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Profile: Mary Jean Walker (Macquarie University, Charles Sturt University)
  1. Mary Jean Walker & Wendy Rogers (2014). What Can Feminist Epistemology Do for Surgery? Hypatia 29 (2):404-421.
    Surgery is an important part of contemporary health care, but currently much of surgery lacks a strong evidence base. Uptake of evidence-based medicine (EBM) methods within surgical research and among practitioners has been slow compared with other areas of medicine. Although this is often viewed as arising from practical and cultural barriers, it also reflects a lack of epistemic fit between EBM research methods and surgical practice. In this paper we discuss some epistemic challenges in surgery relating to this lack (...)
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  2. Mary Jean Walker, Wendy A. Rogers & Vikki Entwistle (2014). Ethical Justifications for Access to Unapproved Medical Interventions: An Argument for (Limited) Patient Obligations. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):3-15.
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  3. Mary Jean Walker, Wendy A. Rogers & Vikki Entwistle (2014). Special Access Programs Warrant Further Critical Attention: Authors' Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Ethical Justifications for Access to Unapproved Medical Interventions: An Argument for (Limited) Patient Obligations”. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):1-2.
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  4. Mary Jean Walker (2012). Neuroscience, Self-Understanding, and Narrative Truth. AJOB Neuroscience 3 (4):63-74.
    Recent evidence from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences provides some support for a narrative theory of self-understanding. However, it also suggests that narrative self-understanding is unlikely to be accurate, and challenges its claims to truth. This article examines a range of this empirical evidence, explaining how it supports a narrative theory of self-understanding while raising questions of these narrative's accuracy and veridicality. I argue that this evidence does not provide sufficient reason to dismiss the possibility of truth in narrative self-understanding. (...)
     
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  5. Mary Jean Walker (2010). Addiction and Self-Deception: A Method for Self-Control? Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):305-319.
    Neil Levy argues that while addicts who believe they are not addicts are self-deceived, addicts who believe they are addicts are just as self-deceived. Such persons accept a false belief that their addictive behaviour involves a loss of control. This paper examines two implications of Levy's discussion: that accurate self-knowledge may be particularly difficult for addicts; and that an addict's self-deceived belief that they cannot control themselves may aid their attempts at self-control. I argue that the self-deceived beliefs of addicts (...)
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