Search results for 'Mary Kathryn McGowan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary Kathryn McGowan (2005). On Pornography: Mackinnon, Speech Acts, and "False" Construction. Hypatia 20 (3):22-49.score: 870.0
    : Although others have focused on Catharine MacKinnon's claim that pornography subordinates and silences women, I here focus on her claim that pornography constructs women's nature and that this construction is, in some sense, false. Since it is unclear how pornography, as speech, can construct facts and how constructed facts can nevertheless be false, MacKinnon's claim requires elucidation. Appealing to speech act theory, I introduce an analysis of the erroneous verdictive and use it to make sense of MacKinnon's constructionist claims. (...)
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  2. Mary Kathryn McGowan (2001). Impersonal Passion: Language as Affect (Review). Hypatia 21 (4):221-224.score: 870.0
  3. Mary Kate McGowan (2009). Oppressive Speech. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):389 – 407.score: 240.0
    I here present two different models of oppressive speech. My interest is not in how speech can cause oppression, but in how speech can actually be an act of oppression. As we shall see, a particular type of speech act, the exercitive, enacts permissibility facts. Since oppressive speech enacts permissibility facts that oppress, speech must be exercitive in order for it to be an act of oppression. In what follows, I distinguish between two sorts of exercitive speech acts (the standard (...)
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  4. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (2010). On Silencing, Rape, and Responsibility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):167 – 172.score: 240.0
    In a recent article in this journal, Nellie Wieland argues that silencing in the sense put forward by Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby has the unpalatable consequence of diminishing a rapist's responsibility for the rape. We argue both that Wieland misidentifies Langton and Hornsby's conception of silencing, and that neither Langton and Hornsby's actual conception, nor the one that Wieland attributes to them, in fact generates this consequence.
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  5. Mary Kate McGowan (2009). Debate: On Silencing and Sexual Refusal. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (4):487-494.score: 240.0
  6. Mary Kate Mcgowan (2004). Conversational Exercitives: Something Else We Do with Our Words. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (1):93-111.score: 240.0
    In this paper, I present a new (i.e., previously overlooked) breed of exercitive speech act (the conversational exercitive). I establish that any conversational contribution that invokes a rule of accommodation changes the bounds of conversational permissibility and is therefore an (indirect) exercitive speech act. Such utterances enact permissibility facts without expressing the content of such facts, without the speaker intending to be enacting such facts and without the hearer recognizing that it is so. Because of the peculiar nature ofthe rules (...)
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  7. Mary Kate Mcgowan, Alexandra Adelman, Sara Helmers & Jacqueline Stolzenberg (2011). A Partial Defense of Illocutionary Silencing. Hypatia 26 (1):132 - 149.score: 240.0
    Catharine MacKinnon has pioneered a new brand of anti-pornography argument. In particular, MacKinnon claims that pornography silences women in a way that violates their right to free speech. In what follows, we focus on a certain account of silencing put forward by Jennifer Hornsby and Rae Langton, and we defend that account against two important objections. The first objection contends that this account makes a crucial but false assumption about the necessary role of hearer recognition in successful speech acts. In (...)
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  8. Mary Kate McGowan, Shan Shan Tam & Margaret Hall (2009). “On Indirect Speech Acts and Linguistic Communication: A Response to Bertolet”. Philosophy 84 (4):495-513.score: 240.0
    Suppose a diner says, 'Can you pass the salt?' Although her utterance is literally a question (about the physical abilities of the addressee), most would take it as a request (that the addressee pass the salt). In such a case, the request is performed indirectly by way of directly asking a question. Accordingly this utterance is known as an indirect speech act. On the standard account of such speech acts, a single utterance constitutes two distinct speech acts. On this account (...)
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  9. Mary Kate McGowan (2002). The Neglected Controversy Over Metaphysical Realism. Philosophy 77 (1):5-21.score: 240.0
    In what follows, I motivate and clarify the controversy over metaphysical realism (the claim that there is a single objective way that the world is) by defending it against two objections. A clear understanding of why these objections are misguided goes a considerable distance in illuminating the complex and controversial nature of m-realism. Once the complex thesis is defined, some objections to it are considered. Since m-realism is such a complex and controversial thesis, it cannot legitimately be treated as inevitable (...)
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  10. Mary Kate McGowan (2003). Conversational Exercitives and the Force of Pornography. Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (2):155–189.score: 240.0
  11. Mary Kate Mcgowan (1999). The Metaphysics of Squaring Scientific Realism with Referential Indeterminacy. Erkenntnis 50 (1):83-90.score: 240.0
  12. Mary Kate McGowan (2003). Realism, Reference and Grue (Why Metaphysical Realism Cannot Solve the Grue Paradox). American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):47 - 57.score: 240.0
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  13. Mary Kate McGowan (2001). Privileging Properties. Philosophical Studies 105 (1):1-23.score: 240.0
    The idea that the world is human construction is fairly familiar and generally disparaged. One version of this claim is partially defendedhere. This subjectivist thesis concerns a debate about the objectivityof rightness of categorization. A problem about the discriminatoryrole of properties is both presented and motivated. The subjectivistthesis is articulated and defended against two powerful objections.Finally, this thesis is shown to be conceptually independent ofboth verificationism and empirical idealism.
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  14. Mary Kate McGowan (2009). Review of Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).score: 240.0
  15. Mary Kate McGowan (2012). On 'Whites Only' Signs and Racist Hate Speech: Verbal Acts of Racial Discrimination. In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and harm: Controversies over Free Speech. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
  16. Mary Kate McGowan (2002). Gruesome Connections. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):21-33.score: 240.0
    It is widely recognized that Goodman's grue example demonstrates that the rules for induction, unlike those for deduction, cannot be purely syntactic. Ways in which Goodman's proof generalizes, however, are not widely recognized. Gruesome considerations demonstrate that neither theories of simplicity nor theories of empirical confirmation can be purely syntactic. Moreover, the grue paradox can be seen as an instance of a much more general phenomenon. All empirical investigations require semantic constraints, since purely structural constraints are inadequate. Both Russell's theory (...)
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  17. Mary Kate Mcgowan (2014). Sincerity Silencing. Hypatia 29 (2):458-473.score: 240.0
    Catharine MacKinnon claims that pornography silences women in a way that violates the right to free speech. This claim is, of course, controversial, but if it is correct, then the very free speech reasons for protecting pornography appear also to afford reason to restrict it. For this reason, it has gained considerable attention. The philosophical literature thus far focuses on a type of silencing identified and analyzed by Jennifer Hornsby and Rae Langton (H&L). This article identifies, analyzes, and argues for (...)
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  18. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (eds.) (2012). Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This volume draws on a range of approaches in order to explore the problem and determine what ought to be done about allegedly harmful speech.
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  19. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (2007). The Limits of Free Speech: Pornography and the Question of Coverage. Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.score: 240.0
    Many liberal societies are deeply committed to freedom of speech. This commitment is so entrenched that when it seems to come into conflict with other commitments (e.g., gender equality), it is often argued that the commitment to speech must trump the other commitments. In this paper, we argue that a proper understanding of our commitment to free speech requires being clear about what should count as speech for these purposes. On the approach we defend, should get a special, technical sense, (...)
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  20. Mary Kate McGowan (2006). Book Review: Denise Riley. Impersonal Passion: Language as Affect. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (4):221-224.score: 240.0
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  21. Mary Kate Mcgowan (2006). Logic by Laurence Goldstein, Andrew Brennan, Max Deutsch and Joe Y.F. Lau. Philosophical Books 47 (3):272-273.score: 240.0
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  22. Mary Kate McGowan (2005). On Pornography: MacKinnon, Speech Acts, and "False" Construction. Hypatia 20 (3):22 - 49.score: 240.0
    Although others have focused on Catharine MacKinnon's claim that pornography subordinates and silences women, I here focus on her claim that pornography constructs women's nature and that this construction is, in some sense, false. Since it is unclear how pornography, as speech, can construct facts and how constructed facts can nevertheless be false, MacKinnon's claim requires elucidation. Appealing to speech act theory, I introduce an analysis of the erroneous verdictive and use it to make sense of MacKinnon's constructionist claims. I (...)
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  23. Mary Kate McGowan (1999). A World of States of Affairs D. M. Armstrong New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997, Xiii + 285 Pp., $54.95, $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):662-.score: 240.0
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  24. Mary Kate McGowan (1998). Book Review:Reading Putnam Peter Clark, Bob Hale. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 65 (2):372-.score: 240.0
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  25. Mary Kate Mcgowan (1999). A World of States of Affairs. Dialogue 38 (3):662-663.score: 240.0
     
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  26. Mary Kate McGowan & Ishani Maitra (2009). On Racist Hate Speech and the Scope of a Free Speech Principle. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):343-372.score: 240.0
     
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  27. Mary Kate McGowan & Ishani Maitra (2007). The Ethics of Free Speech. Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.score: 240.0
     
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  28. Christopher L. Stephens, Janine Jones & What Could Turn Out (2001). Mary Kate Mcgowan/Privileging Properties 1–23 Crawford L. Elder/the Problem of Harmonizing Laws 25–41 Gary Ebbs/is Skepticism About Self-Knowledge Coherent? 43–58 David Braun/Russellianism and Prediction 59–105. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 105:309-310.score: 140.0
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  29. L. W. Sumner (2013). Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan (Eds.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):710-718.score: 140.0
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  30. Richard Yeo (2003). Kathryn A. Neeley, Mary Somerville: Science, Illumination, and the Female Mind. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):105-108.score: 120.0
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  31. Andrew Koppelman (2013). Maitra , Ishani , and McGowan , Mary Kate , Eds. Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. 255. $99.00 (Cloth); $35.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (4):768-771.score: 120.0
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  32. Robert Mark Simpson (2013). Un-Ringing the Bell: Mcgowan on Oppressive Speech and The Asymmetric Pliability of Conversations. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (3):555-575.score: 58.0
    In recent work Mary Kate McGowan presents an account of oppressive speech inspired by David Lewis's analysis of conversational kinematics. Speech can effect identity-based oppression, she argues, by altering ?the conversational score??which is to say, roughly, that it can introduce presuppositions and expectations into a conversation, and thus determine what sort of subsequent conversational ?moves? are apt, correct, felicitous, etc.?in a manner that oppresses members of a certain group (e.g. because the suppositions and expectations derogate or demean members (...)
