Search results for 'Mary Beth Armstrong' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary Beth Armstrong (1990). Professional Ethics and Accounting Education. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (1/2):181-191.score: 290.0
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  2. Mary Beth Armstrong (1994). Confidentiality. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 3 (1):71-88.score: 290.0
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  3. D. M. Armstrong, John Bacon, Keith Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) (1993). Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays in Honor of D.M. Armstrong. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    D.M. Armstrong is an eminent Australian philosopher whose work over many years has dealt with such subjects as: the nature of possibility, concepts of the particular and the general, causes and laws of nature, and the nature of human consciousness. This collection of essays, all specially written for this volume, explore the many facets of Armstrong's work, concentrating on his more recent interests. There are four sections to the book: possibility and identity, universals, laws and causality, philosophy of (...)
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  4. Elizabeth A. Armstrong & Mary Bernstein (2008). Culture, Power, and Institutions: A Multi-Institutional Politics Approach to Social Movements. Sociological Theory 26 (1):74 - 99.score: 120.0
    We argue that critiques of political process theory are beginning to coalesce into new approach to social movements--a "multi-institutional politics" approach. While the political process model assumes that domination is organized by and around one source of power, the alternative perspective views domination as organized around multiple sources of power, each of which is simultaneously material and symbolic. We examine the conceptions of social movements, politics, actors, goals, and strategies supported by each model, demonstrating that the view of society and (...)
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  5. C. S. J. Ingham & Mary Beth (2010). World as Word. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (1):146-148.score: 120.0
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  6. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.score: 120.0
     
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  7. D. M. Armstrong (1996). Place and Armstrong's Views Compared. In Tim Crane (ed.), Dispositions: A Debate. New York: Routledge. 33--48.score: 120.0
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  8. C. S. J. Ingham & Mary Beth (2010). Duns Scotus, Morality and Happiness. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (2):173-195.score: 120.0
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  9. P. Simons, S. Mumford & D. Armstrong (2005). Critical Discussion of David Armstrong, Truth and Truthmakers. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):253.score: 120.0
     
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  10. David M. Armstrong (1959). Mr Arthadeva and Naive Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (May):67-70.score: 90.0
  11. David M. Armstrong (1963). Max Deutscher and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (August):246-249.score: 90.0
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  12. David M. Armstrong (1964). Vesey on Bodily Sensations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (August):247-248.score: 90.0
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  13. David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.score: 90.0
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  14. Alison Stone, Unthought Nature : Reply to Penelope Deutscher and Mary Beth Mader.score: 42.0
    In response to Mader's and Deutscher's questions, the author defends her approach to reading Irigaray and Butler, which entails extending the ideas of these thinkers into areas of thought with which they do not engage directly themselves. This involves relating Irigaray's ideas to the tradition of the philosophy of nature and interpreting Butler as offering, in spite of her focus on the genealogy of claims about sex, also a theory of sex itself, a theory of sex as an effect entirely (...)
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  15. Sally J. Scholz (2007). Simone de Beauvoir: Philosophical Writings Edited by Margaret A. Simons with Marybeth Timmermann and Mary Beth Mader. Hypatia 22 (3):197-201.score: 42.0
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  16. Stella Sandford (2005). Book Review Of: Simone de Beauvoir, Edited by Margaret A Simons with Marybeth Timmerman and Mary Beth Mader. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 133:52-55.score: 42.0
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  17. Chris Schabel (2006). Mary Beth Ingham and Mechthild Dreyer, The Philosophical Vision of John Duns Scotus: An Introduction. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2004. Pp. Xi, 228. $39.95 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (2):539-540.score: 42.0
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  18. C. J. Davies (2012). Sleights of Reason: Norm, Bisexuality, Development by Mary Beth Mader (Review). Philosophia 2 (2):224-228.score: 42.0
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  19. Joseph Palermo (1991). Mary B. Speer, Ed.,“Le Roman des Sept Sages de Rome”: A Critical Edition of the Two Verse Redactions of a Twelfth-Century Romance.(Edward C. Armstrong Monographs on Medieval Literature, 4.) Lexington, Ky.: French Forum, 1989. Paper. Pp. 398; 3 Black-and-White Facsimile Plates. $24.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (1):239-242.score: 36.0
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  20. Mary Beth Ingham & Mechthild Dreyer (2004). The Philosophical Vision of John Duns Scotus: An Introduction. Review of Metaphysics 2 (234).score: 28.0
    In this much-anticipated work, distinguished authors Mary Beth Ingham and Mechthild Dreyer present an accessible introduction to the philosophy of the thirteenth century Franciscan John Duns Scotus. Based on their expert knowledge of Scotus, this text brings together key insights of Scotus's theory of cognition, metaphysics, and ethics in a comprehensive and unified manner. The authors use critical texts and the most recent scholarship on Scotus to introduce the intricate vision of the Subtle Doctor to a wide audience. (...)
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  21. Jonathan Smith (2010). On Sinnott-Armstrong's Case Against Moral Intuitionism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):75 - 88.score: 18.0
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong has argued against moral intuitionism, according to which some of our moral beliefs are justified without needing to be inferred from any other beliefs. He claims that any prima facie justification some non-inferred moral beliefs might have enjoyed is removed because many of our moral beliefs are formed in circumstances where either (1) we are partial, (2) others disagree with us and there is no reason to prefer our moral judgement to theirs, (3) we are emotional in (...)
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  22. Alexander Bird (2005). The Ultimate Argument Against Armstrong's Contingent Necessitation View of Laws. Analysis 65 (286):147-55.score: 18.0
    I show that Armstrong’s view of laws as second-order contingent relations of ‘necessitation’ among categorical properties faces a dilemma. The necessitation relation confers a relation of extensional inclusion (‘constant conjunction’) on its relata. It does so either necessarily or contingently. If necessarily, it is not a categorical relation (in the relevant sense). If contingently, then an explanation is required of how it confers extensional inclusion. That explanation will need to appeal to a third-order relation between necessitation and extensional inclusion. (...)
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  23. Jennifer McRobert, Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.score: 18.0
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
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  24. D. G. B. J. Dieks (2011). E. W. Beth as a Philosopher of Physics. Synthese 179 (2):271 - 284.score: 18.0
    This paper examines E. W. Beth's work in the philosophy of physics, both from a historical and a systematic point of view. Beth saw the philosophy of physics first of all as an opportunity to illustrate and promulgate a new and modern general approach to the philosophy of nature and to philosophy tout court: an approach characterized negatively by its rejection of all traditional metaphysics and positively by its firm orientation towards science. Beth was successful in defending (...)
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  25. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.score: 18.0
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  26. Javier Kalhat (2008). A Critique of Armstrong's Truthmaking Account of Possibility. Acta Analytica 23 (2):161-176.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue against Armstrong’s recent truthmaking account of possibility. I show that the truthmaking account presupposes modality in a number of different ways, and consequently that it is incapable of underwriting a genuine reduction of modality. I also argue that Armstrong’s account faces serious difficulties irrespective of the question of reduction; in particular, I argue that his Entailment and Possibility Principles are both false.
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  27. Daniel von Wachter (2004). The Ontological Turn Misunderstood: How to Misunderstand David Armstrong’s Theory of Possibility. Metaphysica 5:105-114.score: 18.0
    This article argues that there is a great divide between semantics and metaphysics. Much of what is called metaphysics today is still stuck in the linguistic turn. This is illustrated by showing how Fraser MacBride misunderstands David Armstrong's theory of modality.
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  28. Mark T. Nelson (2003). Sinnott–Armstrong's Moral Scepticism. Ratio 16 (1):63–82.score: 18.0
    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong's recent defense of moral skepticism raises the debate to a new level, but I argue that it is unsatisfactory because of problems with its assumption of global skepticism, with its use of the Skeptical Hypothesis Argument, and with its use of the idea of contrast classes and the correlative distinction between "everyday" justification and "philosophical" justification. I draw on Chisholm's treatment of the Problem of the Criterion to show that my claim that I know that, e.g., baby-torture (...)
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  29. Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):377 - 391.score: 18.0
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
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  30. Mary Magada-Ward (2007). If Men Could Get Pregnant: Beth Singer and Carol Gilligan on Abortion. Metaphilosophy 38 (4):421-430.score: 18.0
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  31. Diana Barnes (2012). The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation. Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.score: 18.0

