22 found
Order:
  1.  30
    Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.) (2010). Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court.
    Addressing a wide range of topics, from Newton to Post-Kuhnian philosophy of science, these essays critically examine themes that have been central to the influential work of philosopher Michael Friedman.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2.  60
    Mary Domski (2010). Newton's Empiricism and Metaphysics. Philosophy Compass 5 (7):525-534.
    Commentators attempting to understand the empirical method that Isaac Newton applies in his Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687) are forced to grapple with the thorny issue of how to reconcile Newton's rejection of hypotheses with his appeal to absolute space. On the one hand, Newton claims that his experimental philosophy does not rely on claims that are assumed without empirical evidence, and on the other hand, Newton appeals to an absolute space that, by his own characterization, does not make (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3.  17
    Mary Domski (2012). Newton and Proclus: Geometry, Imagination, and Knowing Space. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):389-413.
    I aim to clarify the argument for space that Newton presents in De Gravitatione (composed prior to 1687) by putting Newton's remarks into conversation with the account of geometrical knowledge found in Proclus's Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements (ca. 450). What I highlight is that both Newton and Proclus adopt an epistemic progression (or “order of knowing”) according to which geometrical knowledge necessarily precedes our knowledge of metaphysical truths concerning the ontological state of affairs. As I argue, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  10
    Mary Domski (2016). Space, Geometry and Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories by Thomas C. Vinci. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):174-175.
    Those familiar with the Critique of Pure Reason will not at all be surprised that Thomas C. Vinci has found it fitting to dedicate an entire book to the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories, a chapter of the CPR that is as important to Kant’s argument for Transcendental Idealism as it is difficult to decipher. The purpose of that section is to establish the objective validity of the categories—to show, that is, that the pure concepts of the understanding apply to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  22
    Mary Domski (2003). The Constructible and the Intelligible in Newton's Philosophy of Geometry. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1114-1124.
    In the Preface to the Principia (1687) Newton famously states that “geometry is founded on mechanical practice”. Several commentators have taken this and similar remarks as an indication that Newton was firmly situated in the constructivist tradition of geometry that was prevalent in the seventeenth century. By drawing on a selection of Newton’s unpublished texts, I hope to show the faults of such an interpretation. In these texts, Newton not only rejects the constructivism that took its birth in Descartes’ Géométrie (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  6.  75
    Mary Domski (2010). Kant on the Imagination and Geometrical Certainty. Perspectives on Science 18 (4):409-431.
    My goal in this paper is to develop our understanding of the role the imagination plays in Kant’s Critical account of geometry, and I do so by attending to how the imagination factors into the method of reasoning Kant assigns the geometer in the First Critique. Such an approach is not unto itself novel. Recent commentators, such as Friedman (1992) and Young (1992), have taken a careful look at the constructions of the productive imagination in pure intuition and highlighted the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  41
    Mary Domski (2003). The Constructible and the Intelligible in Newton's Philosophy of Geometry. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1114-1124.
    In the preface to the Principia (1687) Newton famously states that “geometry is founded on mechanical practice.” Several commentators have taken this and similar remarks as an indication that Newton was firmly situated in the constructivist tradition of geometry that was prevalent in the seventeenth century. By drawing on a selection of Newton's unpublished texts, I hope to show the faults of such an interpretation. In these texts, Newton not only rejects the constructivism that took its birth in Descartes's Géométrie (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (2010). Discourse on a New Method, or a Manifesto for a Synthetic Approach to History and Philosophy of Science. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court
  9.  26
    Mary Domski (2013). Kant and Newton on the a Priori Necessity of Geometry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):438-447.
  10. Mary Domski (2008). The Transcendental and the Geometrical: Kant's Argument for the Infinity of Space. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra, Guido A. de Almeida & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Law and Peace in Kant's Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  49
    Mary Domski, The God of Matter, the God of Geometry: The Connection Between Descartes' Math and Metaphysics.
    Building on the work of Henk Bos and John Schuster, I will examine how the story of Descartes-the-philosopher and Descartes-the-mathematician proceeds in the years immediately following 1628. Specifically, I will focus on the 1633 Le Monde and the 1637 Geometry and hope to show that Descartes is still trying in this period to integrate his distinctively Cartesian version of math with his distinctively Cartesian version of philosophy. Being even more specific, I will look at the creation story presented in Le (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  7
    Mary Domski (2013). Putting the Pieces Back Together Again: Reading Newton's Principia Through Newton's Method. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):318-333.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  17
    Mary Domski (2009). Newton as Philosopher. Early Science and Medicine 14 (4):590-592.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Mary Domski (2006). Construction Without Spatial Constraints: A Reply to Emily Carson. Locke Studies 6:85-99.
  15.  14
    Mary Domski (forthcoming). Descartes' Mathematics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  17
    Mary Domski (2009). The Intelligibility of Motion and Construction: Descartes' Early Mathematics and Metaphysics, 1619–1637. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):119-130.
    I argue for an interpretation of the connection between Descartes’ early mathematics and metaphysics that centers on the standard of geometrical intelligibility that characterizes Descartes’ mathematical work during the period 1619 to 1637. This approach remains sensitive to the innovations of Descartes’ system of geometry and, I claim, sheds important light on the relationship between his landmark Geometry and his first metaphysics of nature, which is presented in Le monde . In particular, I argue that the same standard of clear (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Mary Domski (2012). Introduction: “Newton and Newtonianism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):363-369.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  5
    Mary Domski (2013). Observation and Mathematics. In Peter R. Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press 144.
  19.  2
    Mary Domski (2011). Peter Machamer and J. E. McGuire.Descartes’s Changing Mind. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. Pp. Xi+258. $39.50. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):162-165.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Mary Domski (2003). Geometry and Experimental Method in Locke, Newton and Kant. Dissertation, Indiana University
    Historians of modern philosophy have been paying increasing attention to contemporaneous scientific developments. Isaac Newton's Principia is of course crucial to any discussion of the influence of scientific advances on the philosophical currents of the modern period, and two philosophers who have been linked especially closely to Newton are John Locke and Immanuel Kant. My dissertation aims to shed new light on the ties each shared with Newtonian science by treating Newton, Locke, and Kant simultaneously. I adopt Newton's philosophy of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Mary Domski (2004). Lorenzo Magnani: Philosophy and Geometry: Theoretical and Historical Issues. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 71 (3):412-415.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Mary Domski (2010). Newton as Historically-Minded Philosopher. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography