Search results for 'Mary Lynne Ellis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Mary Lynne Ellis (2010). Questioning Identities: Philosophy in Psychoanalytic Practice. Karnac.
    In this new book, Mary Lynne Ellis and Noreen O'Connor move to the heart of 21st century intertwining of psychoanalytical and philosophical critical reflections ...
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  2.  21
    Anthony Ellis (2003). Review of Mary Warnock, Making Babies: Is There a Right to Have Children?. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (6).
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  3. Mary Jane Ellis (1938). Astronomy: Verse. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 19 (4):401.
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  4.  8
    Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, Douglas Denon Heath, William Rawley & James Spedding, Works; Collected and Edited by James Spedding, R.L. Ellis and D.D. Heath.
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  5.  5
    Francis Bacon, Robert Leslie Ellis, Douglas Denon Heath, William Rawley & James Spedding, Works; Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis and Douglas Denon Heath.
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  6.  2
    H. D. Ellis, A. H. Quaylea, A. W. Young & K. W. de Pauw (1997). Response From Ellis, Young, Quayle and de Pauw. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):158.
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  7.  2
    Robinson Ellis (1899). Robinson Ellis Stadtmüller's Anthologia Graeca Vol. II. Teubner 1899. Pp. Xcii, 524. 8 Mk. The Classical Review 13 (09):444-447.
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  8. Francis Bacon & Robert Leslie Ellis (1906). Novum Organum, Tr. By R. Ellis and J. Spedding, with Notes.
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  9. A. Ellis (1997). Why I Am a Secular Humanist: An Interview with Albert Ellis. Free Inquiry 17:35-36.
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  10. Robert C. Solomon (1992). Sandor Goodhart, Ronald Bogue, Denis B. Walker, Timothy Clark, C. S. Schreiner, Robert Tobin, John Kleiner, David Carey, Chris Parkin, John Anzalone, Richard K. Emmerson, Janet Lungstrum, Alex Fischler, Hugh Bredin, Victor A. Kramer, Steven Rendall, Gerald Prince, John D. Lyons, David Hayman, Roberta Davidson, Dan Latimer, Joseph J. Maier, Kenneth Marc Harris, Lynne Vieth, Joanne Cutting-Gray, Michael L. Hall, Mark P. Drost, John J. Stuhr, Charles Affron, Celia E. Weller, Jerome Schwartz, Mary B. McKinley, Patrick Henry. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 16 (1):174.
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  11. Donald Phillip Verene (1994). Mary Anne O'Neil, William E. Cain, Christopher Wise, C. S. Schreiner, Willis Salomon, James A. Grimshaw, Jr., Donald K. Hedrick, Wendell V. Harris, Paul Duro, Julia Epstein, Gerald Prince, Douglas Robinson, Lynne S. Vieth, Richard Eldridge, Robert Stoothoff, John Anzalone, Kevin Walzer, Eric J. Ziolkowski, Jacqueline LeBlanc, Anna Carew-Miller, Alfred R. Mele, David Herman, James M. Lang, Andrew J. McKenna, Michael Calabrese, Robert Tobin, Sandor Goodhart, Moira Gatens, Paul Douglass, John F. Desmond, James L. Battersby, Marie J. Aquilino, Celia E. Weller, Joel Black, Sandra Sherman, Herman Rapaport, Jonathan Levin, Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, David Lewis Schaefer. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):131.
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  12.  2
    Mary Loyola (1931). Book Review:Ethical Teachings in the Latin Hymns of Mediaeval England. Ruth Ellis Messenger. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (2):251-.
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  13.  1
    Joel S. Warm, William N. Dember, Anne Z. Murphy & Mary Lynne Dittmar (1992). Sensing and Decision-Making Components of the Signal-Regularity Effect in Vigilance Performance. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (4):297-300.
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  14.  3
    Mary Lynne Dittmar, Daniel B. Berch & Joel S. Warm (1982). Sustained Visual Attention in Deaf and Hearing Adults. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (6):339-342.
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  15. Massimo Pigliucci (2014). 5 Questions on Science & Religion. In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), 5 Questions on Science & Religion. Automatic Press 163-170.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open questions, problems, or (...)
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  16. Jennifer McRobert, Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
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  17.  43
    Axel Gelfert (2015). Symbol Systems as Collective Representational Resources: Mary Hesse, Nelson Goodman, and the Problem of Scientific Representation. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (6):52-61.
    This short paper grew out of an observation—made in the course of a larger research project—of a surprising convergence between, on the one hand, certain themes in the work of Mary Hesse and Nelson Goodman in the 1950/60s and, on the other hand, recent work on the representational resources of science, in particular regarding model-based representation. The convergence between these more recent accounts of representation in science and the earlier proposals by Hesse and Goodman consists in the recognition that, (...)
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  18.  20
    Jacqueline Broad (2014). Mary Astell on Marriage and Lockean Slavery. History of Political Thought 35 (4):717–38.
