Search results for 'Mary Jeanne Welsh' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan C. Borkowski & Mary Jeanne Welsh (2000). Ethical Practice in the Accounting Publishing Process: Contrasting Opinions of Authors and Editors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):15 - 31.score: 870.0
    Academic accounting researchers often offer anecdotal evidence that the publishing process is rife with unfair and unethical practices, and similar contradictory evidence supports accounting journal editors' claims that the process is fair and ethical. This study compares the perceptions of accounting authors and editors on the ethicacy and frequency of specific author, editor and reviewer practices. Both authors and editors are in general agreement about the ethical nature of editors and author practices. However, there are significant differences between the groups (...)
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  2. Susan C. Borkowski & Mary Jeanne Welsh (1998). Ethics and the Accounting Publishing Process: Author, Reviewer, and Editor Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (16):1785-1803.score: 870.0
    Are codes of ethics needed to guide author, reviewer and editor publishing practices in accounting journals? What practices are considered unethical, and to what extend do they occur? A survey of ninety-five journal editors who publish accounting articles rated author, reviewer and editor practices as ethical or unethical, and estimated the frequency with which these practices occur. Respondents also commented on current publishing practices regarding the double-blind review process, payments for reviews, confirmatory bias, and whether codes of ethics are needed (...)
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  3. Monique Deveaux (1994). Mary Jeanne Larrabee, Ed., An Ethic of Care Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (4):272-274.score: 140.0
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  4. A. Seller (forthcoming). Mary Jeanne Larrabee (Ed.), An Ethic of Care: Feminist and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Radical Philosophy.score: 140.0
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  5. Marc Angenot, Thomas Bloor, Meriel Bloor, Paul Buckley, F. David Peat, Sanford Budick, Wolfgang Iser, A. G. Cairns-Smith, Carmen Rosa Caldas-Coulthard & Malcolm Coulthard (1997). Adam, Jean-Michel; Borel, Marie-Jeanne; Calame, Claude; and Kilani, Mondher, Le Dis-Cours Anthropologique: Description, Narration, Savoir (Nouvelle Edition Revue Et Augmentee)(= Sciences Humaines). Lausanne: Editions Payot Lausanne, 1995. Allert, Beate (Ed.), Languages of Visuality: Crossings Between Science, Art, Politics, and Literature (= Kritik: German Literary Theory and Cultural Studies). Detroit: Wayne State. [REVIEW] Semiotica 115 (3/4):401-404.score: 56.7
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  6. Mathilde Dubesset, Donna Singles, Renée Dufourt & Michelle Martin-Grünenwald (2002). Marie-Jeanne Bérère, théologienne catholique, et la question des femmes dans l'Eglise. Clio 15:199-207.score: 56.7
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  7. Robert C. Ulin (1999). Critical Anthropology Through'constructivist'discourse: From Epistemology to Politics (Jean-Michel Adam, Marie-Jeanne Borel, Claude Calame, and Mondher Kilani, Le'Discours Anthropologique. Description, Narration, Savoir'). Semiotica 124 (1-2):137-152.score: 56.7
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  8. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (ed.) (1992). An Ethic of Care: Feminist and Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Routledge.score: 56.0
    Published in 1982, Carol Gilligan's In a Different Voice proposed a new model of moral reasoning based on care, arguing that it better described the moral life of women. An Ethic of Care is the first volume to bring together key contributions to the extensive debate engaging Gilligan's work. It provides the highlights of the often impassioned discussion of the ethic of care, drawing on the literature of the wide range of disciplines that have entered into the debate. Contributors: Annette (...)
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  9. Daniel Williman (2003). Jeanne Vielliard, Ed., with Marie-Henriette Jullien de Pommerol, Le Registre de Prêt de la Bibliothèque du Collège de Sorbonne [1402–1536]: “Diarium Bibliothecae Sorbonae,” Paris, Bibliothèque Mazarine, Ms. 3323. Preface by Jacques Monfrin. (Documents, Etudes Et Répertoires, 57; Histoire des Bibliothèques Médiévales, 8.) Paris: CNRS, 2000. Pp. 817 Plus Black-and-White Facsimiles; Tables.Monique Peyrafort-Huin, with Patricia Stirnemann and a Contribution by Jean-Luc Benoit, La Bibliothèque Médiévale de l'Abbaye de Pontigny (XIIe–XIXe Siècles): Histoire, Inventaires Anciens, Manuscrits. (Documents, Etudes Et Répertoires, 60; Histoire des Bibliothèques Médiévales, 11.) Paris: CNRS, 2001. Pp. 846; 58 Black-and-White Plates, Black-and-White Figures, and Tables.Anne Chalandon, Les Bibliothèques des Ecclésiastiques de Troyes du XIVe au XVIe Siècle. (Documents, Etudes Et Répertoires, 68.) Paris: CNRS, 2001. Pp. 156; Tables. €34. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):1012-1013.score: 50.0
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  10. Daniel Williman (2003). Jeanne Vielliard, Ed., with Marie-Henriette Jullien de Pommerol, Le Registre de Prêt de la Bibliothèque du Collège de Sorbonne [1402–1536]:“Diarium Bibliothecae Sorbonae,” Paris, Bibliothèque Mazarine, Ms. 3323. Preface by Jacques Monfrin.(Documents, Etudes Et Répertoires, 57; Histoire des Bibliothèques Médiévales, 8.) Paris: CNRS, 2000. Pp. 817 Plus Black-and-White Facsimiles; Tables. Monique Peyrafort-Huin, with Patricia Stirnemann and a Contribution by Jean-Luc Benoit, La Bibliothèque Médiévale de L ... [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (3):1012-1013.score: 50.0
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  11. Mary Edith (1951). Jeanne d'Arc (Review). Franciscan Studies 11 (1):104-107.score: 36.0
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  12. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1986). The Noema in Husserl's Phenomenology. Husserl Studies 3 (3):209-230.score: 28.0
    Husserl's theory of the noema has precipitated much controversy, Especially following follesdal's 1969 paper, Yet many issues remain unsolved. This paper outlines aspects of method and experience relevant to a theory of noema, Describes various uses of the term 'noema' and thus sorts out two different levels of usage, And shows how this interpretation avoids difficulties raised by other commentators, Particularly in regard to maintaining a clear distinction between perceptual and linguistic experiences and their correlative noemata.
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  13. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1995). The Time of Trauma: Husserl's Phenomenology and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. [REVIEW] Human Studies 18 (4):351 - 366.score: 28.0
    The phenomenology of inner temporalizing developed by Edmund Husserl provides a helpful framework for understanding a type of experiencing that can be part of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). My paper extrapolates hints from Husserl's work in order to describe those memories — flashbacks — that come so strongly to consciousness as to overtake the experiencer. Husserl's work offers several clues: his view of inner temporalization by which conscious experiences flow in both a serial and a nonserial manner; a characterization (...)
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  14. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1976). Husserl's Static and Genetic Phenomenology. Man and World 9 (2):163-174.score: 28.0
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  15. Mary Jeanne Larrabee, Michael Goldman & Robert J. Dostal (1985). Book Reviews. John Sallis (Ed.): 'Husserl and Contemporary Thought'. Patrick A. Heelan: 'Space-Perception and the Philosophy of Science'. Ernst Orth (Ed.): 'Zeit Und Zeitlichkeit Bei Husserl Und Heidegger (Phanomenologische Forschungen, Volume 14)'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 2 (1).score: 28.0
    Husserl and Contemporary Thought contains twelve essays that address certain key themes in Husserl's thought, each in some way confronting issues critical to the Husserlian project. The essays first appeared in the 1982 volume of Research in Phenornenology. The "contemporary thought" in the title should be understood in a limited sense as refer- ring to certain strains of thinking pursued in the present decade, build- ing however on past research. The volume shows several directions in which contemporary thinkers are taking (...)
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  16. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1983). Feminism and Parental Roles Possibilities for Change. Journal of Social Philosophy 14 (2):18-30.score: 28.0
  17. Brenda Ray, Colin Jackson, Elizabeth Ducat, Ann Ho, Sara Hamon & Mary Jeanne Kreek (2011). Effect of Ethnicity, Gender and Drug Use History on Achieving High Rates of Affirmative Informed Consent for Genetics Research: Impact of Sharing with a National Repository. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):374-379.score: 28.0
    Aim Genetic research representative of the population is crucial to understanding the underlying causes of many diseases. In a prospective evaluation of informed consent we assessed the willingness of individuals of different ethnicities, gender and drug dependence history to participate in genetic studies in which their genetic sample could be shared with a repository at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Potential subjects were recruited from the general population through the use of flyers and referrals from previous participants and clinicians (...)
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  18. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1990). The Contexts of Phenomenology as Theory. Human Studies 13 (3):195 - 208.score: 28.0
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  19. Mary Jeanne[from old catalog] File (1958). A Critical Analysis of Current Concepts of Art in American Higher Education. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 28.0
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  20. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1982). Things and God. New Scholasticism 56 (3):323-328.score: 28.0
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  21. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1997). The Cambridge Companion to Husserl. Philosophical Review 106 (2):283-286.score: 28.0
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  22. Jennifer McRobert, Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.score: 24.0
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
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  23. Brian Bruya (ed.) (2010). Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    This is the first book to explore the cognitive science of effortless attention and action. Attention and action are generally understood to require effort, and the expectation is that under normal circumstances effort increases to meet rising demand. Sometimes, however, attention and action seem to flow effortlessly despite high demand. Effortless attention and action have been documented across a range of normal activities--from rock climbing to chess playing--and yet fundamental questions about the cognitive science of effortlessness have gone largely unasked. (...)
