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  1. Mary I. Bockover (2012). Confucian Ritual as Body Language of Self, Society, and Spirit. Sophia 51 (2):177-194.
    This article explains how li 禮 or ‘ritual propriety’ is the ‘body language’ of ren 仁 or the authentic expression of our humanity. Li and ren are interdependent aspects of a larger creative human way (rendao 仁道) that can be conceptually distinguished as follows: li refers to the ritualized social form of appropriate conduct and ren to the more general, authentically human spirit this expresses. Li is the social instrument for self-cultivation and the vehicle of harmonious human interaction. More, li (...)
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  2. Mary I. Bockover (2010). Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Foundational Concepts. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):307-316.
    Confucianism conceives of persons as being necessarily interdependent, defining personhood in terms of the various roles one embodies and that are established by the relationships basic to one's life. By way of contrast, the Western philosophical tradition has predominantly defined persons in terms of intrinsic characteristics not thought to depend on others. This more strictly and explicitly individualistic concept of personhood contrasts with the Confucian idea that one becomes a person because of others; where one is never a person independently (...)
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  3. Mary I. Bockover (2010). Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition II: A Comparative Analysis of Personhood. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):317-325.
    This Philosophy Compass article continues the comparison between Confucian and mainstream Western views of personhood and their connection with ethics begun in Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Fundamental Concepts , by focusing on the Western self conceived as an independent agent with moral and political rights. More specifically, the present article briefly accounts for how the more strictly and explicitly individualistic notion of self dominating Western philosophy has developed, leading up to a recent debate in modern (...)
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  4. Donald N. Blakeley, Mary I. Bockover & Guangwei Ouyang (2003). Science, Technology, and Chinese Philosophy:(Continued). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):137-193.
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  5. Mary I. Bockover (2003). Confucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflict. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):159–175.