    In the 1706 third edition of her Reflections upon Marriage, Mary Astell alludes to John Locke’s definition of slavery in her descriptions of marriage. She describes the state of married women as being ‘subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, Arbitrary Will of another Man’ (Locke, Two Treatises, II.22). Recent scholars maintain that Astell does not seriously regard marriage as a form of slavery in the Lockean sense. In this paper, I defend the contrary position: I argue that Astell does (...)
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  19.  20
    Jacqueline Broad (2009). Mary Astell on Virtuous Friendship. Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies 26 (2):65-86.
    According to some scholars, Mary Astell’s feminist programme is severely limited by its focus on self-improvement rather than wider social change. In response, I highlight the role of ‘virtuous friendship’ in Astell’s 1694 work, A Serious Proposal to the Ladies. Building on classical ideals and traditional Christian principles, Astell promotes the morally transformative power of virtuous friendship among women. By examining the significance of such friendship to Astell’s feminism, we can see that she did in fact aim to bring (...)
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  20.  16
    Virginia Sapiro (1992). A Vindication of Political Virtue: The Political Theory of Mary Wollstonecraft. University of Chicago Press.
    Nearly two hundred years ago, Mary Wollstonecraft wrote what is considered to be the first major work of feminist political theory: A Vindication of the Rights of Women . Much has been written about this work, and about Wollstonecraft as the intellectual pioneer of feminism, but the actual substance and coherence of her political thought have been virtually ignored. Virginia Sapiro here provides the first full-length treatment of Wollstonecraft's political theory. Drawing on all of Wollstonecraft's works and treating them (...)
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  21.  10
    Karen Green (2012). When is a Contract Theorist Not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes. In Nancy Hirschmann Joanne Wright (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. Penn State 169-89.
    Although Catharine Macaulay was a contract theorist and early feminist her philosophy is not based on a concept of liberty like that of Hobbes, but on a notion of individual liberty as self government close to that accepted by Mary Astell. This raises the question of whether criticisms of liberal feminism which assume that it is rooted in Hobbes's suspect notion of freedom and consent may miss there mark.
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  22.  68
    Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  23.  11
    David C. Geary, M. Catherine DeSoto, Mary K. Hoard, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & M. Lynne Cooper (2001). Estrogens and Relationship Jealousy. Human Nature 12 (4):299-320.
    The relation between sex hormones and responses to partner infidelity was explored in two studies reported here. The first confirmed the standard sex difference in relationship jealousy, that males (n=133) are relatively more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity and females (n=159) by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The study also revealed that females using hormone-based birth control (n=61) tended more toward sexual jealousy than did other females, and reported more intense affective responses to partner infidelity (n=77). In study two, 47 (...)
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  24.  52
    Aaron Simmons (2007). A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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  25.  17
    James T. Turner Jr (2014). No Explanation of Persons, No Explanation of Resurrection: On Lynne Baker’s Constitution View and the Resurrection of Human Persons. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (3):297-317.
    I don’t think Lynne Rudder Baker’s constitution view can account for personal identity problems of a synchronic or diachronic nature. As such, it cannot accommodate the Christian’s claim of eschatological bodily resurrection-a principle reason for which she gives this account. In light of this, I press objections against her constitution view in the following ways: First, I critique an analogy she draws between Aristotle’s “accidental sameness” and constitution. Second, I address three problems for Baker’s constitution view [‘Constitution Problems’ ], (...)
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  26. Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.) (2001). Explaining Beliefs: Lynne Rudder Baker and Her Critics. Stanford: CSLI Publications.
    The philosophy of mind has long been dominated by the view that mental states are identical with, constituted by, or grounded in brain states. Lynne Rudder Baker has been a persistent critic of this view, developing instead a theory grounded in a larger metaphysical outlook called Practical Realism. This volume is the first critical book-length evaluation of her views and criticism; leading philosophers answer her challenges and explore the consequences of Practical Realism, and Baker herself provides thoughtful replies to (...)
     
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  27. Maria J. Falco (ed.) (1995). Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft. Penn State University Press.
    Combining the liberalism of Locke and the "civic humanism" of Republicanism, Mary Wollstonecraft explored the need of women for coed and equal education with men, economic independence whether married or not, and representation as citizens in the halls of government. In doing so, she foreshadowed and surpassed her much better known successor, John Stuart Mill. Ten feminist scholars prominent in the fields of political philosophy, constitutional and international law, rhetoric, literature, and psychology argue here that Wollstonecraft, by reason of (...)
     
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  28.  24
    Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (2):377 - 391.
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
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  29.  7
    Diana Barnes (2012). The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation. Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
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  30.  5
    Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon : A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  31.  11
    Jacqueline Broad (2015). The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    Mary Astell is best known today as one of the earliest English feminists. This book sheds new light on her writings by interpreting her first and foremost as a moral philosopher—as someone committed to providing guidance on how best to live. The central claim of this work is that all the different strands of Astell’s thought—her epistemology, her metaphysics, her philosophy of the passions, her feminist vision, and her conservative political views—are best understood in light of her ethical objectives. (...)
