Search results for 'Mary McNaughton Collins' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary McNaughton Collins, Floyd J. Fowler, Richard G. Roberts, Joseph E. Oesterling, George J. Annas & Michael J. Barry (1997). Medical Malpractice Implications of PSA Testing for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):234-242.score: 870.0
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  2. Hans Dieter Betz, Adela Yarbro Collins & Margaret Mary Mitchell (eds.) (2001). Antiquity and Humanity: Essays on Ancient Religion and Philosophy: Presented to Hans Dieter Betz on His 70th Birthday. Mohr Siebeck.score: 240.0
  3. Mary Collins (1936). General Experimental Psychology. By A. G. Bills. (London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1934. Pp. X + 620. Price 16s.). Philosophy 11 (44):493-.score: 240.0
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  4. Clinton Collins, Rita M. Bean, Richard A. Brosio, Diane M. Dunlap, Harvey H. Neufeldt, Joan K. Smith, Donald Arnstine, William Casement & Mary E. Henry (1992). Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 23 (1):18-69.score: 240.0
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  5. Mary Collins (1934). Social Development in Young Children: A Study in Beginnings. By Susan Isaacs. (London: Routledge & Sons, 1933. Pp. Vii + 480. Price 15s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 9 (34):250-.score: 240.0
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  6. Mary K. L. Collins, Gordon R. Perkins, Gemma Rodriguez‐Tarduchy, Maria Angela Nieto & Abelardo López‐Rivas (1994). Growth Factors as Survival Factors: Regulation of Apoptosis. Bioessays 16 (2):133-138.score: 240.0
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  7. Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (2011). The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08. Broadview Press.score: 210.0
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
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  8. John J. Collins & Daniel C. Harlow (eds.) (2010). The "Other" in Second Temple Judaism: Essays in Honor of John J. Collins. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 180.0
    Based on a conference held Apr. 4-5, 2008 at Amherst College.
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  9. H. M. Collins (1992). Epistemological Chicken HM Collins and Steven Yearley. In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. 301.score: 180.0
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  10. David McNaughton, Piers Rawling & Sabina Lovibond (2004). Naturalism And Normativity: Reply to McNaughton and Rawling. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 104 (1):187-203.score: 180.0
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  11. Anthony Collins (1976). Determinism and Freewill: Anthony Collins' a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty: With a Discussion of the Opinions of Hobbes, Locke, Pierre Bayle, William King and Leibniz. Nijhoff.score: 180.0
  12. James Daniel Collins & Linus J. Thro (eds.) (1982). History of Philosophy in the Making: A Symposium of Essays to Honor Professor James D. Collins on His 65th Birthday. University Press of America.score: 180.0
     
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  13. H. M. Collins (1992). Journey Into Space HM Collins and Steven Yearley. In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. 369.score: 180.0
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  14. T. H. Pear (1926). Experimental Psychology. By Mary Collins, M.A., B.Ed., Ph.D., Lecturer in Applied Psychology in the University of Edinburgh, and James Drever, M.A., B.Sc, D.Phil., F.R.S.E., Director of the George Combe Psychological Laboratory, University of Edinburgh. (London: Methuen & Co., 1926. Pp. 315 + 27 Diagrams. Price 6s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 1 (03):394-.score: 120.0
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  15. James Collins (1967). "Philosophie de la Nature," by Jean-Marie Aubert. Modern Schoolman 44 (3):260-262.score: 120.0
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  16. J. A. Hobson (1937). Theory of the Democratic State. By Marie Collins Swabey. (Cambridge, U.S.A.: Harvard University Press; London: Oxford University Press, Humphrey Milford. 1937. Pp. 234. Price 2 Dollars 50 Cents.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 12 (48):500-.score: 50.0
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  17. Harold A. Larrabee (1937). Book Review:Theory of the Democratic State. Marie Collins Swabey. [REVIEW] Ethics 48 (1):117-.score: 50.0
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  18. Philip Lee Ralph (1956). Book Review:The Judgment of History Marie Collins Swabey. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 23 (2):167-.score: 50.0
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  19. Louise Antz (1966). Marie Collins Swabey 1890-1966. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 40:127 -.score: 50.0
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  20. Jennifer McRobert, Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.score: 24.0
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
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  21. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.score: 24.0
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  22. Charles T. Wolfe (2007). “Determinism/Spinozism in the Radical Enlightenment: The Cases of Anthony Collins and Denis Diderot”. International Review of Eighteenth-Century Studies 1 (1):37-51.score: 24.0
    In his Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty (1717), the English deist Anthony Collins proposed a complete determinist account of the human mind and action, partly inspired by his mentor Locke, but also by elements from Bayle, Leibniz and other Continental sources. It is a determinism which does not neglect the question of the specific status of the mind but rather seeks to provide a causal account of mental activity and volition in particular; it is a ‘volitional determinism’. Some decades (...)
