniz's logical and his metaphysical views is the subject of much modern scholarship. Some commentators have argued that his metaphysics is based on his logic; others have taken the opposite position. However, Both sides pose the question in terms of 'priority'. On the contrary, I argue that it is likely that leibniz means the psr to play "both" a logical and a metaphysical role. The ambiguity of leibniz's psr indicates that he equates the metaphysical notion of causation (...)
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  48.  8
    Mark Frankel (2012). A Philosophy of Boredom. Philosophy Now 89:42-43.
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  49.  18
    Melissa Frankel (2013). Acts, Ideas, and Objects in Berkeley's Metaphysics. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):475-493.
    Berkeley holds that objects in the world are constituted of ideas. Some commentators argue that for Berkeley, ideas are identical to acts of perception; this is taken to proceed from his view that ideas are like pains. In this paper, I evaluate the identity claim. I argue that although it does not follow from the pain analogy, nonetheless the texts suggest that Berkeley does think ideas and acts are identical. I show how Berkeley can account for objects persisting over time (...)
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  50.  7
    Margherita Frankel (1983). Vico Nelle Origini Dello Storicismo Tedesco. New Vico Studies 1:96-97.
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