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  32. Mary Galbraith & Lynne Hewitt (1988). Cognition and Symbolic Structures: The Psychology of Metaphoric Transformation. [REVIEW] Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (4).
     
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  33. Mary Shepherd & Jennifer Mcrobert (2000). Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  34. Marco Verweij, Shenghua Luan & Mark Nowacki, How to Test Cultural Theory: Suggestions for Future Research.
    This symposium highlighted the relevance of the cultural theory pioneered by anthropologists Mary Douglas, Steve Rayner, and Michael Thompson and political scientists Aaron Wildavsky and Richard Ellis for explaining political phenomena. In this concluding article, we suggest ways in which CT can be further tested and developed. First, we describe how the theory has been applied thus far and some of the achievements of these applications. Then, we examine some of the challenges revealed by this research. Finally, we (...)
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  35. Mary Warnock (2002). Mary Warnock a Memoir : People & Places.
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  36. David Marshall (1988). The Surprising Effects of Sympathy Marivaux, Diderot, Rousseau, and Mary Shelley. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  37.  14
    Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It (...)
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  38. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  39.  6
    Gabriel Andrade (2004). Metáforas No Verbales: En Torna a Mary Douglas y Claude Lévi-Strauss. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (25):99-120.
    This ar ti cle ex tends, from a philo soph i cal and an thro po log i cal point of view, the re cent dis - cus sions as to what is met a phoric. Lan guage phi - los o phers have con trib uted to the un der stand ing of the na ture and func tion of met a phors, but their com ments have been tra ..
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  40.  13
    Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2013). Mary Mahowald: Removing Blinders and Crossing Boundaries. The Pluralist 8 (3):114-121.
    In what follows I will briefly address (1) Mahowald's work on Josiah Royce, (2) her advocacy for "cultural feminism" and its implications for American philosophy and work still to be done, (3) her promotion of a critical pragmatism and the need to provide a pragmatist critique not only of gender injustice but all forms of injustice, and (4) Mahowald's argument for the strategy of "standpoint theory," a strategy that offers great promise for future work in American philosophy.
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  41.  19
    Alan N. Sussman (1978). Semantic Analysis in the Philosophy of Mind: A Reply to Ellis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 56 (May):68-71.
  42.  13
    Charles E. M. Dunlop (1977). Lehrer and Ellis on Incorrigibility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 55 (December):201-5.
  43. Shaun Hargreaves Heap & Angus Ross (1992). Understanding the Enterprise Culture Themes in the Work of Mary Douglas.
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  44. Mary E. James (2016). Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Research: The Selected Works of Mary E. James. Routledge.
    In the _World Library of Educationalists_, international experts themselves compile career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces – extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, major theoretical and practical contributions – so the world can read them in a single manageable volume, allowing readers to follow the themes of their work and see how it contributes to the development of the field. Mary James has researched and written on a range of educational subjects (...)
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  45.  97
    Mary Rose D'Angelo (forthcoming). Book Review: The Mary Magdalene Tradition: Witness and Counter-Witness in Early Christian Communities. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (1):106-107.
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  46. Alex Byrne (2002). Something About Mary. Grazer Philosophische Studien 63 (1):27-52.
    Jackson's black-and-white Mary teaches us that the propositional content of perception cannot be fully expressed in language.
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  47.  50
    Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2012). Mary Wollstonecraft, Freedom and the Enduring Power of Social Domination. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (2):116-135.
    Even long after their formal exclusion has come to an end, members of previously oppressed social groups often continue to face disproportionate restrictions on their freedom, as the experience of many women over the last century has shown. Working within in a framework in which freedom is understood as independence from arbitrary power, Mary Wollstonecraft provides an explanation of why such domination may persist and offers a model through which it can be addressed. Republicans rely on processes of rational (...)
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  48.  6
    Martina Reuter (2014). “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau. Hypatia 29 (4):925-941.
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on (...)
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  49.  36
    David N. Stamos (2005). Pre-Darwinian Taxonomy and Essentialism – a Reply to Mary Winsor. Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):79-96.
    Mary Winsor (2003) argues against the received view that pre-Darwinian taxonomy was characterized mainly by essentialism. She argues, instead, that the methods of pre-Darwinian taxonomists, in spite of whatever their beliefs, were that of clusterists, so that the received view, propagated mainly by certain modern biologists and philosophers of biology, should at last be put to rest as a myth. I argue that shes right when it comes to higher taxa, but wrong when it comes the most important category (...)
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  50.  67
    Nicholas Everitt (2014). Critical Review of Mary Midgley's Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):665-674.
    Mary Midgley's pamphlet Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems has been a widely read contribution to discussions of the place of creationism in schools. In this critique of her account, I outline Midgley's view of the relations between science and religion, her claims about what material can legitimately appear in science lessons, and her account of the nature of religion. I argue that she is mistaken in all three areas, and show that her most plausible reply to these (...)
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