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  24. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.score: 24.0
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  25. Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):377 - 391.score: 24.0
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
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  26. Mary Devereaux & Jeanne Loring (2010). A Modest Proposal in Response to Rhodes and Schiano. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):20-22.score: 24.0
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  27. Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus (1994). Rights to Privacy in Research: Adolescents Versus Parents. Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):109 – 121.score: 24.0
    Conducting research on adolescents raises a number of ethical issues not often confronted in research on younger children. In part, these differences are due to the fact that although assent is usually not an issue, given cognitive and social competencies, the life situations and behavior of youth make it more difficult to balance rights and privacy of the adolescents. In this article, the three ethical principles of beneficence, justice, and respect for persons are discussed in terms of their application to (...)
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  28. Mary Devereaux & Jeanne Loring (2010). Growth of an Industry: How U.S. Scientists and Clinicians Have Enabled Stem Cell Tourism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):45-46.score: 24.0
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  29. Steven J. Ralston, Monique A. Spillman, Mary F. Mitchell, Jeanne Mahoney & Gerald F. Joseph (2011). Obstetricians: Women's Advocates, Not Adversaries. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):57-59.score: 24.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 12, Page 57-59, December 2011.
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  30. Diana Barnes (2012). The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation. Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.score: 24.0

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
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  31. Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.score: 24.0
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  32. Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.) (2011). Educational Neuroscience. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors.1. Introduction: Educational Neuroscience (Kathryn E. Patten and Stephen R. Campbell).2. Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, methodology, and implications (Stephen R. Campbell).3. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning? (Anthony E. Kelly).4. A Multiperspective Approach to Neuroeducational Research (Paul A. Howard-Jones).5. What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education? (Michel Ferrari).6. Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where will the journey take us? (Daniel Ansar1, Donna Coch and Bert De Smedt).7. Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications (...)
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  33. Venita Datta (2006). Sur les Boulevards : Les représentations de Jeanne d'Arc dans le théâtre populaire. Clio 2:125-147.score: 24.0
    Dans cet article, nous nous proposons d’examiner la représentation de Jeanne d’Arc au théâtre de boulevard, à partir des deux pièces de la fin de siècle les plus connues sur le sujet: « Jeanne d’Arc » : l’une de Jules Barbier (avec une musique de Gounod, montée en 1890 au Théâtre de la Porte-Saint-Martin, avec Sarah Bernhardt dans le rôle de Jeanne), l’autre étant « Le Procès de Jeanne d’Arc » d’Émile Moreau (représentée au Théâtre Sarah-Bernhardt (...)
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  34. Julie Deramond (2007). Jeanne d'Arc et ses voix, dans deux opéras, Verdi et Honneger. Clio 1:115-132.score: 24.0
    Dès le début du xixe siècle, Jeanne d’Arc connaît la célébrité dans toute l’Europe. Élevée au pinacle, installée au panthéon des Français, elle devient un sujet en or pour les compositeurs et leurs librettistes, parce qu’elle permet d’aborder les thèmes les plus divers, de l’héroïque au religieux en passant par le pastoral et le tragique. Elle fait l’objet de nombreuses mises en scène dans des genres musicaux aussi variés que l’opéra, l’opéra-comique, le ballet, la mélodie, la pantomime ou le (...)
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  35. Mary Cipriano Silva & Jeanne Merckle Sorrell (forthcoming). Enhancing Comprehension of Information for Informed Consent: A Review of Empirical Research. [REVIEW] Irb.score: 24.0
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  36. Isabelle VahÉ (2006). Entre ombres et lumières, le parcours singulier d'une féministe pacifiste, Jeanne Mélin (1877-1964). Clio 2:231-250.score: 24.0
    L’intérêt de ma thèse est d’étudier les relations entre le féminisme et le pacifisme en France au XXe siècle, sous l’angle de la biographie de Jeanne Mélin (1877-1964), pacifiste, féministe, écrivaine. Le sens de cette recherche est de souligner l’ambiguïté de la mise en perspective par Jeanne Mélin du féminisme et du pacifisme, d’étudier son appropriation des concepts d’identité féminine, de masculinité et de différence des sexes. Selon elle, le droit de vote féminin est avant tout le sésame (...)
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  37. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.score: 21.0
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  38. Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It (...)
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  39. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2013). Mary Mahowald: Removing Blinders and Crossing Boundaries. The Pluralist 8 (3):114-121.score: 21.0
    In what follows I will briefly address (1) Mahowald's work on Josiah Royce, (2) her advocacy for "cultural feminism" and its implications for American philosophy and work still to be done, (3) her promotion of a critical pragmatism and the need to provide a pragmatist critique not only of gender injustice but all forms of injustice, and (4) Mahowald's argument for the strategy of "standpoint theory," a strategy that offers great promise for future work in American philosophy.