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  23. Evan Selinger (2008). Collins's Incorrect Depiction of Dreyfus's Critique of Artificial Intelligence. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):301-308.score: 24.0
    Harry Collins interprets Hubert Dreyfus’s philosophy of embodiment as a criticism of all possible forms of artificial intelligence. I argue that this characterization is inaccurate and predicated upon a misunderstanding of the relevance of phenomenology for empirical scientific research.
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  24. Maria Rentetzi (2005). The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):377 - 391.score: 24.0
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
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  25. Eduardo J. Dubuc & Yuri Poveda (2013). The Intimate Relationship Between the McNaughton and the Chinese Remainder Theorems for MV-Algebras. Studia Logica 101 (3):483-485.score: 24.0
    We show the intimate relationship between McNaughton Theorem and the Chinese Remaindner Theorem for MV-algebras. We develop a very short and simple proof of McNaughton Theorem. The arguing is elementary and right out of the definitions. We exhibit the theorem as just an instance of the Chinese theorem. Since the variety of MV-algebras is arithmetic, the Chinese theorem holds for MV-algebras. However, to make this paper self-contained and entirely elementary, we include a simple proof of this theorem inspired (...)
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  26. Diana Barnes (2012). The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation. Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.score: 24.0

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
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  27. Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.score: 24.0
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  28. Mariko Ogawa (2001). The Mysterious Mr. Collins: Living for 140 Years in "Origin of Species&Quot;. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):461 - 479.score: 24.0
    In "Origin of Species," the object of intense research for nearly a century and a half, Charles Darwin refers to a "Mr. Collins" as if he were a famous cattle breeder. In fact, there is no mention of a famous cattle breeder called Collins anywhere else in the literature, although there is a suitable candidate for this description by the name of "Colling." Darwin's reference to Mr. Collins is probably an error. This paper will attempt to establish (...)
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  29. Marleen Rozemond (2008). The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke-Collins Correspondenc. In Tom Lennon & Robert Stainton (eds.), The Achilles of Rational Psychology.score: 24.0
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think, or be conscious. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the subject of the mental against Anthony Collins’ materialism. This paper examines important assumptions about the nature of body that play a role in their debate. Clarke argued that consciousness requires an “individual being”, an entity with some sort of significant unity as its subject. They agree (...)
     
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  30. Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (2003). Introduction to There's Something About Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.score: 21.0
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  31. Alice MacLachlan (2012). Forgiveness. By Eve Garrard and David McNaughton. (Acumen Publishing Ltd, 2010. Pp. Xi + 132. Price £9.99.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):435-438.score: 21.0
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  32. Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It (...)
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  33. Mark Addis (2013). Response to Collins. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):427-429.score: 21.0
  34. David A. Stone (2013). Reply to Collins. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):419-421.score: 21.0
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  35. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley (2013). Mary Mahowald: Removing Blinders and Crossing Boundaries. The Pluralist 8 (3):114-121.score: 21.0
    In what follows I will briefly address (1) Mahowald's work on Josiah Royce, (2) her advocacy for "cultural feminism" and its implications for American philosophy and work still to be done, (3) her promotion of a critical pragmatism and the need to provide a pragmatist critique not only of gender injustice but all forms of injustice, and (4) Mahowald's argument for the strategy of "standpoint theory," a strategy that offers great promise for future work in American philosophy.
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  36. Gabriel Andrade (2004). Metáforas No Verbales: En Torna a Mary Douglas y Claude Lévi-Strauss. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 9 (25):99-120.score: 21.0
    This ar ti cle ex tends, from a philo soph i cal and an thro po log i cal point of view, the re cent dis - cus sions as to what is met a phoric. Lan guage phi - los o phers have con trib uted to the un der stand ing of the na ture and func tion of met a phors, but their com ments have been tra ..
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  37. Allan Mazur (2009). A Hormonal Interpretation of Collins's Micro‐Sociological Theory of Violence. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (4):434-447.score: 21.0
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  38. Luca Malatesti (2008). Mary's Scientific Knowledge. Prolegomena 7 (1):37-59.score: 18.0
    Frank Jackson’s knowledge argument (KA) aims to prove, by means of a thought experiment concerning the hypothetical scientist Mary, that conscious experiences have non-physical properties, called qualia. Mary has complete scientific knowledge of colours and colour vision without having had any colour experience. The central intuition in the KA is that, by seeing colours, Mary will learn what it is like to have colour experiences. Therefore, her scientific knowledge is incomplete, and conscious experiences have qualia. In this (...)
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  39. Robert van Gulick (2004). So Many Ways of Saying No to Mary. In Peter Ludlow, Yujin Nagasawa & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument. MIT Press.score: 18.0
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  40. Alex Byrne (2002). Something About Mary. Grazer Philosophische Studien 63 (1):27-52.score: 18.0
    Jackson's black-and-white Mary teaches us that the propositional content of perception cannot be fully expressed in language.
