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  1. Mary Midgley (forthcoming). Biotechnology And. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Mary Midgley (2014). Are You an Illusion? Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the remarkable gap that has opened up between our own understanding of our sense of our self and today's scientific orthodoxy that claims the self to be nothing more than an elaborate illusion. Bringing her formidable acuity and analytic skills to bear, she exposes some very odd claims and muddled thinking on the part of cognitive scientists and psychologists when it comes to talk about the self. Well-known philosophical problems in causality, subjectivity, empiricism, free will (...)
     
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  3. Mary Midgley (2014). Does Philosophy Get Out of Date? Philosophy Now 103:18-21.
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  4. Mary Midgley (2014). The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene. Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does not derive (...)
     
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  5. Mary Midgley (2012). Death and the Human Animal. Philosophy Now 89:10-13.
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  6. Mary Midgley (2012). Wickedness-An Open Debate: Responses and Replies. The Philosophers' Magazine 56.
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  7. Mary Midgley (2011). Classifications in Contexts. Zygon 46 (1).
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  8. Mary Midgley (2011). Darwinism, Purpose and Meaning. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68 (68):193-201.
    Researchers report that people who are asked to give their reason for converting to Creationism often say that they have done so because they see it as the only possible alternative to ‘Darwinism’ – something which they find intolerable and equate with scientific atheism.
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  9. Mary Midgley (2011). The Mythology of Selfishness. The Philosophers' Magazine 53:35-45.
    Darwin said that our social instincts are so crucial to our lives that they must have been strongly developed during evolution by means of group-selection. These instincts now ground our motives and shape the complexity of our lives. So the idea of deriving all our motivation from the single stem of “selfishness” is radically mistaken.
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  10. Mary Midgley (2011). Why The Idea Of Purpose Won't Go Away. Philosophy 86 (04):545-561.
    Biologists' current habit of explaining each feature of human life separately through its evolutionary function — its assumed tendency to enhance each individual's reproductive prospects — is unworkable. It also sits oddly with these scientists' official rejection of teleology, since it treats all life as a process which does have an aim, namely, to perpetuate itself. But that aim is empty because it is circular. If we want to understand the behaviour of living things (including humans) we have to treat (...)
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  11. Mary Midgley (2009). Love and its Disappointment. Philosophy Now 75:42-42.
  12. Mary Midgley (2009). Purpose, Meaning and Darwinism. Philosophy Now 71:16-19.
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  13. Mary Midgley (2008). Evolution as a Religion. Filosoficky Casopis 56:129-133.
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  14. Mary Midgley (2007). A Plague on Both Their Houses. Philosophy Now 64:26-27.
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  15. Mary Midgley (2007). Owl of Minerva: A Memoir. Routledge.
    One of the UK’s foremost living moral philosophers, Mary Midgley recounts her remarkable story in this elegiac and moving account of friendships found and lost, bitter philosophical battles and of a profound love of teaching. In spite of her many books and public profile, little is known about Mary’s life. Part of a famous generation of women philosophers that includes Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Warnock and Iris Murdoch, Midgley tells us in vivid and humorous fashion how they cut a (...)
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  16. Mary Midgley (2007). What Do We Mean by Security? Philosophy Now 61:12-15.
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  17. Mary Midgley (2006). Dover Beach Revisited. Think 4 (12):69-74.
    Mary Midgley asks, ‘What do we mean when we say that things are real or illusory?’.
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  18. Mary Midgley (2006). Dover Beach: Understanding the Pains of Bereavement. Philosophy 81 (2):209-230.
    Matthew Arnold, writing sadly of the receding Sea of Faith, gave his image a vast and deadly application —… The world, which seemsTo lie before us like a land of dreamsSo various, so beautiful, so new,Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain—.
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  19. Mary Midgley (2006). Editorial Introduction. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (5):8-16.
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  20. Mary Midgley (2006). Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford Univ Pr.
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  21. Mary Midgley (2005). Souls, Minds, Bodies and Planets. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):7-.
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  22. Mary Midgley (2005). The Essential Mary Midgley. Routledge.
    Feared and admired in equal measure, Mary Midgely has carefully, yet profoundly challenged many of the scientific and moral orthodoxies of the twentieth century. The Essential Mary Midgley collects for the first time the very best of this famous philosopher's work, described by the Financial Times as "commonsense philosophy of the highest order." This anthology includes carefully chosen selections from her best-selling books, including Wickedness, Beast and Man, Science and Poetry and The Myths We Live By . It provides a (...)
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  23. Mary Midgley (2005). The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir. Routledge.
    "Charming, interesting, thought-provoking and a great read." Rosalind Hursthouse The daughter of a pacifist rector who answered "No!" when his congregation asked him "Is everything in the bible true?", perhaps Mary Midgley was destined to become a philosopher. Yet few would have thought this inquisitive, untidy, nature-loving child would become "one of the sharpest critical pens in the west." This is her remarkable story. Probably the only philosopher to have been in Vienna on the eve of its invasion by Nazi (...)
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  24. Mary Midgley (2004). Zombies Can't Concentrate. Philosophy Now 44:24-25.
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  25. Mary Midgley (2003). Heart and Mind: The Varieties of Moral Experience. Routledge.
    With a new introduction by the author. It is a book of superb spirit and style, more entertaining than a work of philosophy has any right to be.’ – Times Literary Supplement. Throughout our lives we are making moral choices. Some decisions simply direct our everyday comings and goings; others affect our individual destinies. How do we make those choices? Where does our sense of right and wrong come from, and how can we make more informed decisions? In clear, entertaining (...)
     