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  40. Gabriel Andrade (2004). Metáforas No Verbales: En Torna a Mary Douglas y Claude Lévi-Strauss. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (25):99-120.score: 21.0
    This ar ti cle ex tends, from a philo soph i cal and an thro po log i cal point of view, the re cent dis - cus sions as to what is met a phoric. Lan guage phi - los o phers have con trib uted to the un der stand ing of the na ture and func tion of met a phors, but their com ments have been tra ..
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  41. Luca Malatesti (2008). Mary's Scientific Knowledge. Prolegomena 7 (1):37-59.score: 18.0
    Frank Jackson’s knowledge argument (KA) aims to prove, by means of a thought experiment concerning the hypothetical scientist Mary, that conscious experiences have non-physical properties, called qualia. Mary has complete scientific knowledge of colours and colour vision without having had any colour experience. The central intuition in the KA is that, by seeing colours, Mary will learn what it is like to have colour experiences. Therefore, her scientific knowledge is incomplete, and conscious experiences have qualia. In this (...)
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  42. Robert van Gulick (2004). So Many Ways of Saying No to Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Yujin Nagasawa & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument. MIT Press.score: 18.0
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  43. Cynthia Macdonald (2004). Mary Meets Molyneux: The Explanatory Gap and the Individuation of Phenomenal Concepts. Noûs 38 (3):503-24.score: 18.0
    It is widely accepted that physicalism faces its most serious challenge when it comes to making room for the phenomenal character of psychological experience, its so-called what-it-is-like aspect. The challenge has surfaced repeatedly over the past two decades in a variety of forms. In a particularly striking one, Frank Jackson considers a situation in which Mary, a brilliant scientist who knows all the physical facts there are to know about psychological experience, has spent the whole of her life in (...)
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  44. Alex Byrne (2002). Something About Mary. Grazer Philosophische Studien 63 (1):27-52.score: 18.0
    Jackson's black-and-white Mary teaches us that the propositional content of perception cannot be fully expressed in language.
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  45. Robert P. Lovering (2004). Mary Anne Warren on “Full” Moral Status. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):509-530.score: 18.0
    In the contemporary debate on moral status, it is not uncommon to find philosophers who embrace the following basic moral principle: -/- The Principle of Full Moral Status: The degree to which an entity E possesses moral status is proportional to the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties until a threshold degree of morally relevant properties possession is reached, whereupon the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties may continue to increase, but the degree to which E (...)
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  46. Barbara Montero (2007). Physicalism Could Be True Even If Mary Learns Something New. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):176-189.score: 18.0
    Mary knows all there is to know about physics, chemistry and neurophysiology, yet has never experienced colour. Most philosophers think that if Mary learns something genuinely new upon seeing colour for the first time, then physicalism is false. I argue, however, that physicalism is consistent with Mary's acquisition of new information. Indeed, even if she has perfect powers of deduction, and higher-level physical facts are a priori deducible from lower-level ones, Mary may still lack concepts which (...)
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  47. Pete Mandik, Swamp Mary Semantics: A Case for Physicalism Without Gaps.score: 18.0
    I argue for the superiority of non-gappy physicalism over gappy physicalism. While physicalists are united in denying an ontological gap between the phenomenal and the physical, the gappy affirm and the non-gappy deny a relevant epistemological gap. Central to my arguments will be contemplation of Swamp Mary, a being physically intrinsically similar to post-release Mary (a physically omniscient being who has experienced red) but has not herself (the Swamp being) experienced red. Swamp Mary has phenomenal knowledge of (...)
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  48. Martina Fürst (2011). What Mary's Aboutness Is About. Acta Analytica 26 (1):63-74.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to reinforce anti-physicalism by extending the hard problem to a specific kind of intentional states. For reaching this target, I investigate the mental content of the new intentional states of Jackson’s Mary. I proceed in the following way: I start analyzing the knowledge argument, which highlights the hard problem tied to phenomenal consciousness. In a second step, I investigate a powerful physicalist reply to this argument: the phenomenal concept strategy. In a third step, (...)
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  49. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2005). Mary Mary au Contraire: Reply to Raffman. Philosophical Studies 122 (2):203-12.score: 18.0
               Diana Raffman (in press) emphasizes a useful and important distinction that deserves heed in discussions of phenomenal consciousness: the distinction between what it’s like to see red and how red things look. (Two alternative locutions that also can express the latter idea, we take it, are ‘what red looks like’ and ‘what red is like’.) Raffman plausibly argues that this distinction should be incorporated into theories of phenomenal consciousness, including (...)
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  50. Aaron Simmons (2007). A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.score: 18.0
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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