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
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  32. Rohit Parikh (2011). Beth Definability, Interpolation and Language Splitting. Synthese 179 (2):211 - 221.score: 18.0
    Both the Beth definability theorem and Craig's lemma (interpolation theorem from now on) deal with the issue of the entanglement of one language L1 with another language L2, that is to say, information transfer—or the lack of such transfer—between the two languages. The notion of splitting we study below looks into this issue. We briefly relate our own results in this area as well as the results of other researchers like Kourousias and Makinson, and Peppas, Chopra and Foo.Section 3 (...)
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  33. Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.score: 18.0
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  34. Thomas Nagel (1970). Armstrong on the Mind. Philosophical Review 79 (July):394-403.score: 15.0
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  35. Markku Keinänen (2008). Armstrong's Conception of Supervenience. In Tim de Mey & Markku Keinänen (eds.), Problems From Armstrong. Acta Philosophica Fennica 84. 51.score: 15.0
    In this article, I will focus on the notion of supervenience introduced and deployed by Armstrong. The aim is to settle the issue of whether it has any fruitful applications. My conclusions are negative. Armstrong gives to his notion of supervenience a major explanatory role of telling why one need not consider certain beings as a genuine ontic expansion, if one already assumes a certain meagre set of more basic entities. On closer inspection, however, Armstrong’s notion does (...)
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  36. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.score: 15.0
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  37. K. Campbell (1993). David Armstrong and Realism About Colour. In John Bacon, K. Campbell & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.), Ontology, Causality, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
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  38. Max Deutscher (1963). David Armstrong and Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (May):80-88.score: 15.0
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  39. Howard M. Robinson (1972). Professor Armstrong on 'Non-Physical Sensory Items'. Mind 81 (January):84-86.score: 15.0
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  40. Max O. Hocutt (1974). Armstrong and Strawson on 'Disembodied Existence'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (September):46-59.score: 15.0
  41. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1964). Armstrong on Bodily Sensations. [REVIEW] Philosophy 39 (April):177-181.score: 15.0
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  42. George F. Englebretsen (1972). Armstrong on Disembodied Minds. Dialogue 11 (December):576-579.score: 15.0
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  43. David R. Hiley (1973). Armstrong's Concept of a Mental State. Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-2):113-118.score: 15.0
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  44. Ingvar Johansson (2002). Critical Notice of Armstrong's and Lewis' Concepts of Supervenience. SATS 3 (1):118-122.score: 15.0
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  45. Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.score: 15.0
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It (...)
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  46. John A. Foster (2004). Reply to Armstrong. Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):27-28.score: 15.0
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  47. John O. Nelson (1964). An Examination of D M Armstrong's Theory of Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (April):154-160.score: 15.0
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  48. Michael P. Hodges (1979). Armstrong's Causal Analysis and Direct Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):335-343.score: 15.0
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  49. Robert Kirk (1971). Armstrong's Analogue of Introspection. Philosophical Quarterly 21 (April):158-62.score: 15.0
  50. George A. Sher (1977). Armstrong and the Interdependence of the Mental. Philosophical Quarterly 27 (July):227-235.score: 15.0
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