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  41. Cynthia Macdonald (2004). Mary Meets Molyneux: The Explanatory Gap and the Individuation of Phenomenal Concepts. Noûs 38 (3):503-24.score: 18.0
    It is widely accepted that physicalism faces its most serious challenge when it comes to making room for the phenomenal character of psychological experience, its so-called what-it-is-like aspect. The challenge has surfaced repeatedly over the past two decades in a variety of forms. In a particularly striking one, Frank Jackson considers a situation in which Mary, a brilliant scientist who knows all the physical facts there are to know about psychological experience, has spent the whole of her life in (...)
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  42. Barbara Montero (2007). Physicalism Could Be True Even If Mary Learns Something New. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):176-189.score: 18.0
    Mary knows all there is to know about physics, chemistry and neurophysiology, yet has never experienced colour. Most philosophers think that if Mary learns something genuinely new upon seeing colour for the first time, then physicalism is false. I argue, however, that physicalism is consistent with Mary's acquisition of new information. Indeed, even if she has perfect powers of deduction, and higher-level physical facts are a priori deducible from lower-level ones, Mary may still lack concepts which (...)
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  43. Robert P. Lovering (2004). Mary Anne Warren on “Full” Moral Status. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):509-530.score: 18.0
    In the contemporary debate on moral status, it is not uncommon to find philosophers who embrace the following basic moral principle: -/- The Principle of Full Moral Status: The degree to which an entity E possesses moral status is proportional to the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties until a threshold degree of morally relevant properties possession is reached, whereupon the degree to which E possesses morally relevant properties may continue to increase, but the degree to which E (...)
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  44. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1990). Describing the Emotions: A Review of the Cognitive Structure of Emotions by Ortony, Clore & Collins. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):305 – 317.score: 18.0
    This paper critically examines Ortony, Clore & Collins's book The Cognitive Structure of Emotions. The book is found to present a very valuable, comprehensive and systematic account of emotions. Despite its obvious value the book has various flaws; these are discussed and an alternative is suggested.
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  45. Douglas W. Portmore (2001). McNaughton and Rawling on the Agent-Relative/Agent-Neutral Distinction. Utilitas 13 (03):350-356.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I criticize David McNaughton and Piers Rawling's formalization of the agent-relative/agent-neutral distinction. I argue that their formalization is unable to accommodate an important ethical distinction between two types of conditional obligations. I then suggest a way of revising their formalization so as to fix the problem.
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  46. Pete Mandik, Swamp Mary Semantics: A Case for Physicalism Without Gaps.score: 18.0
    I argue for the superiority of non-gappy physicalism over gappy physicalism. While physicalists are united in denying an ontological gap between the phenomenal and the physical, the gappy affirm and the non-gappy deny a relevant epistemological gap. Central to my arguments will be contemplation of Swamp Mary, a being physically intrinsically similar to post-release Mary (a physically omniscient being who has experienced red) but has not herself (the Swamp being) experienced red. Swamp Mary has phenomenal knowledge of (...)
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  47. Martina Fürst (2011). What Mary's Aboutness Is About. Acta Analytica 26 (1):63-74.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to reinforce anti-physicalism by extending the hard problem to a specific kind of intentional states. For reaching this target, I investigate the mental content of the new intentional states of Jackson’s Mary. I proceed in the following way: I start analyzing the knowledge argument, which highlights the hard problem tied to phenomenal consciousness. In a second step, I investigate a powerful physicalist reply to this argument: the phenomenal concept strategy. In a third step, (...)
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  48. George Graham & Terence E. Horgan (2005). Mary Mary au Contraire: Reply to Raffman. Philosophical Studies 122 (2):203-12.score: 18.0
               Diana Raffman (in press) emphasizes a useful and important distinction that deserves heed in discussions of phenomenal consciousness: the distinction between what it’s like to see red and how red things look. (Two alternative locutions that also can express the latter idea, we take it, are ‘what red looks like’ and ‘what red is like’.) Raffman plausibly argues that this distinction should be incorporated into theories of phenomenal consciousness, including (...)
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  49. Aaron Simmons (2007). A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.score: 18.0
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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  50. Mark Douglas Saward (2014). Collins' Core Fine-Tuning Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):209-222.score: 18.0
    Collins (The Blackwell companion to natural theology, 2009) presents an argument he calls the ‘core fine-tuning argument’. In this paper, I show that Collins’ argument is flawed in at least two ways. First, the structure, depending on likelihoods, fails to establish anything about the posterior probability of God’s existence given fine-tuning. As an argument for God’s existence, this is a serious failing. Second, his analysis of what is appropriately restricted background knowledge, combined with the credences of a specially (...)
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