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  26. Mary Midgley (2003). News Hound. The Philosophers' Magazine 21:6.
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  27. Mary Midgley (2003/2011). The Myths We Live By. Routledge.
    Mary Midgley argues in her powerful new book that far from being the opposite of science, myth is a central part of it. In brilliant prose, she claims that myths are neither lies nor mere stories but a network of powerful symbols that suggest particular ways of interpreting the world.
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  28. Mary Midgley (2002). Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears. Routledge.
    According to a profile in The Guardian , Mary Midgley is 'the foremost scourge of scientific pretensions in this country; someone whose wit is admired even by those who feel she sometimes oversteps the mark'. Considered one of Britain's finest philosophers, Midgley exposes the illogical logic of poor doctrines that shelter themselves behind the prestige of science. Always at home when taking on the high priests of evolutionary theory - Dawkins, Wilson and their acolytes - she has famously described evolution (...)
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  29. Mary Midgley (2002). How Real Are You? Think 1 (2):35.
    Has science shown that people are, in some sense, an illusion? According to Mary Midgley, that is precisely what some scientists now preach. Focusing particularly on a claim made by Richard Dawkins, she explains why she believes these scientists are making a serious mistake.
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  30. Mary Midgley (2002). Pluralism. Philosophy Now 35:10-11.
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  31. Mary Midgley (2001). Heaven and Earth. Philosophy Now 34:18-21.
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  32. Mary Midgley (2001/2006). Science and Poetry. Routledge.
    "Midgley writes perceptively -- and beautifully -- about many things. But, in the end, it is the poetry, including the poetry of Midgley's prose, that makes the book worth reading." --Philip Clayton, Nature Science, according to the received wisdom of the day, can in the end answer any question we choose to put to it -- even the most fundamental questions about ourselves, our behavior and our cultures. Many go as far as to claim that science is all we need (...)
     
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  33. Mary Midgley & Demos (2001). Gaia the Next Big Idea. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  34. Mary Midgley (2000). Alchemy Revived. Hastings Center Report 30 (2):41-43.
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  35. Mary Midgley (2000). Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why We Should Pay Attention to the “Yuk Factor”. Hastings Center Report 30 (5):7-15.
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  36. Mary Midgley, David Papineau, Raymond Tallis, Lewis Wolpert & Anja Steinbauer (2000). Round Table: Science Vs Philosophy? Philosophy Now 27:34-38.
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  37. Mary Midgley (1999). Being Scientific About Our Selves. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (4):85-98.
    We cannot really understand other people unless we make some serious effort to understand ourselves as well. This is well known in ordinary life, but it sets a problem for any psychology which aims to be ‘scientific’ by the narrow standards which define that term today. Those standards have sharply narrowed the notion of ‘science’ to exclude reference to anything subjective. By contrast, the older, wider concept of it simply required disciplined, methodical thought, which could of course be shown in (...)
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  38. Mary Midgley (1999). Determinism, Omniscience, and the Multiplicity of Explanations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):900-901.
    Complete determinism is, as Karl Popper said, “a daydream of omniscience.” Determinism is usually conceived as linked with a particular science whose explanations are deemed fundamental. As Rose rightly points out, biological enquiry includes many different kinds of question. Genetic determinism, making genes central to biology, is therefore biased and misguided. The crucial unit must be the whole organism. Correspondence:c1 IA Collingwood Terrace, Newcastle on Tyne NE2 2JP, United Kingdom mbm@coll1a.demon.co.uk.
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  39. Mary Midgley (1999). Midgley on Murdoch. The Philosophers' Magazine 7:45-46.
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  40. Mary Midgley (1999). Should We Let Them Go. In Francine L. Dolins (ed.), Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare. Cambridge University Press. 152--63.
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  41. Mary Midgley (1999). The Origins of Don Giovanni. Philosophy Now 25:32-34.
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  42. Mary Midgley (1998). Book Notices-Utopias, Dolphins and Computers. Problems in Philosophical Plumbing. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):378-378.
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  43. Mary Midgley (1998). Putting Ourselves Together Again. In J. Cornwell (ed.), Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press. 160.
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  44. Mary Midgley (1998). Sorting Out The Zeitgeist: The Moral Philosophy of Iris Murdoch. The Philosopher 86 (1).
     
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  45. Mary Midgley (1997). Contract Ethics; Evolutionary Biology and the Natural Sentiments By Kahane Howard Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, Maryland 1995, Pp. Xiii+142. Philosophy 72 (281):468-.
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  46. Mary Midgley (1997). Skimpole Unmasked. History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):92-96.
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  47. Mary Midgley & Judith Hughes (1997). Are Families Out of Date? In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge. 55--68.
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  48. Mary Midgley (1996). Can Education Be Moral? Res Publica 2 (1):77-85.
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  49. Mary Midgley (1996). One World, but a Big One. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):500-514.
    ‘Explanations’ are of various kinds. They vary with the needs that call for them. The current need to ‘explain consciousness’ expresses not only curiosity about its causes but a wider uncertainty about its place in the general scheme of things. For much of this century, naive dogmatic materialism suggested that consciousness is a trivial matter with effectively no place in the world. Yet the behaviourists’ attempt to ignore our experience altogether has not proved workable. Scientists are therefore now trying to (...)
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  50. Mary Midgley (1996). Sustainability and Moral Pluralism. Ethics and the Environment 1 (1):41 - 54.
    Discussions of environmental ethics, and of applied ethics generally, easily produce a sense of unreality. But they are not a luxury. Faced with a new and monstrous predicament, we do need new thinking. Enlightenment morality, on which we still largely rely, has had enormous merits, but it strongly tends towards egoism and social atomism. This makes it hard for us to think, as we now must, about larger wholes.
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