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  33. Corinna Hawkes (2004). A Journey in and Out of American Agriculture. Reflections on Debt and Dispossession by Kathryn Marie Dudley (University of Chicago Press, 2000). Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):413-418.score: 50.0
    I was optimistic of a new beginning in an open society when I came to America in 1999. Since then, I have indeed benefited from many aspects of American life. I have learned a lot – especially through my experience with small farms and farmers. But now, it's time to move on. And it was reading Debt and Dispossession, a book about American agriculture and human values, that crystallized in me why I wanted to leave. By telling the story of (...)
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  34. Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.) (2011). Educational Neuroscience. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors.1. Introduction: Educational Neuroscience (Kathryn E. Patten and Stephen R. Campbell).2. Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, methodology, and implications (Stephen R. Campbell).3. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning? (Anthony E. Kelly).4. A Multiperspective Approach to Neuroeducational Research (Paul A. Howard-Jones).5. What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education? (Michel Ferrari).6. Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where will the journey take us? (Daniel Ansar1, Donna Coch and Bert De Smedt).7. Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical (...)
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  35. Jennifer McRobert, Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.score: 24.0
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
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  36. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.score: 24.0
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  37. Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):377 - 391.score: 24.0
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
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  38. Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.score: 24.0
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they have (...)
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  39. Diana Barnes (2012). The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation. Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.score: 24.0

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
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  40. Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.score: 24.0
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  41. Kathryn Coe, Mary P. Harmon, Blair Verner & Andrew Tonn (1993). Tattoos and Male Alliances. Human Nature 4 (2):199-204.score: 24.0
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  42. Anita L. Allen, Sandra Lee Bartky, John Christman, Judith Wagner DeCew, Edward Johnson, Lenore Kuo, Mary Briody Mahowald, Kathryn Pauly Morgan, Melinda Roberts, Debra Satz, Susan Sherwin, Anita Superson, Mary Anne Warren & Susan Wendell (1995). 'Nagging' Questions: Feminist Ethics in Everyday Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 24.0
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  43. Mary Dombeck, Kathryn Markakis, Laura Brachman, Brinda Dalai & Tobie Olsan (2003). 15: Analysis of a Biopsychosocial Correspondence: Models, Mentors, and Meanings. In Richard M. Frankel, Timothy E. Quill & Susan H. McDaniel (eds.), The Biopsychosocial Approach: Past, Present, and Future. University of Rochester Press.score: 24.0
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  44. Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding (1989). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 24.0
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  45. Charles Lydeard, Robert H. Cowie, Winston F. Ponder, Arthur E. Bogan, Philippe Bouchet, Stephanie A. Clark, Kevin S. Cummings, Terrence J. Frest, Olivier Gargominy, Dai G. Herbert, Robert Hershler, Kathryn E. Perez, Barry Roth, Mary Seddon, Ellen E. Strong & Fred G. Thompson (2004). The Global Decline of Nonmarine Mollusks. BioScience 54 (4):321.score: 24.0
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  46. Mary D. Naylor, Kathryn H. Bowles, Kathleen M. McCauley, Maureen C. Maccoy, Greg Maislin, Mark V. Pauly & Randall Krakauer (2013). High‐Value Transitional Care: Translation of Research Into Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):727-733.score: 24.0
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  47. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.score: 21.0
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  48. Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It (...)
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  49. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2013). Mary Mahowald: Removing Blinders and Crossing Boundaries. The Pluralist 8 (3):114-121.score: 21.0
    In what follows I will briefly address (1) Mahowald's work on Josiah Royce, (2) her advocacy for "cultural feminism" and its implications for American philosophy and work still to be done, (3) her promotion of a critical pragmatism and the need to provide a pragmatist critique not only of gender injustice but all forms of injustice, and (4) Mahowald's argument for the strategy of "standpoint theory," a strategy that offers great promise for future work in American philosophy.
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  50. Gabriel Andrade (2004). Metáforas No Verbales: En Torna a Mary Douglas y Claude Lévi-Strauss. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (25):99-120.score: 21.0
    This ar ti cle ex tends, from a philo soph i cal and an thro po log i cal point of view, the re cent dis - cus sions as to what is met a phoric. Lan guage phi - los o phers have con trib uted to the un der stand ing of the na ture and func tion of met a phors, but their com ments have been tra ..
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